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Brink


marlonharewood
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I don't usually get the chance to begin a topic on a new game as people always beat me to it, but I don't think anyone has started a topic on Bethesda's new game Brink yet. The trailer for it just got revealed in gametrailer's pre E3 show. It is being developed by Splash Damage who were responsible for Enemy Territory Quake Wars and Wolfenstein.

Brink on Gametrailers

From first impressions it looks like a space setting where a planet has been destroyed. Oh and something about an arc. The trailer has blood coming down the forehead of a guy, which you can read into whatever you want. My guess is that it is going to be a similar mix to Fallout 3 with shooting and RPG mechanics. Because of the developer's history maybe its focus will be more on the FPS shooting aspect. I've always felt that a Bioware and Bethesda match up would be a gamer's wet dream as both company's are very good at different aspects in their game, Bioware for their storytelling and atmosphere, and Bethesda for creating a well realised world and immersion. So I'm hoping that this will be Bethesda's answer to Mass Effect, even though I know its not being developed in house.

Game is going to be about Spring 2010 for PC and the other 2 consoles whatever they are called.

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Not in-house? damn, I was hoping this would be the next scifi elder scrolls. A non-in-house bethesda game could mean anything, they publish all sorts of shit like:

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Of course the Enemy Territory guys are a bit better than that, but this certainly won't be the next Oblivion/Fallout, nor do I think it will be Bethesda's answer to Mass Effect.

It'll probably end up being something generic like a Waterworld/Gears of War game with Fallout 3's Tire Pouldrons and TF2's funny looking heads.

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Of course the Enemy Territory guys are a bit better than that, but this certainly won't be the next Oblivion/Fallout, nor do I think it will be Bethesda's answer to Mass Effect.

No, it's presumably going to be an action game. Thankfully. Bethesda already put out (more than) enough Elder Scrolls-y stuff with all the FO3 DLC.

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It is an FPS. I have been a huge fan of Splash Damage's work for a long time and hope this will live up to their previous work. I have complete faith in their multiplayer side but if this is mainly focussed on single player, and it looks like it will, then I need to be convinced.

Need to see some gameplay, they've been working on this for about 2 years!

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They've been putting together some good talent to lead that project: Richard Ham (lead designer Fable 2, Syphon Filter 1 & 2 and a bunch of other things) left us to join them as Creative Director, Tim Appleby joins from Bioware (although he's a local boy having started off at Mucky Foot) and Olivier Leonardi from Ubisoft. Trailer doesn't give much away but I'm looking forward to see what they're doing.

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Brink is set in 2035, after global warming has caused the seas to rise to such a level that most of the world has become uninhabitable. The game is set on The Ark, a futuristic floating city, which itself has begun to deteriorate along with humanity. A civil war has sprung out, pitting the resistance versus the security forces, in which you can play either side in this first-person shooter.

Visually, the game looks like a cross between Team Fortress 2’s stylized reality with the granular detail of Gears of War. Not only do the buffed-up characters look unique from any other game you’ve seen, they look really unique from each other. You can customize them to look differently—which is really nothing that new in the world of games—but the characters you end up with look really cool. Tough, but in a cartoony way. A non-silly cartoony way.

The world of The Ark reflects the unique look of the game as well. The colors are hyper-saturated and the textures are hyper-detailed, making the standard degraded/futuristic environments really stand out. The game is strangely beautiful for a title that is all about hardcore shooter action, and comparing it to other games or artistic looks just feels insufficient. It looks like…Brink.

The game doesn’t just stake a claim on its own uniqueness by claiming an iconoclastic look. Brink also makes some strides in reinventing the shooter genre. The single-player mode somehow combines the linearity of a story-driven experience, with the sense of flexibility you get from a more open-ended design. Within each larger mission, there are a series of smaller missions that you can complete at your will. These are not exactly side missions since they actually help you build up experience points and make the main mission go more smoothly. Rather, the larger mission feels like a collection of smaller missions, all made open to you in the midst of some never-relenting close-quarters combat.

For example, you can be in the middle of a firefight, working your way towards the final objective you need to complete and move the story to the next level, when someone on your team will come over the radio asking for an engineer. You quickly bring up your mission-wheel interface, which gives you the ability to choose between that mission and a bunch of others that include things like “go interrogate that guy” or “plant a bomb” or “switch to this class (like engineer) and plant this turret.” If you’re playing co-op, you’ll sometimes get missions dependent on one your teammate chose, usually along the lines of going and covering them while they take on their task. Of course, you probably don’t need to do any of them outside your main mission, but it would be a lot cooler if you did.

This mission-within-the-mission structure feels really innovative, and we’re looking forward to trying it out for ourselves. The fact that it interacts dynamically in co-op mode makes it even more interesting as a design element. It also makes it a lot more interesting than the standard linear mission structure.

The last new innovative feature of Brink is something called the “SMART” button. SMART stands for “smooth movement across random terrain” (clever, eh?), and it’s a simplified way to traverse an area. Instead of figuring out how to get across a room full of crates and up on to a platform, all you have to do is point where you want to go, hit the SMART button and voilà, the game does the rest. It works great for movement puzzles, too. During the demo, the developers from Splash Damage showed how you could get past a metal detector by pointing at the top of the detector to go over or pointing low to do a sliding move under the sensor. It’s doubtful this will make the game too easy, especially if the game finds clever ways to implement it.

Every year we get to see something new and intriguing at E3, and this year it was on Day One of the show. Brink is bringing something very new to the table, and we’ll be following its progress up until the release in the first half of 2010.

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http://previews.teamxbox.com/xbox-360/2335/Brink/p1/

Features

Blurring the Lines Between Offline and Online - Advance your character’s development across every gameplay mode: single player, co-op, and multiplayer. Gain experience points that you can spend on customizing and upgrading your skills and abilities, designing an entirely unique look and feel for your character.

Groundbreaking Kinesthetics - Brink uses the familiar shooter controls that you’re used to, without frustrating, artificial constraints and takes advantage of a new feature: the SMART button. When you press the SMART button, the game dynamically evaluates where you’re trying to get to, and makes it happen. No need to perfectly time a jump or vault, the game knows what you want to do.

Context-Sensitive Goals and Rewards - Objectives, communications, mission generation, and inventory selection are all dynamically generated based on your role, your status, your location, your squad-mates, and the status of the battle in all gameplay modes. You’ll always know exactly where to go, what to do when you get there, and what your reward will be for success.

Virtual Texturing – Brink’s proprietary technology, Virtual Texturing, breaks new ground on current-gen consoles and PCs with an even greater focus on highly detailed characters, realistic environments, lighting, effects, and atmospherics,. This competitive lead on the squad-combat genre helps thrust players into the gritty reality of the Ark's epic secluded arcology.

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Of course the Enemy Territory guys are a bit better than that, but this certainly won't be the next Oblivion/Fallout, nor do I think it will be Bethesda's answer to Mass Effect.

It'll probably end up being something generic like a Waterworld/Gears of War game with Fallout 3's Tire Pouldrons and TF2's funny looking heads.

Fucking called it.

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  • 2 months later...

Impressions from Quakecon

I wasn’t really hyped about Brink before, but the presentation here at QuakeCon won me over. They asked for no video of the gameplay, but I did get some video about the leveling and customizing system that I will be uploading later today.

As for the gameplay, it looked like Halo to me, but in motion it may feel like Call of Duty. You’re put into the game with a bunch of A.I. squad mates, and you chose a role that has certain missions objectives. As you go, you can find terminals that let you change your load out for other objectives. It seems that outside terminals you can choose objectives that give you different amounts of experience points. These points are used to get cooler gear, which you edit your load outs with.

Another feature that makes the gameplay unique is a sort of contextual button. Using this and aiming in that direction, you can get to any point as long as your character allows of it. This consists of sliding under low objects, jumping and climbing over obstacles, etc. This adds another dept of movement that will sure set this game apart.

Also, from what it sounds like, single player and online play are interwoven, so any A.I. squad mates off line can be real players online. This will be great, as there seems to be class-specific gear and objectives that will really define the game as a co-op experience.

Graphics look great, as it wasn’t too shiny like games looked to be heading, and it has a slight cartoony look to the characters themselves.

The presentation ended with the characters opening a contain and appear to have a surprised look on their faces with a green glow present. The screen goes black and the main character asks ‘what was our objective again?’. Could this be a Drake’s Fortune/FarCry/Crisis surprise? I wouldn’t mind a bit.

Release is scheduled for Spring 2010 on all major platforms.

http://www.bluegamer.net/2009/08/14/quakec...k-presentation/

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New Preview

First up is an approach to movement that, while brazenly borrowing from DICE's Mirror's Edge, revitalises first-person shooting. Centred around the SMART button (that's Smart Movement Across Random Terrain, acronym lovers) it offers an athleticism that's unprecedented in such a game. One example best highlights its function; when faced with a doorway latticed with infrared security beams, the player has three options. The first one's simple enough - run head-on, trigger the alarm and prepare to fight.

The other two are both facilitated by the SMART button - look up as you approach the obstacle and it prompts a vault, look down and it sends the player into a slide underneath the beams. Both moves are conveyed with convincingly weighty full body animations, and the feature's functions stretch well beyond the basic example we're first given - later on, for instance, we see the player leap up to overhanging platforms and across small chasms. It's a feature that makes for motion that's as kinetic as its gunplay, and it more than lives up to its name.

Another part of Brink's make-up that helps differentiate it is its assured art direction, treading a fine line between photorealism and the cartoon excess of Team Fortress 2. Powered by a heavily retooled iteration of id Tech 4, it's best displayed in the Container City level that makes up the latter part of our demo. Here, some of gaming's hardest worn clichés are seemingly subverted by turning the first-person staple of crates and iron into a vibrant map where rusted reds sit beautifully alongside azure blues.

"We're pretty pleased with that," says Stern. "There's a reason why there're lots of games that contain warehouses full of crates, because – in terms of geometry - it's a relatively efficient way of doing it. Don't get me wrong – there are some brilliant levels that involve crates in warehouses – but we specifically wanted to do stuff people hadn't seen before, so it's a different setting, it's a different art style. The whole feel of it, hopefully, is a bit different."

Different, too, is the look of Brink's protagonists, and although their roots are in the muscled iconography of what's an achingly machismo genre, they've been painted with a Pixar-like brush resulting in an abundance of character. They're open to customisation that offers generous depth, and each move of a slider in the creation menu will have an effect on the battlefield – create a stocky character and, as you'd expect, they'll be slow to move but more able to take hits, while a wiry frame ensures speed at the cost of endurance.

Characters have all classes available to them at any one time, and while the list is limited to four types – Operative, Medic, Soldier and Engineer – they're each almost infinitely customisable using upgrades earned through harvesting experience points throughout the course of play. While this might sound typical for any online first-person shooter, the way it plays out on the battlefield is anything but.

Maps are foreshadowed by small cut-scenes, establishing a narrative that involves two factions – the authoritarian Security and the libertarian Resistance. The demo we see on Container City takes this further, with the cut-scene bleeding into the first few minutes play as an unseen Resistance sniper takes down one of the player's Security group and attempts to pick off the rest.

Working through the tangle of iron – with a little help from the SMART button – the player soon comes across a hard-fought battle between the two factions, and the din of gunfire ricocheting across the containers is deafening. Sliding into cover, it's straight into the action, and what follows is a pitched battle that sees each team attempting to fulfil a number of objectives while fighting off the opposing side.

Watching the demo with a fixed grin, we're never quite sure if what we're watching is single-player or multiplayer, but what we do know is that it looks like an absolute riot. The distinction between the two is so well blurred that it's only later that we realise that what we were watching was being played by several real-life players – and when the game ships, every position can be taken via drop-in/drop-out online play.

"The single-player/multiplayer thing, it's been a weird series of mindsets," explains Stern, "and the stereotypical thing is you're good at the single-player game, you're really enjoying it, you go online and it's such a different experience, you're bad at it and you fail to enjoy it. We're passionate about multiplayer objective gameplay, it's fantastic, but they can also be the most annoying thing when you're trying to play a game – so we're trying to guarantee all the stuff that's great about it and remove all the irking stuff, and make it completely seamless and consistent."

From our eye-watering and ear-popping first look, it seems that Brink is fully capable of fulfilling Splash Damage's mission in blurring the lines between single and multiplayer, and doing so in a way that's fast-paced, gutsy and full of thrills. Brink is more than just noise – it's also shaping up to be one of the definitive shooter experiences of next year.

http://uk.xbox360.ign.com/articles/101/1017951p1.html

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7th September US Release?

Recently Bethesda and GameStop joined forces to promote a sweepstake for their upcoming shooter, Brink, where one lucky winner has the chance to win a new home entertainment system and choice of console.

In the advertisement for the giveaway on GameStop's website, the retailer went one step further... and gave the title a release date. The advertisement states that Brink will be available in stores on September 7th 2010.

Of course, retailers are about as trustworthy as John Terry when it comes to release dates, but seeing as this is a promotion arranged with Bethesda and the new date falls in line with their rescheduled "fall 2010" release, we're inclined to take it as gospel.

http://www.xbox360achievements.org/news/ne...he-Shooter.html

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