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Sci Fi recommendations


marlonharewood

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Number of the Beast is literally the worst sci-fi book I have ever read in my life. And I've read L Ron's Mission Earth series at least three times. I'm hoping this new one is even worse. Gloriously worse.

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What makes this the best worst sci-fi book is unlike most bad sci-fi he's not just churning out shit for the money (Like say a Piers Anthony). He's pouring his heart and soul onto the page. These are his core beliefs in his later years. Nipples go sprung. The heroes both male and female are hyper competant and talk in clipped efficient sentences. They're great with machines. It's ok to want to fuck your mum

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  • 3 weeks later...

Reposted from the kindle deals thread because it's a bargain

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Science-Fiction-anthology-Philip-Dick-ebook/dp/B086QM12PX

 

two and a half thousand pages of sci-fi short stories for 99p.

 

The Sentimentalists, by Murray Leinster
The Girls from Earth, by Frank Robinson
The Death Traps of FX-31, by Sewell Wright
Song in a minor key, by C.L. Moore
Sentry of the Sky, by Evelyn E. Smith
Meeting of the Minds, by Robert Sheckley
Junior, by Robert Abernathy
Death Wish, by Ned Lang
Dead World, by Jack Douglas
Cost of Living, by Robert Sheckley
Aloys, by R.A. Lafferty
With These Hands, by C.M. Kornbluth
What is POSAT?, by Phyllis Sterling-Smith
A Little Journey, by Ray Bradbury
Hunt the Hunter, by Kris Neville
Citizen Jell, by Michael Shaara
Operation Distress, by Lester Del Rey
Syndrome Johnny, by Charles Dye
Psychotennis, anyone?, by Lloyd Williams
Prime Difference, by Alan Nourse
Doorstep, by Keith Laumer
The Drug, by C.C. MacApp
An Elephant For the Prinkip, by L.J. Stecher
License to Steal, by Louis Newman
The Last Letter, by Fritz Lieber
The Stuff, by Henry Slesar
The Celestial Hammerlock, by Donald Colvin
Always A Qurono, by Jim Harmon
Jamieson, by Bill Doede
A Fall of Glass, by Stanley Lee
Shatter the Wall, by Sydney Van Scyoc
Transfer Point, by Anthony Boucher
Thy Name Is Woman, by Kenneth O'Hara
Twelve Times Zero, by Howard Browne
All Day Wednesday, by Richard Olin
Blind Spot, by Bascom Jones
Double Take, by Richard Wilson
Field Trip, by Gene Hunter
Larson's Luck, by Gerald Vance
Navy Day, by Harry Harrison
One Martian Afternoon, by Tom Leahy
Planet of Dreams, by James McKimmey
Prelude To Space, by Robert Haseltine
Pythias, by Frederik Pohl
Show Business, by Boyd Ellanby
Slaves of Mercury, by Nat Schachner
Sound of Terror, by Don Berry
The Big Tomorrow, by Paul Lohrman
The Four-Faced Visitors of…Ezekiel, by Arthur Orton
The Happy Man, by Gerald Page
The Last Supper, by T.D. Hamm
The One and the Many, by Milton Lesser
The Other Likeness, by James Schmitz
The Outbreak of Peace, by H.B. Fyfe
The Skull, by Philip K. Dick
The Smiler, by Albert Hernhunter
The Unthinking Destroyer, by Roger Phillips
Two Timer, by Frederic Brown
Vital Ingredient, by Charles De Vet
Weak on Square Roots, by Russell Burton
With a Vengeance, by J.B. Woodley
Zero Hour, by Alexander Blade
The Great Nebraska Sea, by Allan Danzig
The Valor of Cappen Varra, by Poul Anderson
A Bad Day for Vermin, by Keith Laumer
Hall of Mirrors, by Frederic Brown
Common Denominator, by John MacDonald
Doctor, by Murray Leinster
The Nothing Equation, by Tom Godwin
The Last Evolution, by John Campbell
A Hitch in Space, by Fritz Leiber
On the Fourth Planet, by J.F. Bone
Flight From Tomorrow, by H. Beam Piper
Card Trick, by Walter Bupp
The K-Factor, by Harry Harrison
The Lani People, by J. F. Bone
Advanced Chemistry, by Jack Huekels
Sodom and Gomorrah, Texas, by R. A. Lafferty
Keep Out, by Frederic Brown
All Cats are Gray, by Andre Norton
A Problem in Communication, by Miles J. Breuer
The Terrible Tentacles of L-472, by Sewell Peaslee Wright
Marooned Under the Sea, by Paul Ernst
The Murder Machine, by Hugh B. Cave
The Attack from Space, by Captain S. P. Meek
The Knights of Arthur, by Frederik Pohl
And All the Earth a Grave, by C.C. MacApp
Citadel, by Algis Budrys
Micro-Man, by Weaver Wright

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The third and final book in Neal Asher's Jain trilogy came out today. I'm only a chapter or so in but this is what I like. Proper sci-fi weapon porn. Enemy ship a 1000 miles long capable of disrupting climates just by being near a planet. Rail gun magazines the size of cathedrals.

 

Yum.

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2 hours ago, Flub said:

The third and final book in Neal Asher's Jain trilogy came out today. I'm only a chapter or so in but this is what I like. Proper sci-fi weapon porn. Enemy ship a 1000 miles long capable of disrupting climates just by being near a planet. Rail gun magazines the size of cathedrals.

 

Yum.

Excellent! I haven't looked forward to a new book as much as this for a while! I'm currently re-reading the Charles Stross Saturn's Children books then I'll start a re-read of the Jain books before I start this

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On 06/05/2019 at 13:09, Hawklord said:

Interesting, I got the order from the wiki...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neal_Asher

 

On 06/05/2019 at 13:34, Flub said:

 

Hmm. I'm slightly confused now. Thinking about it I wouldn't place The Soldier and Warship after The Spatterjay series (There's a prador character I forgot shouldn't be there if so) but I certainly wouldn't put Soldier before the Technician. I swear the big thing that happens in the Technician is referenced in Soldier. Maybe my brain is playing tricks on me.

 

I doubt it matters much though :) Just carry on.

 

I'll tweet at Neal and see if we can get an answer :)

 

So Neal Asher has finally updated the reading order...

 

https://theskinner.blogspot.com/2020/04/where-do-i-start.html

 

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I finished it today. I'm not quite sure how well it links up to the future in the Spatterjay stuff but an enjoyable trilogy and a good further look at the Jain.

 

I'm curious as to what he's going to write in the universe next. The Jain (No spoiler) is still a threat but it's back to being containable for the most part as it was previously. I suspect we're going to see more of the Client given how he ended her part of the trilogy. It does seem a bit weird to now know all the details about jain tech and why it's so dangerous though. He needs a big threat for the polity to bounce off and I'm not sure where he goes next.

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I clocked Adrian Tchaikovsky's Cage Of Souls today. Pretty special I thought. Not exactly a compelling page turner, more like a sumptuous bath to languish in for an hour a day. Loved the New Sun vibes. When I think of these strange times, I'll always associate them with the reading of this book.

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I found out today that one of my fave sci fi books is now available in ebook form

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Ingathering-Complete-People-Stories-Henderson-ebook/dp/B0878RMD5D?s=digital-text

 

Ingathering: The Complete People Stories of Zenna Henderson

 

Zenna Henderson is best remembered for her stories of the People which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from the early 50s to the middle 70s. The People escaped the destruction of their home planet and crashed on Earth in the Southwest just before the turn of the century. Fully human in appearance, they possessed many extraordinary powers. Henderson’s People stories tell of their struggles to fit in and to live their lives as ordinary people, unmolested by fearful and ignorant neighbors. The People are “us at our best, as we hope to be, and where (with work and with luck) we may be in some future.”

Ingathering contains all seventeen of the People stories, including one, “Michal Without,” which has never before been published.

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Random note for any 40K fans out there, Games Workshop have started periodically discounting their Black Library series, and specifically quite a few of the omnibus editions have been going cheap. Right now you can get a few Dan Abnett series for cheap, including some of the Gaunt's Ghosts books and Eisenhorn which I've been meaning to read ever since reading the Ravenor omnibus about ten years ago. 

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On 18/02/2020 at 10:10, sir podger said:

 

I wish i could upvote this more. When the actual scifi is happening it's amazing, but then he goes off on a mundane side story that feels like an entire chapter is devoted uneccessarily to the whittling of small mural in a piece of wood on the floor in the back of a room that you'll never see again.

 

If this book was made into a film it would be like watching Dune and then it cuts away to an episode of columbo or pride and prejudice every now and again.

I kind of quite like that. The storytelling itself is ok. I mean his central premises for all the Commonwealth books are pretty interesting and brilliantly imaginative but despite all the massive world building everything ends up feeling a bit parochial. Like the same few people are integral to thousands of years of human development and two of the biggest events we go through as a species.  Reminds me a bit of how Star Wars after the original trilogy was made to feel like a small universe eventually. 
 

So the detailed asides give the universe a bit more to it. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I'm about half way through The Last Day by Andrew Hunter Murray. A decent, if slow-paced, dystopian thriller set in a near-future London. 

 

The World has stopped turning so half the planet live in permanent darkness and the other half live in permanent sunshine. The UK is in the goldilocks-zone where the sun shines all the time but people can still live and function. The book follows an oceanographer who works on an oil-rig tracking tidal patterns - she gets a call from her old college professor who tells her he needs to speak to her before he dies. She flies to London and is soon on the run from various government types as she tries to learn what her old prof. wanted to tell her.

 

This is a nice mix of Children of Men and The Drowned World but it's very slow. I'm over 50% into it and the plot has barely moved, I am enjoying it though. The world building is better than the story telling but the characters are good and I will stick with it to get to the reveal. 

 

 

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Finished The Last Day this morning. It was all right and there were some nice sections and twists in the last section but overall it dragged a little. I'd say Andrew Hunter Murray could be a good writer and I'll keep an eye out for future books. But I wouldn't recommend it except for real dystopia-fiction fiends. 

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Been trying to read some of the books I've accumulated over the last 25 or so years and never got around to reading. Am about half-way through Timelike Infinity by Stephen Baxter and really enjoying it. A combination of hard SF (time travel, quantum theory) and space opera, in the far future aliens have annexed the Earth, but some humans manage to get back to 1,500 years previously via a time portal. Just encountered a plot twist that made me want to read all night but my eyes weren't having it. 

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2 hours ago, Vimster said:

Been trying to read some of the books I've accumulated over the last 25 or so years and never got around to reading. Am about half-way through Timelike Infinity by Stephen Baxter and really enjoying it. A combination of hard SF (time travel, quantum theory) and space opera, in the far future aliens have annexed the Earth, but some humans manage to get back to 1,500 years previously via a time portal. Just encountered a plot twist that made me want to read all night but my eyes weren't having it. 

 

Stephen Baxter has quite a lot of books relating to that timeline. He built it into quite a good series of lightly connected novels.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xeelee_Sequence

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On 31/05/2020 at 08:35, pulsemyne said:

Finished Revenger last night by Alastair Reynolds. Enjoyable enough and a little differant with it being oldie pirate stuff crossed with sci fi. I'll be starting the second book Shadow Captiain tonight. 

 

I'll be interested to hear what you think about it, as Amazon reviews seemed to think it wasn't as good as Revenger. Which reminds me that I bought Revenger when it was going cheap a year or two ago and I should really read it, given that the last Reynolds book I read was House of Suns back in....2008. 

 

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Whilst I appreciate Watts for writing a very different kind of first-contact novel, it was completely opaque to me, even by the end. His recent book The Freeze-Frame Revolution looks interesting, but if it's in the same style then I may have to give it a pass.

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