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Gut wrenching scenes in movies


Major Britten
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I cry on cue in most good films. The only thing I'm impervious to is sentimental romance. But other kinds of sentimentality choke me up; the sodding feather at the end of Forrest Gump and the piano music that follows it. Every time. Actually you could just score The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with that standard depressing piano music and I'd be in fits of contemplative sorrow.

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Transformers: The Movie (the cartoon one) screwed me right up as a kid. A load of classic characters die at the start, then Prime goes, then Megatron, then Starscream, then Ultra Magnus. It was like a holocaust for the robots in disguise. One of the first movies I can remember seeing that left me upset.

Schindler's List got me at the end when Liam Neeson breaks down.

Other than that, I muscle through the emotions in true British spirit.

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Sorry, but I found that movie gut-wrenching throughout for a totally different reason - I thought it was possibly the most polished crap I've ever seen. It seemed to typify, to me, the type of movie that a snobby film buff would herald as brilliant just so they could tell people who don't like it that "it's beyond you, you just don't get it".

Well most of the movie is pretty boring imo but the payoff at the end is well worth it. It took me 3 attempts to watch the movie completley and see the ending (I usually just got to the bit where Smith returns to the camp and its snowing with people starving before I switched it off).

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The

funeral scene

in Serenity. Including the line

"Think she'll hold together? "She's tore up plenty, but she'll fly true." and it hits you that Wash is truly, truly dead.

Didn't make me cry, but did leave me pretty devastated. I still can't believe it happens.

Well most of the movie is pretty boring imo but the payoff at the end is well worth it. It took me 3 attempts to watch the movie completley and see the ending (I usually just got to the bit where Smith returns to the camp and its snowing with people starving before I switched it off).

I quite enjoyed it. But then I had just finished a book about it: "Love and Hate in Jamestown" or something, and it's entirely possible that the book coloured my reaction to the film.

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Also the end of the Truman Show.

When you realise Truman's overcome his fear of water and is trying to get free...

:'(

Oh, man. That's one of my favourite movie moments ever. I remember going to see it with my wife when she was at university, and there weren't too many people in the cinema - it was mainly kids with their parents and they were wondering why Jim Carrey wasn't doing any silly faces and why it wasn't actually that funny. And then the bit where he somehow finds the strength to raise the mast with the beautiful score by Philip Glass in the background...gets me every time. And then the bit where he's trying to break through the wall, pathetically slapping it with his hands. And then he elbows it...suddenly he sort of half-collapses, you can't quite see his face, but then he turns round and he looks crushed, heartbroken and terrified at the same time. :)

Brilliant, brilliant film. I don't think it was even nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, which is crazy.

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Brilliant, brilliant film. I don't think it was even nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, which is crazy.

No, it wasn't. But it was nominated for Best Director, Best Supporting Actor and Best Screenplay, so it's not all bad. And it was a fairly heavyweight year for Best Picture nominations (except maybe Elizabeth, which is still pretty excellent).

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Red Road

There's a scene were a bereaved mum fills her dead kids clothes with rolled up clothes and stuff as padding and then hugs it as if it were the child.

It's the most utterly heartbreaking thing I have ever seen in a film. Had me and the missus in tears.

Jesus. This sounds horrible. That would get me, definitely :)

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There's an episode of Star Trek: Voyager in which the holographic doctor has created a holographic family for himself, and one of the crew members complains to him because it's all too nice and perfect so he asks the computer to make it more realistic.

At the end of the episode, his holo-daughter has a terrible accident and he has to watch her die and say goodbye in the holo-hospital and I broke down horribly in front of my entire family for a good ten minutes.

Yes, I know. Star Trek: Voyager...

EDIT: Actually, any film that deals with robots/aliens/holograms/toys/toasters etc. who want to be or are convinced they are human usually bring a tear to my eye.

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Well, the end of "Brokeback Mountain", for certain, although the first time I saw it, the bit that had me blubbing was when they have their big argument, the last time they meet. Second time, the ending had me in bits.

The bit when he takes the clothes from the wardrobe totally destroys me. I had to stop the DVD the first time I saw it.

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Right at the end of LotR: RotK, when the Hobbits are

saying goodbye to the Elves, and then you realise Gandalf is going with them, and the hobbits will never see him again, and then you realise that Frodo is going too, and Sam has to say goodbye to him, totally unprepared, after having had this enormous life-changing adventure with him, and he'll never have the opportunity to grow older with him, and be able to sit in the pub talking about their adventures, and Frodo won't be able to see Sam's children grow up...

Got a lump in my throat just writing about it.

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Right at the end of LotR: RotK, when the Hobbits are

saying goodbye to the Elves, and then you realise Gandalf is going with them, and the hobbits will never see him again, and then you realise that Frodo is going too, and Sam has to say goodbye to him, totally unprepared, after having had this enormous life-changing adventure with him, and he'll never have the opportunity to grow older with him, and be able to sit in the pub talking about their adventures, and Frodo won't be able to see Sam's children grow up...

Got a lump in my throat just writing about it.

On a similar note, also in LotR: RotK,

during the siege of Minas Tirith, When the Rohirrim arrive and charge into the Orcs...

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Good lord. Even reading this thread and some of the scenes being described is making me well up.

To add a couple more: It's not the very end of Schindler's List that got me, it was the bit where Schindler breaks down after they are saved, saying he could have saved more. IIRC, doesn't Ben Kinglsey comfort him. Broke me in the cinema that did.

First Blood - John's speech at the end in the police station. That really gets to me.

Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring - Right at the end, when Frodo tells Sam he's going alone. And Sam won't let him. I knew this was coming, having read the book and all that, but the way it's done in the film, Sean Astin's absolute doggedness to follow him even though he would die by drowning in the process, the absolute love and devotion and loyalty communicated in that dogged march through the water, the clawing when he is sinking, still trying to reach his best friend... Well, it gets me every time.

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There's a scene in the phenomenal Spanish film, Sex and Lucia, where the parents of a dead child are reunited and the mother finally comes to terms with the loss. Having never really dealt with the accident, they both break down massively. But they're not completely morbid tears, for you know that the reunification will be the start of their reparation process. It fuses happy and sad tears for a complete blubfest extravaganza.

God damn that scene gets me every time. I can't recommend the film highly enough.

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Oh, man. That's one of my favourite movie moments ever. I remember going to see it with my wife when she was at university, and there weren't too many people in the cinema - it was mainly kids with their parents and they were wondering why Jim Carrey wasn't doing any silly faces and why it wasn't actually that funny. And then the bit where he somehow finds the strength to raise the mast with the beautiful score by Philip Glass in the background...gets me every time. And then the bit where he's trying to break through the wall, pathetically slapping it with his hands. And then he elbows it...suddenly he sort of half-collapses, you can't quite see his face, but then he turns round and he looks crushed, heartbroken and terrified at the same time. :D

Brilliant, brilliant film. I don't think it was even nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, which is crazy.

It's the shot not long before he raises the mast, where Ed Harris's character realises he's lost Truman but is quietly goading him on and Paul Giamatti chokes back tears as he's asked to hit him with increasingly severe weather that does it for me.

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Has anyone mentioned Monsters Inc? Jesus Christ, I've only seen it once and refused to watch it again. The part where they smash the door up so Sully won't get back, then later Mike having rebuilt it for him. Just cried and cried and cried.

Another one that got me - Harry Potter & The Goblet of Fire - Not when Cedric is killed but then Harry brings his body back, the look and actions of his father (George Dent off of Drop The Dead Donkey) was just horribly sad.

That Red Road one got me and I've never even seen the film (nor will I now).

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The end of El Orphanato. Spent the whole film terrified out of my wits and trying to hide behind the person next to me, and was totally unprepared for that ending.

The ending would pop into my head for days afterwards and everytime I'd get a shiver.

Has anyone mentioned Monsters Inc? Jesus Christ, I've only seen it once and refused to watch it again. The part where they smash the door up so Sully won't get back, then later Mike having rebuilt it for him. Just cried and cried and cried.

That Red Road one got me and I've never even seen the film (nor will I now).

Good call on Monsters Inc. but you should give The Red Road a go as it is a fantastic film.

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