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On 4/5/2020 at 5:14 PM, bear said:

It's hard to look beyond a Bialetti. I'm sure there are technically better pots out there but the big advantage of the Bialetti is that it's much easier to get replacement seals as they are so ubiquitous. 

 

I've got a small one, 3 cup I think, in red because that was cheaper than the stainless steel. 

 

It's fine but I generally prefer to use the Aeropress or a pour over. It makes very strong coffee and because it's a metal filter its tends to be a bit bitter. 

Often I drink this at a friend's place, it's great coffee. I'm planning on getting one, too.

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Anyone made those whipped coffees off of the internet yet? Not bad as a cocktail. 

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On 13/04/2020 at 01:50, Chooch said:

Anyone made those whipped coffees off of the internet yet? Not bad as a cocktail. 

Link? 

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1 hour ago, Thor said:

Link? 

image.thumb.jpeg.23b4d965d4d69973a12ec009937888d1.jpeg
 

I just add a shot of Tia Maria I had in the cupboard. 

 

2 tablespoons of instant

2 tablespoons of granulated sugar 

2 tablespoons of boiling water

 

whip until it gets really thick and creamy.

 

spoon on top of half a glass of iced milk. 
 

booze optional. 

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25 minutes ago, Chooch said:

2 tablespoons of granulated sugar

U FUCKING WOT, M8? :lol:

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20 minutes ago, Thor said:

U FUCKING WOT, M8? :lol:

Do iiiiiiit

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I am not putting TWO TABLESPOONS of sugar into a coffee! :lol:

 

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I think it’s coffee in the same way Tiramisu is, really. 
 

 

It’s basically a milky variant of Vietnamese Egg coffee, which itself was created because milk was rationed during the war - skip to 3:30 here:

 

 

I’d love to try this. Not so much the Dalgona coffee. 

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Missing decent shop coffee so bought some pre packed stuff from my favourite. Holy shit I was blown away by taste of the coffee. I used cafetière, first attempt was too weak but 2nd was just right.

 

Really recommend this place, they fresh roast everything on sundays . It’s Indonesian style and they get all the beans from there.

 

https://www.ngopi.co.uk

 

 

 

 

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My wife treated us to a new coffee machine, it's a sage barista express bean to cup one, it's very good (if slightly inconsistent on the grind). 

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Sage/Breville do seem to make very good coffee equipment for a company that is not primarily coffee focused. I saw a video by the Seattle Coffee Gear channel about how to get the most out of the Express that might be useful to you.

 

My kitchen scales have broken, which is slightly annoying as my brews are all over the place while I wait for the replacement set to show up, but I did try making some iced coffee the other day before they went kaput, brewing 60% of the water into 40% ice and then adding more ice to serve it. It was pretty strong initially but as the ice melted it was very good. Much better than a hot cup in the middle of the afternoon.

 

d8d1O0ol.jpg

 

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I've been loving the cold brew lately myself. I just coarse grind into this filter mug I bought (not available right now but there must be others like it), leave it in the fridge overnight and then add ice to drink.

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Isn’t that just a French Press?

 

Coffee wise, I’ve gone back to Pact as they’re offering 50% off your first five bags for NHS workers, but Origin’s 20% off is still on, which puts their cheapest stuff at £6 a bag and it’s great. 

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The cold brew fridge ones look like a French Press but have a filter inside. They make a decent summer drink although my 13 year old keeps on stealing mine before I get to it :)

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It's basically a really big plastic cafetiere with a second lid that just seals the top, so you can leave everything to steep without shit falling in or stinking it up. Once it's done you swap on the press lid and press it, and it's got a little button-operated seal on the spout to keep everything fresh- like one of those coffee carafes you get at meetings.

 

I could do the same with a plastic milk jug and a big cafetiere but this works very nicely.

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This is a really boring post if you're not into coffee, but then why would you be here?

 

Anyway:

 

I had no need to go beyond my Square Mile filter subscription, and was happily brewing pourovers with a V60. 

 

But eventually during this  lockdown I suddenly I was really missing flat whites and was getting a little bored of the filters.

 

So I bought some Red Brick from Square Mile with a view to go back on the Aeropress that I've not touched in ages. Then my grinder broke...

 

I ended spending quite a ridiculous amount on a new grinder but as something that is getting daily use now, and even not having it for one day was bad enough, I figured it's worth it. All the coffee nerd advice I had ever heard always put the most stock in the grinder above any other equipment. 

 

Anyway, it's not supposed to be an espresso grinder as such, but dialling it all the way in, it's produced a really really good shot from an Aeropress. At least it hit the spot for me. It's really brought out a lot of flavours. So now I'm on a mission to figure out the best way to get an espresso shot from an Aeropress, in terms of how much coffee to use, how much time to do it all in, what to set the grinder to.  

 

But I'm quite impressed with the quality of the grind actually. And James Hoffman did say it was good. I don't actually know how much influence he has over Square Mile's range but I took it as a strong recommendation by way of the fact that they were actually selling it - their equipment range is very deliberately narrow. 

 

Now I've thought about it, for all I know my old grinder was on the way out for a while, the bit holding the burr in had come apart. So possibly it was doing a terrible grind even for filter, so I'm excited to try a filter grind with it. That'll have to wait until tomorrow now though, I'm absolutely buzzing my tits off after the little espresso experiment session.

 

 

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Is that the Wilfa Svart, then? Or the Uniform? I think the latter is a proper espresso grinder but costs three times as much.

 

There are loads of different methods for getting an espresso style shot out of an aeropress - they tend to vary quite a bit in method and what they prioritise, in terms of crema, thickness, strength, etc. I think it probably depends what you’re looking for. A metal filter might get you some extra oils.

 

A cheap moka pot will probably do you one better.

 

I bought a v60 the other day. So far I’m finding I need a much finer grind than my aeropress. I haven’t got it quite right yet, but am keen to play around with it. Doing a pourover isn’t as much faff as I thought, either. Broadly as much effort as an aeropress and I can do more than one cup at a time, which is nice.

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I got the Wilfa Uniform. It's not a 'proper' Espresso grinder (at least from what Hoffman said) but he also said that it basically could do a decent espresso. His review was that if you are pulling shots daily, it's probably better to invest in a 'proper' one. I think that makes sense, it seemed to complain and not actually grind very well on the finest setting, i.e. 1-2 struggled to actually grind at all, which was odd. But then a 4 did a really nice, even and fine grind. And besides i'm not testing in a proper espresso machine - it's good enough for me, way better than my last Baratza Encore did on the finest setting.

 

I find a 'medium' grind was best for a V60, at least on old grinders. As in, somewhere in the middle of the dial. I thought you wanted course, so i'm a little surprised you're saying finer than aeropress. I think maybe it depends how you like your filter. 

 

Personally I always drank it a little 'thin', but just made sure to bloom first, and pour really slowly. The advice given to me from someone at Square Mile (they are a client of my last company. I've met James Hoffman briefly a few times!) was to gradually dial it in and dial it in,  so you notice the moment you start to taste bitterness - at that point it's probably just past the max extraction you're going to want, assuming you drink your filters black, and are after a longer cup of coffee.

 

My target was always a cup of coffee that is tangy & fruity, almost refreshing. Not bitter or heavy, the way cafetieres are, but depends on what you're after of course.  

 

I really love doing a pourover in the morning though. It's a nice wakeup ceremony. Doing it has not gotten old since I learned about it. The people in my old job introduced me to it, it was kinda mindblowing to realise how a mug of black coffee could taste.

 

 

 

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I think I probably like my coffee more like yourself than a lot of people on here. I like the acidity and depth of a lot of lighter roasts.

 

I normally have my Sage grinder set to in the drip range when making my aeropress (inverted method with a 1 minute steep, which might be why I use a relatively coarse grind). That works well. I started off there with my v60 and got a very weak result, went three full stops finer and it still wasn’t enough and then another full three, which takes me into “percolator” range and I got a decent cup but I had some of that bitterness and astringency coming through, which is where you want to go back a bit on the grind, as you say. By that point, I’d had far too much coffee and will probably leave it until tomorrow to play around some more, going back by either half or a full click until I get a cup I like. 
 

 

And by then I’ll be onto a new bag of coffee and have to dial it in all over again!

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The stars aligned and I seem to have produced a banger of a cup from my V60. Probably not a coincidence that I changed the filter on the Brita this morning.

 

I do seem to get a lot of grounds stuck to the side of the filter though. Is this a problem and is there an easy way to get them off? I stir as per Hoffmann’s instructions but it doesn’t seem to do much about them:

 

OxdPSx6.jpg

 

 

@cowfields You probably don’t need it now, but if you properly get into espresso in future, might be worth checking if you can adjust your top burr. My grinder has 60 steps (with half steps in between), but you can open it up and adjust the top burr to give you 10 smaller increments for each and every step, which is a bit crazy. Apparently this is for when you do espresso and need to make tiny adjustments.

 

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2 hours ago, HarryBizzle said:

The stars aligned and I seem to have produced a banger of a cup from my V60. Probably not a coincidence that I changed the filter on the Brita this morning.

 

I do seem to get a lot of grounds stuck to the side of the filter though. Is this a problem and is there an easy way to get them off? I stir as per Hoffmann’s instructions but it doesn’t seem to do much about them:

 

OxdPSx6.jpg

 

 

@cowfields You probably don’t need it now, but if you properly get into espresso in future, might be worth checking if you can adjust your top burr. My grinder has 60 steps (with half steps in between), but you can open it up and adjust the top burr to give you 10 smaller increments for each and every step, which is a bit crazy. Apparently this is for when you do espresso and need to make tiny adjustments.

 


How much coffee is in the filter?

I swirl mine when it's at the highest point and it doesn't have anywhere near as much stuck to the sides, but I'm never using more than 20g

The Brita Filter thing is shit, I'm not going to boil my kettle with the water that comes out of our taps because it will be crusted over with barnacles within a week but the brita strips out all the stuff that carries the extraction. I did have some of those filters that put magnesium and calcium into the water but I'm not sure that gave as much benefit as using bottled water.

I'm still using the brita and I can get a good cup most of the time. My grinder is probably letting me down the most, but just going slow and getting the temperature right seems to get me where I want to be.

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3 hours ago, HarryBizzle said:

The stars aligned and I seem to have produced a banger of a cup from my V60. Probably not a coincidence that I changed the filter on the Brita this morning.

 

I do seem to get a lot of grounds stuck to the side of the filter though. Is this a problem and is there an easy way to get them off? I stir as per Hoffmann’s instructions but it doesn’t seem to do much about them:

 

OxdPSx6.jpg

 

 

@cowfields You probably don’t need it now, but if you properly get into espresso in future, might be worth checking if you can adjust your top burr. My grinder has 60 steps (with half steps in between), but you can open it up and adjust the top burr to give you 10 smaller increments for each and every step, which is a bit crazy. Apparently this is for when you do espresso and need to make tiny adjustments.

 

 

I mean the grind on that looks so fine that I can't imagine you can avoid a bit of sticking. I'll take a photo of mine but I grind a lot coarser for v60. 

 

Not that there's anything wrong with it of course, I'm just saying. Also, pour a lot slower I guess? If you're never filling up the water level to much higher than the grounds it's never draining and pulling down along the sides. I try to avoid filling it up at all and fill as close to the drip speed as possible. Depends on how much I'm concentrating, mind. 

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@Gaz That’s a 30g batch. I think I forgot to swirl this one at the end, so that might be it. 
 

@cowfields I’m using Hoffmann’s method, which is a 45 second bloom then 60% of water in thirty seconds and then the remaining in the last 30 seconds. 
 

I don’t have a pouring kettle, but manage to pour quite a fine stream of water slow enough that I had to pour a little faster to get it all in in that time frame. 
 

Final brew time was about 2m45s. Tasted very good though, so I’m not overly worried if I don’t manage to get that stuff off the sides. 
 

 

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On 13/06/2020 at 15:33, cowfields said:

I mean it tasting great is in theory the goal here :D

 

This is true, but the never ending pursuit of the perfect cup of coffee is a slippery slope.

 

The V60 is interesting. I finally understand why Coffee People never stop banging on about preheating everything they touch - it produces a relatively cool in comparison to the Aeropress which produces a cup of coffee hotter than the sun and pre-cooling your mug might actually be reasonable.

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I tried a method with aeropress that I really like:

 

- Don't use inverted

- Filter in bottom as normal

- tamp down a filter *on top* of the coffee, so basically there's a filter above and below. I have a sainsburys paper curry powder jar, covered in clingfilm to avoid taste going through! But it's the right width so it fits down the shaft of the aeropress. With that I can apply a filter on top of the grounds and tamp it down so it's a compressed ish puck.

 

Then you put hot water on top. Thanks to the top filter, the water just sits there and doesn't fall through into the mug. Push the plunger down the normal way, but it's really difficult, the filter / tamped coffee means that there's a lot of resistance as you compress the air. 

 

It's nowhere near the pressure of a real espresso, but I guess it's pressure that produces a great espresso like shot. Tastes really great, add a bit of warm milk and it's hitting that flat white desire for me. 

 

Plus it's also kinda fun to do!

 

 

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Apart from the milk, which is to be expected with your username, I am up for trying that out. Perhaps tomorrow as I have already had enough coffee today.

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I had a few beans left over from my last bag so made a tiny batch (~150mL) of cold brew and it was really quite nice. 
 

Almost like iced tea. Very smooth and caremelly. I can see why people like it so much, but also take The Hoff’s point that it masks the origin characteristics of the coffee. I’d be interested to try it with some non specialty coffee. 
 

 

I also recently got a bag of natural processed coffee and it really is something. So earthy!

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Oops, didn't know there was a dedicated coffee thread. I've just made a post in Ask the Forum about which coffee machine to buy.

 

Basically I mostly drink whatever coffee jar my wife buys during the weekly shop, or, when we were allowed to go places, lattes from Starbucks/Costa etc. I don't really drink anything fancy.

 

Not sure whether to go pod, bean to cup, filter or what.

 

Budget £150-200 max.

 

Any recommedations?

 

 

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