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JohnC

Terry Pratchett's "Going Postal"

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I wasn't all that impressed with making money as a book, despite the fact that I loved going postal. Something i thought about the trailer was that Richard Coyle seems to play Moist in a sort of 'not really sure what's going on, thrust into situations, a bit awkward' sort of way (much like his Geoff in Coupling), whereas the book is clear that Moist is very switched on, adapts situations to his advantage immediately, and overall is quite a smooth operator. Is this the case? Or is it just me seeing the Geoff in him :blink:

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I'm not familiar with him in Coupling or from the character from to books, but I got as sense of both of those. Lets face it, he is being thrust into situations he knows nothing about. But it seems to me that, when he needs to, he does see any opportunity to turn it to his advantage and grasp it.

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The trailer for this pissed me off. It said something like 'can a second class crook become a first class hero?' when describing Moist, when anyone who has read the books will know he is an exceptional con-artist, which is entirely the point of Vetinari recruiting him in the first place.

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So how was it in the end? I watched the first ep and thought it was ok - better than the last two - but not amazing. The golems and Mr. Gryle looked awful. Richard Coyle was awesome, as always. He's playing Moist perfectly. He was also the best thing about Coupling by a country mile.

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So how was it in the end? I watched the first ep and thought it was ok - better than the last two - but not amazing. The golems and Mr. Gryle looked awful. Richard Coyle was awesome, as always. He's playing Moist perfectly. He was also the best thing about Coupling by a country mile.

I really enjoyed it to be honest, Coyle made it as his Moist was pretty spot on I thought, but I have to agree about the Golems and Gryle, didnt look as good as they should have.

3.5 cassidy's out of 5, but much better than HF and COM.

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If they're doing another Rincewind book you know exactly who you're going to get :)

del-boy.jpg

(And I nearly linked to an image of him that turned out to be hosted on Stormfront. Yes. That Stormfront)

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Just watched this and thoroughly enjoyed it. Best of the adaptations by a mile, helped by a more suitable tale to adapt but it was high-quality stuff anyway. Some bad CGI (par for the course) and the golems looked crap, but the general set design was beautiful and the portrayal of the clacks was utterly perfect. Everyone involved in bringing to life that rickety semaphore system deserves acclamation.

Good performances throughout, too. David Suchet made a fantastically over the top villain.

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I've just watched the first one, and I'm genuinely impressed. And considering that Colour Of Magic was probably the worst thing I saw on television that whole year (and Hogfather wasn't much better) I'm doubly astonished.

Still, it's pretty ironic that probably the first decent Sky 1 exclusive production ever made is a tale about the superiority of a public-run industry over the money-grabbing profiteering of a privatised one. I guess whoever Murdoch has watching over the channel for him must have taken sick the day it was pitched to them.

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On Rapidshare I can find part 2 but no part 1...

Anyone got any links so someone not in the UK can actually watch this?

What about people in the UK but with no Sky subscription? I went to the site, it said you needed to log in to a free sky account to watch it, so I signed up, and then it said you needed to have a sky subscription :omg:

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Finished it a few minutes ago, not bad at all. It grew on me as it went, there were a few lines from the book which I think could have worked and obviously the whole thing was shrunk, but overall enjoyable. Adora Belle was sexy in a way that she never was when voiced by Tony Robinson <_< I thought I wouldn't like Charles Dance as Vetinari, but again he grew on me. I thought it could have done with being a bit more colourful, though.

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Brilliant stuff.

Haven't seen Hogfather but I quite enjoyed Colour of Magic despite David Jason (nothing wrong with his acting, just the single worst casting decision ever made). This was miles better. Haven't read the book but don't care. Fantastic story done well. Loads of fun.

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Ace! Loved it, Richard Coyle was excellently cast. The only thing I would have changed would be to have Alan Rickman as Vetinari, not that I think he would have been particularly like the book character, just that the world needs more Alan Rickman.

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Can we merge this with the Hogfather threads and Colour of Magic thread and make this a general thread for Pratchett adaptations?

Because recently there's been some big news! First there were the reports that Terry Jones would be involved with a four-part TV adaptation of Good Omens, which Pratchett confirmed:

http://www.paulkidby.com/news/index.html

There has been one hell of a lot of rumours regarding a Good Omens adaptation over the past few weeks, mostly started by me at the SFX Weekender. So, ladies and gentleman, I can hereby exclusively reveal that - YES - Neil and myself have shaken hands and received groats from Rod Brown sealing a TV deal. An official announcement from Prime Focus will follow in a couple of weeks time. However, I can reveal right now that Terry Jones (yes, the Python) and Gavin Scott (not a Python, but he gets it) are already on the job. It's been a long time coming, but it's looking good.

Very good news, even if it's the wrong Python called Terry! ;)

And then a few days ago there was the announcement that the same team would be involved in an ongoing City Watch TV series, with the production company having the right to create original stories not necessarily adaptations of specific books! :o Again, the Paulkidby.com news page has the press release:

Terry Pratchett - The Watch Series

Sir Terry Pratchett and Rod Brown, Managing Director of Prime Focus Productions, announce that they have come to an agreement for the unprecedented and exclusive worldwide television rights to create brand new storylines for the iconic characters of Pratchett’s phenomenally successful Discworld series.

Terry’s universal success has seen him create one of the leading fantasy fiction franchises of all time, with 70 million worldwide sales of his 38 book Discworld titles (with a 39th being published in October 2011). Whilst there have been three successful mini series adaptations of his Discworld books made for television in the UK, this is the first time that Pratchett has granted a production company the international rights to his characters and world, for the creation of new stories exclusively for a television audience.

The main focus of the series will be set in the bustling, highly mercantile, largely untrustworthy and always vibrant city of Ankh-Morpork and will follow the day-to-day activities of the men, women, trolls, dwarves, vampires and several other species who daily pound its ancient cobbles (and, of course, Igor in the forensics department). Terry commonly refers to the City Watch police force series as “the jewels in the Discworld Crown.” These richly developed and highly compelling characters will feature in a ‘crime of the week’ episodic storyline. As each weekly adventure unfolds, viewers will be taken on a ride through Pratchett’s genius imagination, with the author overseeing the creation of the series, where wild and exciting encounters with werewolves, dragons, dwarfs, trolls and golems and the classic heroes and villains, are an everyday occurrence…and where many of these characters even make outstanding crime fighters!

Rod Brown, Managing Director of Prime Focus Productions said, "I believe that the globally successful Discworld franchise will readily translate to the small screen in the form of a high-end, mass appeal weekly drama series. It will give the audience the anticipation and excitement of brand new Discworld stories every week through the medium of television, rather than books. It’s a huge responsibility to get this right for Terry, his legions of Discworld fans and the new followers to his work that we will attract along the way, but I believe they will be in for a treat with a high calibre writing team already attached, including ‘Monty Python’s’ Terry Jones and Gavin Scott (Small Soldiers, The Borrowers). We have already spoken to a number of international broadcasters who have shown early interest and we hope to move forward very quickly to bring this exciting project to fruition”.

Sir Terry Pratchett said, "I’m very excited! I really am incredibly happy about this because Rod was part head of the team that produced the very successful Sky One adaptations and my message of encouragement to him now is; don't bugger it up!"

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Great news about Good Omens; the Watch TV series, however, I'm not sure about... Could be good, could be average, has potential to be rubbish though...

Must remain optimistic. I thought Going Postal was really good, and if they get this right I'll be a happy man :)

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Great stuff, Good Omens is my favourite comedy in written form, and in the Discworld, Vimes and company are (IMO) at least on par with the Witches as some of the best mainstay characters in the Discworld novels. Or any novels, really.

Fuck Rincewind- most of his stories were being written while Pratchett was still honing his art (and it shows.. ooh I am still a Wizzard who still spells his name wrong LOL :rolleyes: )- but the more recent Discworld books are an art all to themselves, with a firm and unblinking examination of our modern lives.

I was going to compare them to the Simpsons and their (now) atrocious early episodes vs their later and better written, better scripted skits on our society but the comparison simply doesn't do the later Pratchett books justice.

Cant wait! Dont fuck it up!

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Holy shit, I missed this. Good Omens is one of my favourite ever books. Read it at least three times. I hope this all goes ahead. Even if it's bad, I just love the thought of seeing it in TV form.

Also that's an interesting post Masu - I'd fallen out of love with Pratchett a bit because the more I read the more it seemed like the same tricks. If the newer books are as interesting as you say I might have to pick some up. I wanted to read Unseen Academicals anyway because of the subject matter, so I might start there.

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Unseen Academicals isn't very good. I mean, it's fine. It's no Monstrous Regiment in terms of 'weak Discworld book'. But it's not one of the stand-out books. When did you stop reading them? If it was before Night Watch, get that fucking read right now.

Also you should read Nation. It's not Discworld but it's fantastic.

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Great stuff, Good Omens is my favourite comedy in written form, and in the Discworld, Vimes and company are (IMO) at least on par with the Witches as some of the best mainstay characters in the Discworld novels. Or any novels, really.

Fuck Rincewind- most of his stories were being written while Pratchett was still honing his art (and it shows.. ooh I am still a Wizzard who still spells his name wrong LOL :rolleyes: )- but the more recent Discworld books are an art all to themselves, with a firm and unblinking examination of our modern lives.

I wrote my university dissertation on exactly this - what I found quite interesting were the parallels between his development as a satirical writer and the progress of Juvenal, who was one of the first satirists. They both started off parodying an epic style of literature that had already almost become a parody of itself, but then ended up using the epic style to directly address society as a whole.

Or some bollocks.

The TV adaptations have been a bit shit though :(

Oh and yes the Night Watch books are definitely his best

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