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marlonharewood
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Does the second book in The Three Body Problem trilogy get any better?  I'm at about 25% in and I'm losing the will to live reading it at the moment.  Nothing is happening and if it does happen it doesn't seem to make any sense, and the awkwardly translated prose isn't helping either.

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17 hours ago, SharkyOB said:

Does the second book in The Three Body Problem trilogy get any better?  I'm at about 25% in and I'm losing the will to live reading it at the moment.  Nothing is happening and if it does happen it doesn't seem to make any sense, and the awkwardly translated prose isn't helping either.

I just finished the trilogy. I thought the 2 and 3 were far better than the first, but this needed some serious editing work. This is far, far too long.

 

Don’t really even know how I finished it….

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 30/09/2020 at 05:21, ZOK said:

Yes I know that story, and I can’t think of it either...there’s a portal that aliens keep dumping ‘junk’ through or something, is it JG Ballard maybe? 
 

By the way, I’ve been downloading lots of Gardner Dozois short story collections to make sure I haven’t missed any. Finding his stuff is always a pain because he edited a thousand books but only wrote about twenty stories so they crop up everywhere and his name is on everything, but I think I’ve found the best anthology, and you all need to read it, it’s called When The Great Days Come, with an intro by Robert Silverberg:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B005B01GZW/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=&sr=

 

It’s £5.52 on Kindle, has nearly all his best shorts in it (A Special Kind of Morning, Chains of the Sea, A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows, Morning Child etc), and for my money he just cannot be beaten for this highly lyrical, big science, high misery style SF.

 

Basically if you like beautiful stories of how the world will end, this is it.

Digging this post up a bit as it was a little while ago but had this on my wishlist and managed to get it for $1 (on Kobo )with a promotion. Only read  the 1st 2 stories so far and if I'd known I'd have paid full price for it and read it sooner. Neither are beautiful world ending stories but "Counterfactual"  could be the inspiration for multiple longer stories, not least "American war" by Omar El Akkad, a decent book in itself and  "The Hanging Curve" has such a poignant , understated ending it will stay with me for a long time.

 

 

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7 hours ago, lolly said:

Digging this post up a bit as it was a little while ago but had this on my wishlist and managed to get it for $1 (on Kobo )with a promotion. Only read  the 1st 2 stories so far and if I'd known I'd have paid full price for it and read it sooner. Neither are beautiful world ending stories but "Counterfactual"  could be the inspiration for multiple longer stories, not least "American war" by Omar El Akkad, a decent book in itself and  "The Hanging Curve" has such a poignant , understated ending it will stay with me for a long time.

 

 


So glad you’re enjoying it! Funnily enough those two are not really typical of his SF style (if there is such a thing with Dozois), I think the next story is much more his métier…but if you loved those I’m certain this book is going to blow you away.

 

I’ll have a look through my collection and see what isn’t in that particular anthology which are worth seeking out too.

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Also available (But slightly more expensive) is an amazing alt-Doctor story 

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Doctor-Who-Infinity-Lance-Parkin-ebook/dp/B0056GJHX4

 

"Sing about the past again, and sing that same old song. Tell me what you know, so I can tell you that you're wrong."

Gallifrey. The Doctor's home planet. For twenty thousand centuries the Gallifreyans have been the most powerful race in the cosmos. They have circumnavigated infinity and eternity, harnessed science and conquered death. They are the Lords of Time, and have used their powers carefully.

But now a new force has been unleashed, one that is literally capable of anything. It is enough to give even the Time Lords nightmares. More than that: it is enough to destroy them.

It is one of their own. Waiting for them at the end of the universe.

 

(The blurb on the page says it's 8 but it's never made explicit in the book and the entire tale is parallel universe anyway.)

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On 18/02/2021 at 22:15, hungry joe said:

I've just ripped through "There Is No Antimemetics Division", which is sort of like Xcom meets Memento. It's short and only a couple of quid and really recommend it.

 

Finished it last night and then went down a SCP rabbit hole for hours.

This was a genuinely great read though, thanks for putting it on my radar.

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2 hours ago, ZOK said:

Thanks @lolly, now I’m reading Chains of the Sea again for the fiftieth time, instead of The Meaning of Mariah Carey which I was in the middle of. :quote:

Not going to get an apology for that! I'm literally just about to start it , have worked my way through a couple of the more apocalyptic stories, somehow managing to be  gloriously depressing , was going to compare him to Cormac McCarthy  but it's not that level of nihilism , there's a sly sense of humour  and more imagination.Douglas Adams playing it straight maybe?

 

It threw into sharp relief the paucity of the stories in Love, Death and Robots  Vol 2 (and 1) that I watched over  the weekend ,though it might be unfair given the  respective medium.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

There's a new Adrian Tchaikovsky book out tomorrow. First in a sci-fi trilogy

 

Shards of Earth

The war is over.
Its heroes forgotten.
Until one chance discovery . . .

Idris has neither aged nor slept since they remade his mind in the war. And one of humanity’s heroes now scrapes by on a freelance salvage vessel, to avoid the attention of greater powers.

Eighty years ago, Earth was destroyed by an alien enemy. Many escaped, but millions more died. So mankind created enhanced humans ­such as Idris - who could communicate mind-to-mind with our aggressors. Then these ‘Architects’ simply disappeared and Idris and his kind became obsolete.

Now, Idris and his crew have something strange, abandoned in space. It’s clearly the work of the Architects – but are they really returning? And if so, why? Hunted by gangsters, cults and governments, Idris and his crew race across the galaxy as they search for answers. For they now possess something of incalculable value, and many would kill to obtain it.

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I think I'm going to read this next. The Last Human. Came out last year and is currently 1.99 on Kindle

 

Sarya is the galaxy's worst nightmare: a Human.

But most days, she doesn't feel like the most terrifying creature in the galaxy. No, most days, she's got other things on her mind. Like hiding her identity among the hundreds of alien species roaming the corridors of Watertower Station. Or making sure her adoptive mother doesn't casually eviscerate one of their neighbors. Again.

And most days, she can almost accept that she'll never know the truth about why humanity was deemed too dangerous to exist, or whether she really is - impossibly - the lone survivors of a species destroyed a millennium ago. That is, until an encounter with a bounty hunter leaves her life and her perspective shattered.

Thrown into the universe at the helm of a stolen ship, Sarya begins to uncover an impossible truth. Humanity's death and her own existence might simply be two moves in a demented cosmic game, one that might offer the thing she wants most in the universe - a second chance for herself, and one for humanity.

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2 hours ago, Flub said:

I think I'm going to read this next. The Last Human. Came out last year and is currently 1.99 on Kindle

 

Sarya is the galaxy's worst nightmare: a Human.

But most days, she doesn't feel like the most terrifying creature in the galaxy. No, most days, she's got other things on her mind. Like hiding her identity among the hundreds of alien species roaming the corridors of Watertower Station. Or making sure her adoptive mother doesn't casually eviscerate one of their neighbors. Again.

And most days, she can almost accept that she'll never know the truth about why humanity was deemed too dangerous to exist, or whether she really is - impossibly - the lone survivors of a species destroyed a millennium ago. That is, until an encounter with a bounty hunter leaves her life and her perspective shattered.

Thrown into the universe at the helm of a stolen ship, Sarya begins to uncover an impossible truth. Humanity's death and her own existence might simply be two moves in a demented cosmic game, one that might offer the thing she wants most in the universe - a second chance for herself, and one for humanity.

 

I am absolutely loving this. The first few chapters have been wonderful.

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Reader gentlegerman on Amazon begs to differ

 

Quote

It's about a human child getting adopted by an female alien after the humans got mostly extinct. The main Character is female (again). The the villains are male of course and the extinction of the evil agressive human race seems to be "ok" for the author. 
In my opinion this is one more example of the woke toxic ideology of modern times.

 

Can't believe they let women be in books now. Thanks Obama.

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On 29/05/2021 at 19:09, Danster said:

I have just bought this specifically because of that review* - ha take that gentlegerman!

 

Does that mean you should mark that review as "helpful"? 🤔 It helped you make the decision about whether or not to buy it...

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Finally finished When The Great Days Come, by Gardner Dozois   as I have been struggling to find time to read.  I've probably banged on a bit in this thread about other books but this is absolutely worth picking up , there's some unique and mind blowing stories in here as well a few twists on established or more familiar stories /themes, I've been genuinely surprised on more than one occasion while working my way through it. There's a  beautiful melancholy in some of the stories , aided by quite  fantastic writing , and often a distorted sense of humour.

 

Well worth a read , it's probably in my top 3 Sci-Fi books (which is a  bit of a cheat as its a heap of stories).

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17 hours ago, lolly said:

Finally finished When The Great Days Come, by Gardner Dozois   as I have been struggling to find time to read.  I've probably banged on a bit in this thread about other books but this is absolutely worth picking up , there's some unique and mind blowing stories in here as well a few twists on established or more familiar stories /themes, I've been genuinely surprised on more than one occasion while working my way through it. There's a  beautiful melancholy in some of the stories , aided by quite  fantastic writing , and often a distorted sense of humour.

 

Well worth a read , it's probably in my top 3 Sci-Fi books (which is a  bit of a cheat as its a heap of stories).


Yes, so pleased you liked it! He is quite incredible isn’t he?

 

I did say I’d recommend his other comps, and there are two more I regard as essential - I hope you are now sufficiently in awe of his talent you will get straight on these, they are equally worthy of your time, and you can pick up the pair for less than £8:

 

The Visible Man - As I said there are precious few stories by Gardner Dozois so the compilations I’ve seen do tend to share stories, but this has enough that don’t appear in When The Great Days Come that it’s well worth reading (and if you read those two comps you can avoid Geodesic Dreams): 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00OA8HEGQ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?ie=UTF8&qid=&sr=

 

Slow Dancing Through Time - This is an anthology of short story collabs with other SF luminaries (including Pat Cadigan, Michael Swanwick and Jack Dann), and it’s wonderful. Not every story is SF by any means (it includes Down Amongst the Dead Men, an incredible slice of concentration camp horror), but it’s worth the price of admission alone for GD’s notes on the collaborative process on each story, and the collaborating authors’ stories about GD himself:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Slow-Dancing-Through-Gardner-Dozois-ebook/dp/B00O28EO5S/ref=nodl_

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On 15/05/2021 at 00:38, lolly said:

A Special Kind of Morning, Chains of the Sea, A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows, Morning Child


Also, I’d be interested to see what you thought of these four…for my money, even amongst Dozois’ own works these are the stand out works, I have read them so many times over the years as each one is so lyrical, and the breadth of ideas blows me away.

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2 hours ago, ZOK said:


Also, I’d be interested to see what you thought of these four…for my money, even amongst Dozois’ own works these are the stand out works, I have read them so many times over the years as each one is so lyrical, and the breadth of ideas blows me away.

Special Kind of Morning reminded me of  "the Forever War" by Joe Haldeman  for some reason, the juxtaposition of savagery and humanity is wonderfully realised,   it's actually one of the more uplifting stories.

 

I read Chains of the Sea pretty much after you mentioned it in a previous post- given your love of 100 years of Solitude I could absolutely see why it appealed to you, for me there's an ethereal quality to it as well as an ambiguity (as with a lot of the stories), liked it but it wasn't my favourite of the book.

 

A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows was a cracking final story , even when there's not much appearing to go on the writing, as you have pointed out, is so lyrical  and it's a pleasure to read even the most incidental of passages.I'm assuming inspiration from Asimov in it and it probably inspired Banks  to some extent and aspects of  Interstellar (the movie) appears to have borrowed heavily from it.

 

Morning Child  blew me away , anything  inspired by

Spoiler

The riddle of the Sphinx

and used so effectively   is going to be a winner. And the ending had me sitting there thinking "holy fuck"

 

Number of others, one mentioned previously , The Hanging Curve, was beautiful in it's relative simplicity and it poignant ending, maybe not the  most expansive story in the book but I loved it.

 

Recidivist ,  the 3rd story -as an introduction to the sort of " out there " ideas was fantastic and I loved the reality bending unexpectedness of it, it was like an acid trip  after the  relative normality  of the 1st two stories.

 

The Peacemaker was so low key and such a brutal, upsetting  ending.

 

I could offer a critique of every story in the book but this post would be huge. I can nearly guarantee  there there's at least one or two stories that people with like and as mentioned what looks like inspiration  from and for a number of other sci-fi books and movies  and often turns them on their head, aside from the fact that as you mentioned the writing is wonderfully lyrical and it's easy to blow through a story or two once you get started.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, lolly said:

Special Kind of Morning reminded me of  "the Forever War" by Joe Haldeman  for some reason, the juxtaposition of savagery and humanity is wonderfully realised,   it's actually one of the more uplifting stories.

 

I read Chains of the Sea pretty much after you mentioned it in a previous post- given your love of 100 years of Solitude I could absolutely see why it appealed to you, for me there's an ethereal quality to it as well as an ambiguity (as with a lot of the stories), liked it but it wasn't my favourite of the book.

 

A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows was a cracking final story , even when there's not much appearing to go on the writing, as you have pointed out, is so lyrical  and it's a pleasure to read even the most incidental of passages.I'm assuming inspiration from Asimov in it and it probably inspired Banks  to some extent and aspects of  Interstellar (the movie) appears to have borrowed heavily from it.

 

Morning Child  blew me away , anything  inspired by

  Reveal hidden contents

The riddle of the Sphinx

and used so effectively   is going to be a winner. And the ending had me sitting there thinking "holy fuck"

 

Number of others, one mentioned previously , The Hanging Curve, was beautiful in it's relative simplicity and it poignant ending, maybe not the  most expansive story in the book but I loved it.

 

Recidivist ,  the 3rd story -as an introduction to the sort of " out there " ideas was fantastic and I loved the reality bending unexpectedness of it, it was like an acid trip  after the  relative normality  of the 1st two stories.

 

The Peacemaker was so low key and such a brutal, upsetting  ending.

 

I could offer a critique of every story in the book but this post would be huge. I can nearly guarantee  there there's at least one or two stories that people with like and as mentioned what looks like inspiration  from and for a number of other sci-fi books and movies  and often turns them on their head, aside from the fact that as you mentioned the writing is wonderfully lyrical and it's easy to blow through a story or two once you get started.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Yes, I’d agree with a lot of that. Dozois has a quite unique take on SF I find, and it’s such a shame that he wrote so little - I think he really sweated these stories out, and he found writing collaborations much more his thing, as they played to his strengths as an editor too.

 

If you like The Peacemaker then I think you’ll love Executive Clemency that he wrote with Jack C. Haldeman II (Joe Haldeman’s older brother!), a very different story but with a very similar vibe and the structure of the ‘reveal’ is similar I think. It’s in the comp I mentioned above or you can read it here in someone’s scans of an old Omni from 1981:

 

http://www.williamflew.com/omni38a.html

 

Certainly not the best way to read it, but a real sense of time.

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On 18/02/2021 at 22:15, hungry joe said:

I've just ripped through "There Is No Antimemetics Division", which is sort of like Xcom meets Memento. It's short and only a couple of quid and really recommend it.

 

This was absolutely superb, couldn't put it down. It's been a while since I was excited and stimulated so much by the very concept of a story, but this has such a clever and thought-provoking central idea, and it's well-written and lighting paced to boot. My first and obvious reaction was that the likes of Alex Garland or Jonathan Glazer could make an extraordinary movie out of it.

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I bounced from that to Ed, which is shorter and just as nippy. Same kind of thing, individual anecdotes that give way to a broader story. Very little characterisation, more interested in big theoretical science ideas draped over a relatively thin narrative. Kind of feels like if you took the storyboard and narration from a Kurzgesagt video and dropped a couple of characters in. Still, highly recommended for anyone who digs anything like it.

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I finally got around to reading Station Eleven after seeing @little che mention it somewhere, and what a great read. Perfectly realised and self-contained, a refreshing treat.

 

Man alive though, what’s up with those two pages of the Station Eleven ‘comic’ they stuck in at the end? This is supposed to be Miranda’s life work, years of decisions and revisions, and it looks like something a first year art student threw together for a fiver. A cute idea, but what a way to ruin the images the reader’s mind has conjured of her work.

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On 06/06/2021 at 22:03, Sabreman said:

 

This was absolutely superb, couldn't put it down. It's been a while since I was excited and stimulated so much by the very concept of a story, but this has such a clever and thought-provoking central idea, and it's well-written and lighting paced to boot. My first and obvious reaction was that the likes of Alex Garland or Jonathan Glazer could make an extraordinary movie out of it.

 

I second this, although I haven't finished it all yet as I've been reading it via the SCP site. 

 

I think i'm two or three stories in (Kims) and it is really special to give me a general sense of wonder an intrigue as to what will happen next!

 

 

 

 

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An incredible author's bio:

 

 

 

Quote

An open letter to my fellow scifi/fantasy writers.

 

Dear, dear friends:

 

You are awful. All of you. (Yes, ALL OF YOU!)

 

Please do not take it personally. But someone has to tell you this, and it might as well be me.

 

You suffer from three key deficits: LACK OF IMAGINATION, LACK OF EMPATHY, and LACK OF SELF-AWARENESS.

 

First, your lack of IMAGINATION.

 

99% of scifi/fantasy novels can be categorized as follows:

 

a) "Hip", "Modern Day" Fantasy: "diverse" teenagers with magical powers fighting vampires in urban settings.

 

b) Teenagers suffering deprivation in a post-nuclear wasteland;

 

c) The so-called "epic" fantasy novel, with "world building" expecting you to learn the history of hundreds of characters, castles, cities and taverns like a History of Art exam.

 

d) Everyone fighting World War II again, in outer space; and

 

e) "Hard" scifi, with 500 pages of hand wringing and mental _asturbation about a transmission from an alien sphere (or... if you're feeling imaginative... an alien cube!).

 

Not only are these topics very, very trite, but your rendition of them is even worse. You're like a bad photocopy machine making worse and worse copies which themselves are bad copies of other copies.

 

Furthermore, the very dim lightbulb in your head is only bright enough to generate one idea (at most). So if you start out writing stories about Unicorns refighting WW II in outer space, ALL your stories will undoubtedly be about Unicorns refighting WW II in outer space. But, to make it last, you chop it up into nine or ten books with numbers in the title, each of them 250 pages long in big double space print. Maybe in one novel the Unicorn will have a battleship instead of a battlecruiser. Maybe in another the Unicorn will be wearing a funky helmet. But at its base, it will all be the same story. Hence your LACK OF IMAGINATION.

 

Now for your lack of EMPATHY.

 

People are easy to please. Really easy. We are all wired to sympathize and empathize with others. That's why we get such a thrill over "shipping", stories of complete strangers having a romance with each other. All you have to do is create characters which are real, relatable, and interesting, and readers will be hooked. It's in our very nature; it's like shooting fish in a barrel.

 

Unfortunately, you can't even find the barrel. Your characters are all two dimensional, put on this Earth to fulfill a quest. They are little more than video game avatars. Characters are defined by being multifaceted and their relationships to others. But you are clueless about this. You have no idea how to write characters that are interesting to people. All your characters are wooden, or worse, unpleasant, or EVEN WORSE, virtue whores. I'd love for my best friend to be very virtuous, kind, wise, and understanding. But I'd fall asleep reading a book about him. People don't want to read about kind best friends. They want to read about James Bond, Gandalf, and Mr. Spock, characters that are multifaceted and unusual. You don't even have the faintest idea how to create such characters (relating back to your LACK OF IMAGINATION).

 

Lastly, and most importantly, you lack SELF-AWARENESS. And what do I mean by that? You lack the self-awareness to write stories which are entertaining.

 

If you were to verbally tell someone a story, would you spend ten minutes describing a house or a barn, or what a room full of people were wearing, eating or drinking? Probably not, but you do see pages and pages of this kind of drek in scifi/fantasy novels all the time. My eyes glaze over such things, and I suspect many readers' do too.

 

The other most common sin writers are guilty of is character bloat, larding their stories with dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of characters, in the belief that populating their world so specifically makes their "world building" feel more "authentic".

 

It doesn't. It only confuses your readers. But you don't have the self-awareness to realize it.

 

Tell me, dear friends, when you write a page of dialog, do you ever go back and ask yourself if that page was entertaining, if people might ever want to reread that page even after reading it once? No, you never do. For you, dialog is simply something mechanical, to simply advance the plot, a means to an end rather than an end in itself. And that's why your writing is painfully stiff and pedantic.

 

So you write a story where nothing much happens, or maybe a lot happens, but either way you miss the primary point of the story itself--to show a series of dramatic effects on the main characters. Whether your story is "See Jim fly to the stars!" or "Watch Enrique and the Space Marines fight the aliens!" or "Sarah and Johnnie have to get back to the vault before the zombies wake up!", you miss the point of what makes a novel entertaining entirely. It's all about drama. Drama is not merely about things happening to characters, although things do happen to characters. Drama is where characters react to things happening to them in a way that is interesting and compelling. But you can't understand that, because you lack self-awareness.

 

Unfortunately, you have trained readers to expect bad writing. Readers now EXPECT they will have to plow through hundreds of pages of drek to get to a real story. You have TRAINED them to expect to struggle with your books to try to squeeze some relatable drama from it, and that is why I hate you the most, because you have crapified an entire field of literature. People have come to not only expect your drek, but to demand it!

 

And so when people, exposed only to a lifetime of your drek, stumble across my books like desert travelers to an oasis, their first reaction is often to blink rapidly and say "What Dat?"

 

Even from the covers, people can tell my books are different. They don't have meaningless one or two word titles like "Hard Impact" or "Final Conflict" and pictures of tiny stick figures in shadows that look like mannequins surrounded by random explosions. My book descriptions don't have any of the ten buzz phrases people are accustomed to seeing in a book description which say everything and nothing ("full of twists and turns which will keep you glued to your seat!")

 

And my books are about many different topics. As a result, my books will never be as popular as yours. People want predictability. They want same-ness. They want books with numbers in the title. They feel a fantasy novel can only be "epic" if it's hard to understand and a struggle to read. They want their WW II stories to be filled with stories of grunting space marines firing laser machine guns and throwing laser grenades on enemy positions. They want to read story after story after story about America turned into a desert wasteland filled with zombie mutants.

 

My stories, on the other hand, simply confuse them. They are about many different topics. There are no laser machine guns blazing away in page after page of meaningless battles between characters we have no reason to care about. My characters definitely are not politically correct. They may not even believe in man-made global warming or fifty four genders. I don't spend hundreds of pages talking about the clothes people are wearing, random nattering in restaurants, or the fabricated mechanics of faster than light travel. I'm more interested in writing about drama that effects people.

 

And that is why I will never sell as many books as you do.

 

Thanks so much for that, by the way. You should feel proud that you have lowered an entire genre to mediocrity.

 

It amazes me that I see all these things I describe above and none of you... none of you do. It's like living on a planet of blind painters, and I'm the only one whose noticed that you ran out of paint a long, long time ago.

 

********

 

My next book will be: "God's Middle Managers" and it will be AMAZING.

 

Wow, an author who never falls prey to any of those mistakes must be amazing!

 

... Right?

 

Spoiler

 

 

Some of the warnings on his books:

 

Quote

This 210,000 word book is very long and very easy reading. It has explicit love scenes and is not politically correct. It is not for Prudes or PC types.

 

Quote

Prudes, Politically Correct-Woke types and SJW's will ignore this warning and read the book anyway, in search of outrage.

 

Quote

Note: This book has a few descriptive love scenes, and is not politically correct. Snowflakes will melt.

 

 

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