Jump to content

Great Films from First Time & One Time Directors


lordcookie
 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't know if Neill Blomkamp counts, but District 9 will probably become one of the big sci-fi classics.

LC mentioned it in the first post, the response to it was why he made the topic.

I just remember Speilberg's first film, Duel. Which was brilliant.

duel3.jpg

yeah

*edit*

It appears multiple people have already mentioned it. You got a pic of the truck out of this post, anyway. El Mariachi, anyone?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always enjoyed THX 1138, George Lucas' debut film. Maybe more so because I'm not really a fan of his other stuff.

Oh and of course Mean Streets, Scorcese's first effort. Although I think a lot of that is about Robert De Niro's performance.

Mean Streets wasn't Scorcese's first film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The legendary special effects pioneer, Douglas Trumbull, apart from providing SFX to many classics, directed his first film in the 1970s and I have a soft spot for it, Silent Running, which happens to be co-written by Steven Bochco and Michael Cimino too :angry:

Great effort for a $1.1 million budget.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Carnival of Souls - Herk Harvey

His one and only and a great choice. It always surprised me he didn't direct more features considering he did over 40 shorts.

The legendary special effects pioneer, Douglas Trumbull, apart from providing SFX to many classics, directed his first film in the 1970s and I have a soft spot for it, Silent Running, which happens to be co-written by Steven Bochco and Michael Cimino too :blah:

Great effort for a $1.1 million budget.

:(

Didn't Mel Brooks start his directing career with The Producers as well? Talented bast.

That he did.

Another good choice would be Mike Nichols with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jean-Luc Godard - Breathless

A_souffle.jpg

Thanks, you just reminded me of...

the-400-blows-blu-ray-11986-large.jpg

Truffault's 400 Blows (just in case the picture doesn't show up).

45707_3.jpg

Boyle's Shallow Grave. Still my favourite film from him.

Badlands_US1.jpg

Malick's Badlands is a stone cold classic.

1.jpg

Moodysson's Fucking Amal (aka Show Me Love) is still one of the finest 'growing up' movies there is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as we're not counting shorts, I'll nominate Martin McDonagh's In Bruges. Perhaps my favourite film of last year (and definitely in the Top 3), it deftly juggles a cast of thoroughly believable characters (even wringing a genuinely touching performance from Colin Farrell), healthy doses of black-as-tar humour, and the broader laughs of Ralph Fiennes' Don Logan-lite Cock-er-ney gangster. Absolutely superb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's an article on a similar topic to this in this month's Filmstar magazine. Off the top of my head they mention directors like Robin Hardy (The Wicker Man), Vincent Gallo (Buffalo 66) and the Blair Witch fellas.

Anyone read Filmstar? It's been going for a few issues now and it's really over designed, with lots of clashing styles. Quite jarring at times but at least has a couple of interesting articles each issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to have to go with The Blair Witch Project. Still the single most disturbing cinema experience I have ever had. Genius conception and delivery and still a hard film to sit through for me to this very day.

Oh, and Se7en as well. Fantastic, fantastic film. Such bleak nihilism is a rarity in a big hollywood title.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As much as Fincher would probably like to forget his experiences on Alien 3, Se7en wasn't his first feature film. ;)

Doh!

Completely forgot about Alien 3.

So throwing that in as well.

I really like the style of 3. Brutal, dark and nasty, with very little hope or salvation. Yes, it was somewhat hampered by studio interference, but I think it stands up well as Finsher's directorial debut.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doh!

Completely forgot about Alien 3.

So throwing that in as well.

I really like the style of 3. Brutal, dark and nasty, with very little hope or salvation. Yes, it was somewhat hampered by studio interference, but I think it stands up well as Finsher's directorial debut.

Definitely. I actually think it's underrated by many. The first two in the franchise were always going to be tough acts to follow. Seeing behind the scenes material and reading articles on Fincher's experience with Fox at the time, it's testament to his sheer will that he didn't jack it all in completely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apart from the ones already listed, a trawl through IMDB revealed a list of candidates (using the criteria of it being their first full length film):

Mike Hodges - Get Carter

Christopher Nolan - Following (Interesting non-linear neo-noir microbudget production from Nolan, his first full budget production, Memento really showed the level of talent he could display with some proper money available)

Peter Jackson - Bad Taste (Most people I know don't like it or indeed get it's charms, but amazing bang for production buck entertainment in my book)

Ridley Scott - The Duellists

Alan Parker - Bugsy Malone

Joss Whedon - Serenity

Richard Kelly - Donnie Darko

Wes Craven - The Last House on the Left

Alejandro Amenabar - Tesis (Thesis)

Takashi Shimizu - Ju-on (depends if you count V-Cinema (Direct to Video) as non-feature film and also the slight technical issue of the 2nd V-Cinema one having a very,very limited cinema release, though as his first wide cinema release was the same film basically remade, it probably doesn't matter too much :P)

George Clooney - Confessions of a Dangerous Mind

Zack Snyder - Dawn of the Dead (2004 remake) (I wasn't particularly looking forward to this as it seemed like some typical glossy remake, but Snyder did a good job IMO, in some ways better than the Romero original, probably because of having more money to play with :()

Michael Bay - Bad Boys (Not a huge fan of his later work, but I like this fun, violent action film quite a bit)

Michael Mann - Thief

Alan Clarke - Scum

Sam Mendes - American Beauty

Andrew Dominik - Chopper

John Lasseter - Toy Story

Chris Columbus - Adventures in Babysitting (his best directing job, seen it on TV more than once, they used to make truly fun films in the 80s)

John Hughes (RIP) - Sixteen Candles

Jim Abrahams/David Zucker/Jerry Zucker - Airplane!

Steven Soderbergh - Sex, Lies, and Videotape

Dario Argento - L'uccello dalle piume di cristallo (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage)

Paul Thomas Anderson - Hard Eight/Sydney

Possible contenders may include the likes of Luc Besson (Le dernier combat, interesting first film with no spoken (recognisable) dialogue whatsoever, so a foreign film you can watch without subtitles :), quite enjoyed it, shame he's pretty much retired from onhands directing), Gasper Noe (Seul Contre Tous/I Stand Alone, sequel to a semi-short he did earlier) and Michael Haneke.

After looking into it, I think you can basically conclude that most good directors started out that way and showed promise very early on in their careers, while Uwe Boll will never likely ever make a classic, despite trying an awful lot :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.