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History of the Amiga


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Thanks for posting these, I spent a lot of time on the Amiga but after watching these it occurs to me I had no idea of the history of it.

No problem. I'm glad someone recognises quality. It's kind of iconic of our hobby. Not sure there are any better stories or launches out there. It struck me that the 85 Amiga launch pisses all over the 84 Mac launch and does indeed piss all over the iphone 4 launch. The making of the Amiga video is another league above the launch video. Awesome, awesome stuff. Not sure we'll ever see the like again.

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I'll definitely watch this tomorrow. The thing that amazes me is how the Amiga wasn't really the "true successor" to the Commodore 64, technically the Atari ST was (what with Jack Tramiel buying out Atari, and then bringing most of the people behind the C64 over with him to work on the ST). Commodore just basically bought Amiga, after their original deal with Atari turned out was really set up to fuck them over. But then you had no real idea what was going on behind the scenes

And I just dug out my Amiga today for a bit of SWOS in time for the World Cup... good timing!

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Top vids. Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol at a product launch? I doubt we'll ever see such a thing like that again! This reminds me that Amiga comes from across the pond, as to me back in the day it always seemed to have very British feel with it's top games and scene stuff always being something we've made.

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This reminds me that Amiga comes from across the pond, as to me back in the day it always seemed to have very British feel with it's top games and scene stuff always being something we've made.

It was the same with the ST, the demoscene really took off in Europe but you don't hear much about what the Americans did with them bar a few games and apps. They did indeed feel very European in that regard.

Will check the links out when I get back from work.

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I'll definitely watch this tomorrow. The thing that amazes me is how the Amiga wasn't really the "true successor" to the Commodore 64, technically the Atari ST was (what with Jack Tramiel buying out Atari, and then bringing most of the people behind the C64 over with him to work on the ST). Commodore just basically bought Amiga, after their original deal with Atari turned out was really set up to fuck them over. But then you had no real idea what was going on behind the scenes

And I just dug out my Amiga today for a bit of SWOS in time for the World Cup... good timing!

Not only was the Amiga not a true successor to the C64 it can be strongly argued that it was in actual fact a true successor to the Atari 800 et al.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Miner

Glad the love is spreading, if you have any love for the Amiga and you haven't seen these vids then you're in for a real treat.

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It's just not the same though is it? ;)

No, it's better :)

Ever since Commodore went bankrupt it was never the same, at least a dedicated following have kept the dream alive, this is the first official machine since ... can't remember!

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No, it's better :facepalm:

Ever since Commodore went bankrupt it was never the same, at least a dedicated following have kept the dream alive, this is the first official machine since ... can't remember!

I'm a massive Amiga fanboy, but even I can see that this is going to die a death.

It's underspecced, and will cost a small fortune, like all the other Amiga machines that have appeared since the death of Commodore.

The only way OS4 is going to get any kind of foothold at all is if it will work on Intel/AMD hardware.

I hope I'm wrong, but I just can't see it succeeding.

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Heartbreaking videos. The Amiga was so far ahead of its time its untrue. Commodore itself was for a good while years ahead of the competition, but probably ploughed TOO much money into R&D projects that never made it to completion.

If you can find it, On The Edge is a superb read, covering the story of Commodore from the beginning to the end with huge amount of behind the scenes stories.

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This video is fascinating, I've never seen it before. Those of us who love the Amiga have no doubt read multiple similar accounts but this just brings it home all the more poignantly.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=11...466889579052313

To bad just about everything RJ states in his stage performance about the dealings with Atari was made up.

Commodore just basically bought Amiga, after their original deal with Atari turned out was really set up to fuck them over.

Nope. That "fuck over" part was completely fabricated by RJ, who wasn't even involved in the direct dealings with Atari and the contracts. There was no stock negotiation, and no unfair deal. Curt Vendel and I spent a lot of time last year getting to the bottom of this, including paying for copies of the actual Federal court records which include the actual contracts and full testimonies by all parties involved. The complete terms of the deal were as followed:

It was started in the Fall of '83 with Warner and Atari Inc., further negotiated with Amiga during the January '84 CES, and signed in early

March of '84. The deal was for Warner and Atari to join the already several investors Amiga already had, by providing a $500,000 payment. The payment and initial contract were for several things:

1) a "guarantee" that in return Amiga would do a full licensing contract

together in late June when the chipset was to be delivered. As part

of the guarantee, all technical documents were kept in escrow until

the signing of the contract. If Amiga were to fold (as it was already

in financial distress, and in danger of being chopped up and sold off

by the other investors should this happen), Atari Inc. would gain

access to the documents in escrow as a recoup of it's investment

and longer need a license. They would not "own" Amiga or the

chipset, they simply would not need to license the technology anymore.

2) To gain access to Amiga's engineers and the still in development

chipset. The initial contract was for Atari to develop a game console

based on the Amiga chipset, to be released that Fall. Codenamed

Mickey, it was to be expandable in to a full computer - though that

would not be allowed by Amiga until Spring '85. A full Atari computer

was also planned around the chipset, and would not be allowed by Amiga

until '86. Likewise, Atari was to use the chipset in coin-op boards

as well.

3) Upon delivery of the three chips in late June and signing of the

licensing agreement, Atari would pay $500,000 per chip. They also

agreed to buy 1,000,000 preferred shares at $3 a share, and pay a

license fee of $2 per unit royalties on consumer and computer products, plus

a guaranteed minimum of $100,000 per year from coin-op sales at

$15 per unit sold.

Morse and his counterpart at Atari had even met at the June '84 CES and both were

excited about the pending licensing signing at the end of the month. In the interim,

Morse got cold feet and had worries that the Atari licensing deal may somehow screw with his

ultimate goal of selling Amiga outright. So they returned the $500,000 on June 30th

with the claim that the chips didn't work right, much to the surprise of the people over

at Atari. *Before* Warner's deal with Jack was announced.

The ST design was never to be based around the Amiga chips, that's another myth. Jack had zero knowledge

of the deal, as it was actually retained by Warner during the purchase. It wasn't until his son Leonard was going

through things during the evaluation period (they had shut down all projects and such for the month of July) that he

discovered the cashed check. Commodore had already had an injunction on Shiraz Shivji and two other former

Commodore engineers (who were now lead Atari Corp. engineers), barring them from doing any computer work for

Jack. In the interim (that July), Commodore had announced their intent to purchase Amiga. So when he and Leonard

discovered this, it was like a gift horse in Jack's lap. He renegotiated with Warner for the Amiga contract rights in early

August and then launched a suit against them the week after, which for all purposes was basically a countersuit to

Commodore to strike back. Both companies and parties wound up settling out of course several years later.

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To bad just about everything RJ states in his stage performance about the dealings with Atari was made up.

Nope. That "fuck over" part was completely fabricated by RJ, who wasn't even involved in the direct dealings with Atari and the contracts. There was no stock negotiation, and no unfair deal. Curt Vendel and I spent a lot of time last year getting to the bottom of this, including paying for copies of the actual Federal court records which include the actual contracts and full testimonies by all parties involved. The complete terms of the deal were as followed:

Now make a mildly-amusing stand-up routine about all that. For al lhis technical talent, I really found RJ hugely irritating in that video.

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Loved the Amiga, probably my most creative time (dpaint, octomed, amos basic etc) and am sad its not around anymore but PCs just offered so much more in the mid-late 90s that i had to put mine aside. Still got my a1200 somewhere..

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Genuine question, what part would an Amiga play in todays computing world? At least, at a certain point, it was renowned for video processing/FX (with the Video Toaster) and general multi-media stuff. But why would you buy an Amiga now? What does Amiga OS 4 offer that I can't do on a PC or Mac? Is there even any genuine cutting edge software designed for the Amiga now?

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[yt]Fx3q2wFIn6k[/yt]

There are no specific uses for an Amiga nowadays that can't be outclassed by PCs, Macs and Linux boxes.

Even the guy in the above vid said it's aimed for Amiga and tech enthusiasts... those who have been with it since the Commodore days. It will remain a niche product.

It is however, a nippy little OS (the install CD is ~50MB!) that allows you to do general everyday tasks using fewer resources than other systems. Using modern apps on a 400mHz processor with 256MB RAM is impossible on other computers. The OS also handles several things differently that some will prefer over Windows and MacOS.

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[yt]Fx3q2wFIn6k[/yt]

There are no specific uses for an Amiga nowadays that can't be outclassed by PCs, Macs and Linux boxes.

Even the guy in the above vid said it's aimed for Amiga and tech enthusiasts... those who have been with it since the Commodore days. It will remain a niche product.

It is however, a nippy little OS (the install CD is ~50MB!) that allows you to do general everyday tasks using fewer resources than other systems. Using modern apps on a 400mHz processor with 256MB RAM is impossible on other computers. The OS also handles several things differently that some will prefer over Windows and MacOS.

damn, now you've made me want one!! i -really- love workbench. I use osx/linux daily and tbh, they both suck compared to the elegance and speed of workbench.

If only they would set up some kind of ports system so we could get some linux apps over, i'd be really tempted. As it stands now, it doesn't look like there's software for anything really. Still..... lovin' 4.1

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