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The Dark Knight Rises - Summer 2012 - New Trailer Post #1230


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Still unhinged enough to think that faking his own death and allowing (for no reason cos he lets him into it later) the man who's cared for him all his life and has been in tears through the whole of the film, begging him to get away and have a proper life, to weep in abject sorrow and dismay over the crushing failure he's been over the graves of everyone he's ever known and loved, without even phoning him up/sending a signal to let him know not to kill himself or die of a coronary or just give up on life altogether at his advanced age, in a pit of grief and depression? No, better to wait for him to go on holiday abroad next, plan to be in just the right spot at the right time in a café only once described briefly to him, which of course Alfred would definitely go to as I'm sure he'd still be thinking 'well, the dead Wayne will probably still turn up anyway, might as well have that holiday again', just to flash him a cheeky grin and Alfred, having been duped into profound despair will be like, 'tee hee, well done master Bruce!'.

I have to say I really disagree with this.

I didn't really care about the logic behind the ending scene outside the cafe or what a coincidence it must have been for it to happen, and I don't think it was supposed to be taken literally. I was just happy that Alfred got his wish and that Batman was able to move on. But that's just me, not saying you're wrong!

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I'd agree. the film was so remorselessly bleak I welcomed that scene; a scene the audience AND Alfred wished for.

Minor niggles. The complete lack of one character did make me think when he was going to feature again as the runtime continued and the whole capitalism/occupy thing was a bit heavy handed but I loved the depth and serious tone of the film. Kermode was right that it was great that a property and the audience were treated this way instead of the broad action brushstrokes that most populist films are drawn in.

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I kind of thought the problem with the film was that it was all mainly broad brushstrokes, and the smaller details seemed to have been lost in the mix.

The whole escape from jail thing still bugs me... alright, Bruce escapes and he's in some foreign land and he's got no money and the next time we see him he's in a locked-down Gotham and he's got there in a very short space of time and successfully tracked down Selina Kyle...

I know it's a 'comic book' movie and some suspension of disbelief is needed, but I really wanted to know how he managed all of that. Not in an annoying trying-to-pick-holes way, but genuinely when he got out the jail and we saw that big wide shot with the dramatic music I thought- oh, he's fucked. He's thousands of miles from home. He's got no money. He's on Bane's home turf. And he's never going to get back into Gotham. This is going to be cool seeing him work this one out...

...and then he's just stepping out onto the street in Gotham- hiya.

Oh. Alright. It just felt like a case of suspension of disbelief too far and it robbed the set-up of any real tension and made Bane and the League seem a bit thick.

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I'd agree. the film was so remorselessly bleak I welcomed that scene; a scene the audience AND Alfred wished for.

Minor niggles. The complete lack of one character did make me think when he was going to feature again as the runtime continued and the whole capitalism/occupy thing was a bit heavy handed but I loved the depth and serious tone of the film. Kermode was right that it was great that a property and the audience were treated this way instead of the broad action brushstrokes that most populist films are drawn in.

I agree. The Dark Knight Rises demanded concrete closure. Ambiguous endings work when a story arc alludes to ambiguity. Inception for instance hit on that note constantly.

Moving on and still living a meaningful life served as a core theme through out the entire DKR movie. You had Bruce putting an end to his Batman thing, as well as recovering from losing Rachel. Analogous to that you had Talia obsessing and dieing over Ra's legacy. Selina fervently hunting for a way to clear her records and start over.

I found the ending poetic as you could see Bruce actually found someone and something. He actually discovered hope and a new life after such a drearily long path in life.

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Re the issue about Bruce getting back

Does everyone really think that a billionaire would have ALL his money tied up in one company. Surely he'd have some money in offshore accounts or something. Yeah the way he suddenly got out of the prison and back into Gotham so easily and quickly wasn't done great but I'm inclined to think he would have had money elsewhere to help him get back to the States

Also Blake

Bruce Wayne is "broke" but isn't Wayne Industries still a big corporation and isn't Fox now the head of that corporation? So as long as Fox is on the board running the company. So if they still have money he can supply Blake with the tools he needs

Alfred's ending

I like to think he thought Bruce was dead hense the whole "I've failed you" and then later

(off screen) Bruce has told him he's alive and to meet up with him at his holiday destination. This is how I saw it, otherwise Alfred's reaction would have been more than a cheeky smile.

I really think some people over analyse things way too much. I have my theories on how stuff happens off screen and I go with it, I don't sit getting annoyed because it could have happened like this or like that and how come the director didn't tell use every minute detail.

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I kind of thought the problem with the film was that it was all mainly broad brushstrokes, and the smaller details seemed to have been lost in the mix.

The whole escape from jail thing still bugs me... alright, Bruce escapes and he's in some foreign land and he's got no money and the next time we see him he's in a locked-down Gotham and he's got there in a very short space of time and successfully tracked down Selina Kyle...

I know it's a 'comic book' movie and some suspension of disbelief is needed, but I really wanted to know how he managed all of that. Not in an annoying trying-to-pick-holes way, but genuinely when he got out the jail and we saw that big wide shot with the dramatic music I thought- oh, he's fucked. He's thousands of miles from home. He's got no money. He's on Bane's home turf. And he's never going to get back into Gotham. This is going to be cool seeing him work this one out...

...and then he's just stepping out onto the street in Gotham- hiya.

Oh. Alright. It just felt like a case of suspension of disbelief too far and it robbed the set-up of any real tension and made Bane and the League seem a bit thick.

I took that as a little throwback to Batman Begins. When we see the young Bruce travelling the World, sneaking onto ships and transports. He’s a fairly capable guy so I don’t think it’s too much of leap for him to put his hands on a thousand dollars to fly back to America. For all we know the prison could have been out in the Mexican desert and he just walked across the border.

Or else he just rang Fox and asked him to send a helicopter to collect him.

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Surely Bruce's escape didn't actually take place at the same time as the events we're shown in Gotham (after he breaks his TV)? He could've got out a month earlier and spent the time getting back to Gotham and Planning his return.

The confusing thing about the two-comebacks structure is that the ending of TDK promised a Dark Knight roaming Gotham, accepting the hatred of the people while he did the greater good. Skip Bruce wandering around on his cane feeling sorry for himself (keep the hermitism) and then the first chase scene with the cops would nicely bookend with that.

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I really enjoyed it. I like Batman.

There were a few minor annoyances

the clumsy exchange between the two cops at the Harvey Dent Day speech explaining in unrealistic detail the story of Gordon so far. It really was embarrassingly bad and I found it pretty jarring. Plus how bright that prison was considering the impact of Bane's "I was born in darkness" speech. People seemed pretty nice down there. Also, not a fault of the film because it wasn't about that, but I really miss the Patrick Bateman-esque Bruce Wayne. Bale plays that part brilliantly.

Loved it all otherwise.

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Does everyone really think that a billionaire would have ALL his money tied up in one company. Surely he'd have some money in offshore accounts or something. Yeah the way he suddenly got out of the prison and back into Gotham so easily and quickly wasn't done great but I'm inclined to think he would have had money elsewhere to help him get back to the States

Sure, but it's not just that. It's that the city's under lockdown. All known entrances and exits are being watched. Plus Bruce Wayne is out in a foreign land with no ID, passport, nothing and there's a bomb due to go off in Gotham the next day or so. So there's a whole series of obstacles set up for him- he's stranded, no money, ID, anything- in an area controlled by Bane- trying to reach a city where people can't enter or exit. Which is a pretty exciting set-up.

It reminds me of Michael Douglas in The Game where he ends up in Mexico, trying to sell his watch, and that's just to get across the border. I don't think it's over-analysing something too much- it's just seeing a dramatic opportunity shelved in return for "...and he's back..!"

Like I said, it wasn't a massive deal, but it just highlighted how weak the prison stuff was- Bruce is in a Bane controlled prison, yet he climbs out, wanders off and makes it all the way back to Gotham, slipping in undetected and finding Selina Kyle, without anyone at all being alerted or any dramatic tension or any problems for him.

Surely Bruce's escape didn't actually take place at the same time as the events we're shown in Gotham (after he breaks his TV)? He could've got out a month earlier and spent the time getting back to Gotham and Planning his return.

He did the first break out attempt 84 days into the seige of the city- it even showed as much on the TV in his cell- and the bomb was due to go off on day 90. He tried two more times and then left with around 48 hours or 24 hours left on the bomb, can't remember which.

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It all breaks down if you look at it too much.

Don't forget the Superman from Super Returns is supposed to be active during this period and you could argue that he would be doing something during all this. Wasn't Gotham mentioned during SR?

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It all breaks down if you look at it too much.

Don't forget the Superman from Super Returns is supposed to be active during this period and you could argue that he would be doing something during all this. Wasn't Gotham mentioned during SR?

:facepalm:

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Don't forget the Superman from Super Returns is supposed to be active during this period and you could argue that he would be doing something during all this. Wasn't Gotham mentioned during SR?

Actually the brief scene with the President confirms this is set in the same universe as Stargate SG-1. Why the lazy bastards didn't just beam the nuke into space is anyone's guess.

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I thought this was very disappointing. Other people have pointed all this out before, but for every interesting and exciting bit, there was a section of unalloyed tedium. I have to confess to not really understanding the purpose of Bane’s plot

to imprison all of Gotham’s cops underground for three months, let the proles run wild, and then to set off a nuclear bomb at the end of it.

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I thought this was very disappointing. Other people have pointed all this out before, but for every interesting and exciting bit, there was a section of unalloyed tedium. I have to confess to not really understanding the purpose of Bane’s plot

to imprison all of Gotham’s cops underground for three months, let the proles run wild, and then to set off a nuclear bomb at the end of it.

The whole point of it was purely to annoy Batmang.

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the reason I loved Batman Begins was because someone took my favourite super hero and had thought long and hard about how to make him plausible, as well as his meaning.

The Dark Knight took that love even further and crafted one of my favourite cinematic villains of all time. everything about the joker was right and he again seemed completely plausible in this darkly realistic fantasy world. I can't express just how delighted I was every time I saw the joker and Batman on screen.

The Dark Knight Rises is the most implausible of the bunch. Its fails and disappoints for me on several levels and succeeds on very few. I wish I had seen the same movie that other people enjoyed so much, I really do.

The script was a mess of BAD dialogue, BAD structure and BAD contrivances - ALL beautifully acted and filmed.

Who is the Central Character?

This is a Batman Film, so I want to see a film that is from Batman's/Bruce's point of view. Devoting more screen time to John Blake than Batman (in his final movie) is an arrogant directorial choice. And one that maddens me. I don't understand Nolan's obsession with a very ordinary actor. Its like he was written as a favour to joseph gordon levitt regardless. And then that part was expanded and expanded - to the point it feels like it was Nolan's focus point.

Poor Opposition

Bane made me feel disconnected as he always sounded so fake. He didn't feel realistic and took me out of Nolan's world. There is little character to him. He just a big angry wrestler that was created back in the 90's when WWF wrestling was popular. He is one of the shallowest of all Batman's foes and that was another weakness of this film. Catwoman was brilliantly portrayed by Hathaway - but her character's motives were very poorly conceived. Such a shame as with better writing she could have been every bit as iconic as Health had been. She was neutered by the writers - and felt more like Batgirl than Catwoman.

Infact there is a big Heath size hole in this movie. Despite his death Nolan still had plenty of characters left to choose from that have much more depth than Bane.

The city in melt down felt anything but really. Time skipped by, and the whole place didn't look like it had gone tits up at all. The streets were clean, people looked well feed - and the whole thing just felt glossed over. Nothing like as effective as when Rachel takes Bruce to look around the underbelly of Gotham and witness the injustice. Nothing to motive Batman. Nothing to motive us to care about saving them. Piss poor.

The movie feels to me like Nolan was ready to move on after the Dark Knight. His heart's not in it. There wasn't the same love and care he had used to make the previous films work - and he put his name to a very pedestrian end to the trilogy. And that is saddening. Why break the reality he had worked so hard to establish with flying cars and angry wrestlers? I am sure he had his reasons but none of them make this film any better unfortunately.

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Well, I really enjoyed it. Not as clever or deep as The Dark Knight but a great end to the trilogy.

Bane is no Joker, but he's got a great presence to him. Really physical and brutal. His voice takes some getting used to - it's just not what you expect him to sound like, which kind of adds to the fear of him. The fight scenes between him and Batman were suprisingly straightforward. No tricks, they properly go at it. The final fight between them had me on the edge of my seat as they just batter each other senseless.

I didn't see the twist coming, but I don't think it amounted to anything anyway. *shrug*

Ambiguous ending: nice.

Two things I found unintentionally amusing when watching it. Firstly, the "Bat Voice"is even more ridiculous in this one, because at one point he uses it to talk to himself! WTF?

Secondly, at the end when he's carrying the bomb, it reminded me of the 60s movie where he's running around with the cartoon "bomb", and then I expected him to see some cute little ducks and fly somewhere else. :)

In short: very good. It'll have to sink in some more over time but on first viewing I really liked it. On par with the first one, not up to the standard of the second, but certainly very 'epic' and fitting and final and stuff.

I don't really see the messiness or pacing problems people are talking about. Yeah, it's long, it takes its time to get going, but I'm fine with that. Didn't feel the need to look at my watch once.

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In an age where the Transformers Trilogy CGI Nightmare exists all I can say is thank god blockbuster films like this still get made.

This film's script really isn't that far in advance of Transformers when you break it down. It's just much better directed.

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I read a plot summary of Transformers 3 and it was all Optimus Prime "executing" (wikipedia's choice of phrase) other Transformers. Maybe they had a new line of toys to sell or something, but that sounds surprisingly grim for a Michael Bay film.

It is not reported whether he used a noose or guillotine.

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I read a plot summary of Transformers 3 and it was all Optimus Prime "executing" (wikipedia's choice of phrase) other Transformers. Maybe they had a new line of toys to sell or something, but that sounds surprisingly grim for a Michael Bay film.

It is not reported whether he used a noose or guillotine.

I watched approximately 10 minutes of Transformers 3 on Sky Movies while flicking over and in that space of time saw a children's character dismembering enemies in a fashion that would make Jason Vorhees wince.

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So I saw this on Friday and have had a hard time forming a firm opinion of it. I didn't enjoy it as much as Begins or Dark Knight, but that is not to say it is not a good film. I think my overriding opinion would be disappointment really. Regardless of whether it is a good film or not, it's not the film I was hoping for and I don't think it is a successful conclusion to the Nolan trilogy. I just wish the whole film had gone in a different direction as the direction they chose didn't really work for me. Specific spoilers follow:

Dislikes:

The Bat. Too CGI and a move away from the raw power and plausibility of the Tumbler. The end with Batman outrunning the missiles could have been taken wholesale from a James Bond film. I also didn't like that we didn't really get to see Batman using the Tumbler at all and instead everything was relegated to the new toy.

Robin. Didn't buy that he had just worked out Bruce was Batman just by gazing longingly into his eyes. Don't know why the film focussed so much on him and don't know why they set him up to take on a further films in the franchise. Nolan had always avoided Robin and I wish he had left him out of this one.

Alfred: Simply put not in the movie enough but the scenes he was in were the high point. I would have loved to see what he was up to during the city crisis.

Batman and his EMP. It looked rediculous, Batman is a hard mother******* and here he is holding a plastic gun to try and take someone down. Please.

Gordon: Was immobilised for half the film and didn't do too much when he was in action.

Bruce becoming a recluse? Why? OK, he gave up being Batman but why become a recluse for seven years? Even stranger is that at least for part of this time he was active in the world as he was developing his new power technology.

Bane having his underground lair beneath where Fox keeps all the toys. Err, isn't that also beneath Wayne Tower? You'd think to the extent that Fox protects those assets he might have made it slightly more challenging to break in than just planting a bomb in the sewers beneath it. And how does Bane know precisely where they are stored?

The plot in general. It didn't hang together very well at all. As others have mentioned, we have two plots of Bruce being out of action and needing to get back into action which is one too many. The cops have been stuck underground for three months with limited food, medical supplies and exercise and effectively living in their own filth but they emerge unscathed and completely fine. Of course they then proceed to walk, apparently, unarmed into a mob of criminals armed with automatic weapons. Thankfully none of the criminals can aim a gun which avoided them simply being gunned down when they made their approve. And where did all their weapons go to, they must have been armed when they went into the tunnel. And why send 3000 cops into a tunnel to look for a bad guy, isn't this what SWAT is for? Also, I don't understand Bane's plot. He is going to destroy Gotham but he'll wait for five months to do so? What's the point. Plus I think we needed to see more of what was happening in Gotham during those months. It doesn't come across as all that bad with the criminals out roaming the streets (presumably murdering and raping people?) and no one seems that worse for wear.

The ending. So Batman flies a Nuclear Bomb out of the city and it explodes. Still seems like that would be pretty fucking bad in terms of radiation spread. Oh, and apparently the autopilot which Fox himself couldn't fix was simply patched by Wayne at some point. And really, you don't need Batman to fly a bomb away, they could have simply neutralised the trigger as they did anyway and they ask the military to send a chopper to scoop it up. I did like the fact that Wayne got a happy ending although Alfred takes it in his stride that the person he has cared for his entire life and was blown up by a bomb is now alive and well.

The Good:

The first proper Batman vs. Bane ruckus. Fantastic. Really enjoyed it and it was suitably brutal. Only complaint would be that they sort of signposted that Batman would lose.

The Batman comeback was also good fun, even if it was slightly implausible how it happened. Frankly, any time we actually have Batman on screen was good fun.

The final third of the movie was also good, everything ramped up to it and when the shit hit the fan I did enjoy it.

Cat women was well portrayed and well acted.

Bane: Not quite as sadistic or unhinged as I thought he would be but not a terrible adversary since he is the first proper villain we have seen capable of knocking the shit out of Batman. The voice didn't really work though and made him seem far less threatening than he could have been.

The tension. Credit where credit is due, the film really notched up the tension and you really did wonder how they hell they were going to write themselves out of a Batman with a broken back, Bane on the loose and letting all the criminals free to play with Batman's toys of destruction, all the bridges collapsed, the police presumably dead and buried and, oh wait, a nuclear bomb roaming the city ready to be detonated at any time. They didn't always write themselves out of these situations too well, but they certainly stacked all the odds against the hero of the story.

It looks as if I hated it far more than I did. I still think on the whole it was a good film, but there was a lot of disappointments in it and ultimately it did not meet either my expectations or match the quality of the previous two films in the series. It will be one to see again to see if on second viewing it gets better but I am not sure it will. I suspect on second viewing the flaws may be even more pronounced.

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The weakest of the trilogy for sure, but i still enjoyed the hell out of this. It fails as a stand alone film, but as an ending to everything that has come before it really caps everything off nicely for me.

Bane is very much the immovable object, he's confident in his plan and he pretty much just writes off Batman as more of an annoyance rather than anything else. He felt present throughout in a very threatening way.

The Bat is a pretty poor gadget, especially when the Pod is still in use. That thing is incredible and I love how it just tumbles about on sharp corners and turns.

About the ending...

the ending wasn't ambiguous enough and the shot of Bruce & Seline felt like the only cop out. A simple cut at the moment Alfred looks up and smiles would've had a lot more impact similar to the that at the end of Inception.

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Oh come now. Seriously?

Why_so_serious__by_Tyrite.jpg

I'm being facetious. But I do think the problem with this film is how summer blockbuster like it is - in a way the previous Nolan films weren't. that's what disappoints me.

I loved that TDK was so unlike a studio blockbuster. it was true to its subject yet dark as fuck.

the macguffin in TDKR is no better than that the "Allspark" from Transpormers - or the "Tesseract" from the "Avengers" "Thor" etc etc. The poor realisation of certain characters, massive plot holes and flying cars feel like there wasn't time to properly make this stuff work - in order to hit the release date.

Of course its better filmed, acted and directed than Transformers 4 - but the script its based upon (despite its pretentions) is just an average summer blockbuster dressed in Nolan's trademark style.

I honestly wish I had enjoyed it as much as some of you. Atleast I will always have TDK.

:(

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