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How long will consoles physically live for?


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Looking though my collection of retro goodness and unfortunately some of the machines are no longer working [or unable to work on contemporary screens].

My fantastic Spectrum +3 is unable to read discs due to the rubber bands loosening, plastic cogs wearing but i can still get something from my NES.

So, which of the consoles & early computers will stand the test of time.

Will my c64 tapes fade with time?

My Cds lose the data?

The battery explode in zelda?

The cheap capacitors leak onto the motherboards in well, all of them?

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I've considered this myself. You can still pick up working 2600s. In fact, it's very rare to find one that doesn't work, so I can easily see that console lasting until about 2080.

The real problem is: Will we have TV sets that can display the things by that time? And will anyone care when they can just emulate them?

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Old games (and consoles) never die... they just get emulated!

Yes, they will all eventually die off- or they will become so prohibitively expensive to repair (due to lack of knowledge, spares etc)- and the only way to really play them will be through emulation. At least there are ways of playing them (either through Virtual Console or "unofficial" means).

You do miss a few little quirks of the original setup, but in all honesty I much prefer to play via emulation (especially on the Wii through Homebrew, as you can play them how God intended- on a TV!).

I can see some of the earlier, more robust, consoles and computers lasting longer. As pointed out, consoles like the Atari 2600 (and the amazing joystick) seemed like they were built to last. I think as you start moving towards CD based consoles, the consoles themselves were built with a "replacement" mentality- i.e. they were not built to last longer than 3 years. One console that really shows this is 360, with the RROD. Yes, MS can replace parts just now- but how long is it until they don't cover the 360? Add to the fact that you have downloaded content tied into that specific console, it's going to make life a lot more difficult in the future. However, it does add extra weight to the ROM/cracking community- if there is a time when you will not be able to literally transfer the games you've purchased to a replacement console, then you have to look at cracked ROMZ.

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The console I worry about the most is my Vectrex. They're notoriously unreliable and impossible to emulate. :)

As long as it outlives me, I'll be happy. But I can't see it happening. Unless I have an untimely death or something.

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The console I worry about the most is my Vectrex. They're notoriously unreliable and impossible to emulate. :(

As long as it outlives me, I'll be happy. But I can't see it happening. Unless I have an untimely death or something.

They aren't impossible to emulate. Just a pain because of the overlays and such.

http://vectrex.classicgaming.gamespy.com/emu.htm This site has a fair few though. I suppose you mean just due to the type of screen it won't look the same. :P

I always worry about my Amiga dying though my Floppy Drives have survived pretty well considering how old they are, and they still work superbly. Its the disks I worry about, I have thousands and now and then I'll come across one or two that have just died a death. Not technically a console though. :)

All my 16 bit consoles are going strong, and tbh if I see any lasting the longest it'd be those. I'm talking about the SNES/MD here. I can't recall ever really having much problems with those bar the cartridges being slightly dusty and needing a good blowout :)

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The Saturn is supposed to be one of the most reliable optical disc-based consoles, isn't it? Certainly more so than the PS1 or 2.

No they're not great. I've had a few die on me.

I like the idea of some old console I have being used long after im dead.

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I have this feeling there will be a hardcore minority hanging onto their CRTs.

I have a 28" Toshiba job that I have no desire to get rid of even though I have an HD telly. I also have a Philips 8833 which I use for Amiga/ST/C64 goodness.

Whilst most people probably binned their CRTs it'll become an essential part of retro gaming in the future, similar to how people keep their turntables to play vinyl.

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in 50 years time i would love all my consoles to be functioning, it is shame that DLC & digital distribution will scupper most peoples collections

I would hope by then someone would have managed to extract DLC and the like, although it would never be comparable to playing it as intended. Makes me wonder how long MS and the like will keep the servers going. I'll hopefully be able to play my Xbox 1 games well into the future - sans Live - but 360 games may be a different story.

Xbox 1, I would imagine, is a pretty good bet for longevity. It's essentially a PC in a box. Having said that I'll go into my other room, turn it on and find it has died. Sod's law, I guess.

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The only consoles I've had problems with ove the years are my original Xbox (still worked but something made a burning smell inside,) my 360 (on my 3rd one now) and my Dreamcast only reads discs when it feels like it.

Incidentally, is there any way of getting the DC to work properly? It's in great condition but it just stopped reading one day.

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the NES was built to withstand a nuclear blast I'm convinced

mines lasted over 20 years and last time I checked all clear. All cartridges worked and strangely my Kirby cartridge from 93 has still kept its save :(

the cartridge slot is a bit dodgy on some, and of course the plastic yellows :)

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The only consoles I've had problems with ove the years are my original Xbox (still worked but something made a burning smell inside,) my 360 (on my 3rd one now) and my Dreamcast only reads discs when it feels like it.

Incidentally, is there any way of getting the DC to work properly? It's in great condition but it just stopped reading one day.

Try turning it on with the dc upside down.

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Incidentally, is there any way of getting the DC to work properly? It's in great condition but it just stopped reading one day.

All discs? I've got a couple of discs that don't read anymore but there's nowt wrong with the DC itself. Just wondered if you had tried some other titles ;)

Get a spare drive off eBay. The DC is really easy to take apart and fix 'cos it's all just off the shelf stuff screwed together :P

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I have an old Megadrive which is a bit moody nowadays. Sound breaks-up and games occasionally crash - I'm assuming there's a dry-joint somewhere inside but it's so easy just to play on an emulator I've never gotten around to taking a peek inside.

I still have 3 DC's (one a UK Launch model) which all worked last time I tried them (within the last year) - two were 'used to death' for PSO (1 and 2 respectively) and the 3rd was given to me barely-used with 4 controllers ;)

My old Amiga still worked last time I tried too.

My old Z88 portable doodah stopped working last year tho - real shame as I still used it from time-to-time - but it's totally dead and no tinkering has thus caused it to arise... :P

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The Saturn is supposed to be one of the most reliable optical disc-based consoles, isn't it? Certainly more so than the PS1 or 2.

Saturn Drive failure is fairly common, the fact there are multiple models of drive, all with different connections does not help.

Famicom disk drives (including the drive in the Sharp Twin Famicom as its the exact same drive inside) are a fecking nightmare. The rubber bands they rely on are extremely susceptible to snapping, and they are a bastard to fit. I'm not sure if Super Quincy ever fitted his actually.

Pc Engine's seem quite solid, the Hu card design means knackard slots/boards are less likely then other carts. I suspect this extends to similar designs where the pins are mounted on only one side, like the GBA. A GBA SP will certainly withstand a lot of abuse

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They aren't impossible to emulate. Just a pain because of the overlays and such.

http://vectrex.classicgaming.gamespy.com/emu.htm This site has a fair few though. I suppose you mean just due to the type of screen it won't look the same. ;)

Exactly. You can emulate the gameplay fine but not the true look and feel of the thing, which is pretty much the whole point of the Vectrex really.

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My old Z88 portable doodah stopped working last year tho - real shame as I still used it from time-to-time - but it's totally dead and no tinkering has thus caused it to arise... :P

Ah man, that's a shame. I bought one off the forum a while back that had died too, although it was assumed to work. I've had several of them over the years and I always put it to good use, it made a really good word processor! Asus didn't invent the netbook ;)

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They aren't impossible to emulate. Just a pain because of the overlays and such.

Having seen a Vectrex at that Game On event years ago, the actual screen is so disctinctive compared to a raster scan screen. Emulation doesn't really cut it. You need that oscilloscope-style effect.

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