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Balls, just realised I've missed the Cildo Meireles exhibition at Tate Modern. I'm not normally into modern art and wanky installations but this one sounded really good- cool to look at as well as being fairly interactive.

I think a new years resolution of mine is to go to more art galleries/exhibitions etc. And discover some new favourite artists. :(

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Balls, just realised I've missed the Cildo Meireles exhibition at Tate Modern. I'm not normally into modern art and wanky installations but this one sounded really good- cool to look at as well as being fairly interactive.

I think a new years resolution of mine is to go to more art galleries/exhibitions etc. And discover some new favourite artists. :(

Aye, it was very good. This room was the highlight for me just for the sheer otherness of it all. Very surreal walking in and your mind never really adapts - almost dreamlike.

If you can afford it, and go down to London (or Liverpool/St Ives) regularly, it may be worth becoming a Tate member. I paid £50 for 15 months, you get magazines and bits & pieces through the post and unlimited entrance to any exhibitions. It encourages you to check out new things (I likely wouldn't have gone to the Meireles exhibition without having the membership) and am planning to head down again next month for the Rodchenko & Popova display at the Modern, as well as the Tate Triennial and Van Dyck exhibitions.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The Barber Institute in Birmingham (on the campus of the University of Birmingham) is my favourite art gallery. It's one of the most significant private galleries in Europe yet is free to have a wander round. Really great collection focusing on more classic stuff.

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I visited the pompadou in December, they had an incredible Jacques Villegle exhibition on the top floor which combined with the museum of modern art and the views across Paris makes it well worth a visit.

In London, Elms Lesters is always worth a visit both for their great artists and the incredible building.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Oh, nice one, thanks. I'll see if I can persuade the missus to go to Liverpool at half term. I'm sure she needs a passport or something.

Well, I went on Saturday, and enjoyed it. The Blake exhibition was quite small (just a single room), which was a bit disappointing, although it was great to see some of his drawings and paintings up close. The paintings were much smaller than I was expecting. His anatomy was awful, wasn't it? But his composition was fantastic. There was one drawing on the wall that could have come straight out of a 1960s Marvel comic.

The real treat was an exhibition (which you had to pay for - boo!) by a painter called Glenn Brown. Being the ignorant philistine that I am, I'd never heard of the guy, and from the images in the flyer for the exhibition I thought it he just messed about with paintings with a photoshop Smudge tool, but we paid and went for a look anyway. I was absolutely gobsmacked by the paintings themselves. Really incredible. Some of them had a genuine physical effect on my body when I looked at them closely. Not an emotional respones, but a purely physical, nauseous reaction. Well worth a look if you're up in Liverpool.

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Anything good in London just now? Meant to be down either next week or the week after. I'm mainly interested in photography and new media.

There's a big Picasso exhibition on at the National Gallery, beginning this Wednesday until June. It was previously on in Paris, and concerns itself mostly with comparing his work to the old masters and Renaissance art. The Paris show would have been incredible in that they showed the Picasso version of a Velazquez painting, side-by-side, but the London one is 100% Picasso's work. I think they've reproduced his "source" material in a booklet at the show, however. It's work from right throughout his career. Pretty essential viewing, I'm sure.

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), arguably the most influential artist of the 20th century, pitted himself against the greatest Masters of European painting in a life-long artistic dialogue. ‘Picasso: Challenging the Past’ explores the ways he took up the artistic concerns of the painters of the past and made audacious responses of his own.

Picasso was a passionate student of the grand tradition of European painting. El Greco, Velázquez and Goya were of crucial importance to him, as were Rembrandt, Delacroix, Ingres, Manet and Cézanne. All of these artists are represented by major paintings at the National Gallery.

Displaying some 60 works by the artist, this exhibition invites visitors to re-explore the National Gallery’s permanent collection in light of Picasso’s fascination with the Old Masters.

The exhibition is organised thematically, showing how Picasso repeatedly returned to the great subjects of the European painting tradition, analysing them as his personal style developed in myriad directions. Sections include self portraits, the Spanish tradition of male portraiture, the female nude, still life, and the seated female figure.

‘Picasso: Challenging the Past’ culminates in a display of the artist’s Variations where, late in life, Picasso makes direct reference to masterpieces such as Velázquez’s ‘Las Meninas’ and Manet’s ‘Déjeuner sur l’Herbe’, turning them into “something else entirely”.

Wow. His later works were really panned at their initial unveiling. They're saying in reviews of this show and the one in Paris that it's only now that people are growing to appreciate them.

But, seriously... Picasso wrestling with the incredible conundrum of Velazques's 'Las Meninas.' You know you're in for some mind-bending awesomeness there.

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Well, I went on Saturday, and enjoyed it. The Blake exhibition was quite small (just a single room), which was a bit disappointing, although it was great to see some of his drawings and paintings up close. The paintings were much smaller than I was expecting. His anatomy was awful, wasn't it? But his composition was fantastic. There was one drawing on the wall that could have come straight out of a 1960s Marvel comic.

The real treat was an exhibition (which you had to pay for - boo!) by a painter called Glenn Brown. Being the ignorant philistine that I am, I'd never heard of the guy, and from the images in the flyer for the exhibition I thought it he just messed about with paintings with a photoshop Smudge tool, but we paid and went for a look anyway. I was absolutely gobsmacked by the paintings themselves. Really incredible. Some of them had a genuine physical effect on my body when I looked at them closely. Not an emotional respones, but a purely physical, nauseous reaction. Well worth a look if you're up in Liverpool.

Excellent, thanks for the impressions. Disappointing that the Blake exhibition is so slow but looking forward to it nonetheless.

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  • 1 month later...
But, seriously... Picasso wrestling with the incredible conundrum of Velazques's 'Las Meninas.' You know you're in for some mind-bending awesomeness there.

I went to this earlier today and the Variations room was the highlight, some stunning paintings. His work on The Rape of the Sabine Women was particularly good, this painting was horrific in it's own overblown way. Was a shame that it doesn't have the originals or reproductions nearby but from what I read the Paris show was a bit of a sprawling mess due to the amount of paintings on show; they were all generally viewable on the little portable touch-screen guides (which cost extra, natch).

Having only really been familiar with his Cubist work I never appreciated the range of his skills before either; this portrait of Olga, one of his partners, which was on show was finished the same time as some of his more experimental work - it's an incredible painting.

Might start a new thread after some sleep, seems a shame to ghettoise everything in here - especially for such a blockbuster show (I got to the National Gallery at 10am and it was pretty busy then, they were queuing to get in when I left the exhibition about an hour and a half later...). Really inspiring stuff, would be interested to hear others thoughts if anyone else has been?

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  • 3 weeks later...

am totally gonna check out that picasso exhibition now, thanks guys.

If anyone fancies, a bit of an odd one, theres a smallish gallery on the wirral, the Lady Lever Gallery, built by lord leverhulme for his wife, has alsorts exhibited there, in a beautiful building in a lovely little village called port sunlight (he also built the villiage for his workers) its on my doorstep, so ive been round it hundreds of times. But if your ever in the area check it out.

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Just thought I'd mention I've been to the Rodchenko / Popova exhibition (at the Tate Modern) about 10 times now and I can still spend more and more time there, perfectly displayed and a fantastic selection of work.

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Wow, it really is startling (The portrait).

pow_377x505.jpg

The browns are beautiful.

Who is the portrait of?

My lecturer would say that the browns used were used to represent modesty. Or something.

I'm getting right in to portraits at the mo, and art critisism. Not that I know anything about it, or can spell it! Semi related - I've just read a book on art in alchemy. Amazing pics, full of allegory and symbolism. (Astrology, Magic and Alchemy in Art by Matilde Battistini fact fans) http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&tag=rllmukforumco-21&linkCode=ur2&camp=1634&creative=6738&location=http://www.amazon.co.uk/Astrology-Magic-Al...y/dp/0892369078 - if anyones interested.

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Who is the portrait of?

My lecturer would say that the browns used were used to represent modesty. Or something.

Olga Picasso. At the exhibition there's a portrait of her near the end of their relationship, and it's such a sharp contrast:

3379408672_1d5d5eeb6e_o.jpg

Feels incredibly cold and harsh in comparison - so distant and blank; it's pointed out that the fur on her collar resemble barbs or needles.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Can anyone recommend some more art galleries in the capital? I'm heading down to London early June but I've been to all the major galleries I'm interested in and will be too early for the new temporary exhibitions at the Tate Galleries.

I did think about the Estorick Colleciton of Modern Italian Art as I'm a fan of Futurism (despite all it's mad fascist leanings), anyone been before?

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just to reply to my own post, I went to the Kuniyoshi exhibition at The Royal Academy in the end and thought it was superb; anyone else been? It closed today I'm afraid for any who hadn't. The imagination on display as well as the sheer artistry was rather breathtaking (this picture in particular of a warrior committing Hari-Kari by detonating a landmine was incredible, I spent about 5 minutes looking at it). I'm no great scholar on Japanese art but I'm sure it would have been particularly interesting to fans of Manga, as I could see so many parallels between his work and modern stuff - hard to believe that some were over 150 years old actually. There's a couple more pictures here if anyone is interested, these ones stood out when I was there - 1, 2, 3

There's quite a bit of new stuff at the Tate Modern since May too, including a new "Energy and Process" area on Level 5 as well as some works from Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons that I haven't seen displayed before. There's a room devoted to scale too, which has Robert Therrien's "Table and Four Chairs" sculpture which, as I love oversized art, was good to see in person.

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I went yesterday morning too. Yes, what struck me was the dynamism and colour in all of the pieces. So much energy and power, even in the more tranquil prints.

UtagawaKuniyoshi%20ThePriestNicherinInTheSnow%20c1831%20WashburnUniversity_KS.jpg

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He even managed to make snow colourful.

63visrev_156468s.jpg

What I also liked was how a lot of his prints were set very early in the morning - on a lot of his outdoor scenes you could see the rez haze of the rising sun burning through the sky:

Kuniyoshi-Asahina-Saburo--006.jpg

GIS isn't turning up much more, unfortunately.

I was less keen on his fantastical things - the sexual stuff and the comic stuff, for example.

Another interesting thing was that this was supposed to be very pro-protectionist stuff, but there was so much European influence on display.

Did you see the super-cute girl outside handing out flyers? If not, they were for the Japanese Gallery in Islington. They've got a Kuniyoshi print sale on if you're interested.

www.japanesegallery.co.uk

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Can anyone recommend some more art galleries in the capital? I'm heading down to London early June but I've been to all the major galleries I'm interested in and will be too early for the new temporary exhibitions at the Tate Galleries.

I did think about the Estorick Colleciton of Modern Italian Art as I'm a fan of Futurism (despite all it's mad fascist leanings), anyone been before?

Too late to answer, but yes, the Estorick is a lovely little gallery. I like the Dulwich Picture Gallery too (the Sickert in Venice, which you just missed, was good, and the American art last summer was excellent. If you like Baroque, or lots of mad Japanese arms and armour, the Wallace Collection is worth a visit. Have we already mentioned Sir John Soane's Museum?

Just to reply to my own post, I went to the Kuniyoshi exhibition at The Royal Academy in the end and thought it was superb; anyone else been? It closed today I'm afraid for any who hadn't.

I tried last week, only to find it closed for the afternoon for some reason while the woman from Kenickie and Andrew Graham-Dixon talked outside to cameras. :lol:

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