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MK-1601

Smoke and mirrors

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I love games that try to fake effects that are beyond the capabilities of the hardware.

Ranger-X's use of parallax scrolling to make 'polygonal' tunnels, and palette-shifting light and shadow.

Castlevania Bloodlines' reflecting water, collapsing scenery and rotating Nebulus-style towers.

Mickey Mania's, well, everything, from 3D cranes to the out-of-the-screen moose chase. (And another Nebulus tower)

's enormous articulated bosses (the scanline-effect butterfly wings being a good one), Dynamite Headdy's '3D' platforms on skewers, Gunstar Heroes' title screen and the Seven Force.

Adventures of Batman & Robin's parallax-heavy opening level.

Red Zone's spinny-rotatey 3D landscape.

The Cave Salamander level of Earthworm Jim 2.

Anyone got any more? With vids/pics preferably :huh:

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Yeah i remember Mickey Mania being ahead of its time, especially on the MD as it didn't have stuff like mode7 or the sprite scaling/rotation capabilities of the snes. Gunster Heroes does a lot of stuff not thought possible on the "humble" md, the

A lot of early 8bits used techniques to double the maximum sprites allowed on any point on the screen via alternating between the two.

Donkey Kong Country faked a 3d appearance (long before 2.5d was the vogue) by using sprites created on specialist 3d hardware to overcome hardware limits. It still looks amazing due to the sprites being pre-rendered, but they are just sprites. A healthy cart size helped

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Donkey Kong Country faked a 3d appearance (long before 2.5d was the vogue) by using sprites created on specialist 3d hardware to overcome hardware limits. It still looks amazing due to the sprites being pre-rendered, but they are just sprites. A healthy cart size helped

It really doesn't look amazing anymore, it's a game that has aged very badly both from a visual and gameplay perspective. Try playing it on a Wii in component mode, it's a mess. Maybe it looks better in SD...

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DKC was a heap of shit even at the time, it seems weird to see young pups who think it was any good. Yoshi's Island was the real technical showcase.

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DKC was a heap of shit even at the time, it seems weird to see young pups who think it was any good. Yoshi's Island was the real technical showcase.

This (is totally wrong) and I'm 30 so can't be called a young pup. I also played these through on Xbox a couple of years back and they still look great.

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To this day, I still don't think I've seen as much parallax scrolling as in

Look at all those clouds moving at different speeds! Plus some nice water effects at the bottom of the screen, too.

Shame the central sprite was a bit naff.

Plus the spaceship that flew out of the screen at 1:25 on this video of the

knocked my socks off. The crazy ray-traced graphics in general blew me away.

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Yoshi's Island is far better, yes. But DKC is far from crap, even though it is rather simple. The sequel is a lot better though.

Graphically is was awesome at the time and still pretty good today, the snow levels in particular.

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Shadow of the Collosus pushed the PS2 to its limits, the frame rate was all over the place at times. Cant wait to see what they can achieve on the PS3, although they are taking their time.

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The AI in Half Life. Most of it was scripted but clever use of sound and some very good scripting made it look like your enemies were a lot smarter than they were. There is as far as I know no squad AI in Half Life but sometimes I could swear that they worked together to try and kill me. One of the best "tricks" in a game I ever experienced.

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I was thinking on this subject: if there isn't already, we need a word of phrase in the gaming world, to describe in shorthand the way in one which something that looks amazing now won't do so in a few year's time.

'Retro goggles' doesn't quite cut it. I'm not sure what else could.

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DKC was a heap of shit even at the time, it seems weird to see young pups who think it was any good. Yoshi's Island was the real technical showcase.

I'm with angel on this.

Using rendered graphics was a bloody brilliant *idea*, but wasn't especially difficult (actually, one of the main difficulties would be getting usable 3D models, renders and animation from your largely 2D trained staff). The main technical problem was handling the massive amounts of data needed, and they side-stepped doing anything clever by having a massive cart (an economic solution to what would otherwise be a technical problem).

Yoshi's Island was really impressive in every respect.

Still, DKC is a brilliant contender for this thread, as it fooled a lot of people into thinking the SNES was doing more than it really was at the time.

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It looked the part back in the day.

.::: Likewise Kirby's Adventure's parallax heaven during some of the final boss stages and ending sequence.

Very impressive back then, especially on a NES.

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It really doesn't look amazing anymore, it's a game that has aged very badly both from a visual and gameplay perspective. Try playing it on a Wii in component mode, it's a mess. Maybe it looks better in SD...

There's your problem. Try playing it on a modded xbox over component in 1080i, it looks fucking amazing. Modded xbox >>>>> VC

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To this day, I still don't think I've seen as much parallax scrolling as in
Look at all those clouds moving at different speeds! Plus some nice water effects at the bottom of the screen, too.

Shame the central sprite was a bit naff.

Lionheart was immense!....try running it on a modded xbox on UAEX, stretched to full screen (it was a small window on the amiga)...its utterly superb and still fun. I bought Lionheart at the time due to the AP review and loved it...despite the mincing character ^_^

I'm with angel on this.

Using rendered graphics was a bloody brilliant *idea*, but wasn't especially difficult (actually, one of the main difficulties would be getting usable 3D models, renders and animation from your largely 2D trained staff). The main technical problem was handling the massive amounts of data needed, and they side-stepped doing anything clever by having a massive cart (an economic solution to what would otherwise be a technical problem).

Yoshi's Island was really impressive in every respect.

Still, DKC is a brilliant contender for this thread, as it fooled a lot of people into thinking the SNES was doing more than it really was at the time.

exactly, it was a pure brute force solution, chuck a load of cart memory at a big name game and hype the hell out of it. the poor third parties paying twice the price for cart space couldnt compete fairly at all. also it had no character, it was soulless to me...

remember the reviews at the time on the official mags...100%! forget the playstation...erm no. Only the great super play actually said it was very ordinary game-wise

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I always found the entrance to the Tiny-Huge World in Mario 64 very impressive. Stand in the centre & look down the corridors to the pictures & they look the same, but when you approach them it appears that Mario is getting bigger or smaller, but is actually an illusion of how the corridor is angled.

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The Legend of Zelda- Ocarina of Time

Not because of any amazing in game effects or anything, but the game is 32Mb. 32Mb!!

You get a texture map for one part of a characters ear these days and it would be more than 32Mb

They managed to pack all of Hyrule & Link's epic adventure into 32Mb, it hurts my head.

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I knew someone was going to post a 32/48/64 Kb example from the 8 bits days.

The thing with OOT is it's a fully textured 3d game, with lots of dungeons, locations, characters etc.

I dunno I think it's amazing.

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Yes, it's a fantastically beautiful game.

God, I really want to play it again. I wouldn't buy a PS2 just for SOTC and Ico, would I?

Maybe I would.

I went out of my way to get hold of a 80Gb PS3 with the backwards compatibility just so I could re-play Ico and SOTC (well amongst other things but mainly those two)

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I went out of my way to get hold of a 80Gb PS3 with the backwards compatibility just so I could re-play Ico and SOTC (well amongst other things but mainly those two)

They are such wonderful games.

As long as Team Ico's next game is incredible, which one suspects it will be, that will be the day I buy a PS3.

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It wasn't beyond the PS1, but I've always smiled at the bits of 3D in Castlevania: SotN. Particularly the roof with its completely screwed up perspective. I don't know whether it was intentional.

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I'm with angel on this.

Using rendered graphics was a bloody brilliant *idea*, but wasn't especially difficult (actually, one of the main difficulties would be getting usable 3D models, renders and animation from your largely 2D trained staff). The main technical problem was handling the massive amounts of data needed, and they side-stepped doing anything clever by having a massive cart (an economic solution to what would otherwise be a technical problem).

Yoshi's Island was really impressive in every respect.

Still, DKC is a brilliant contender for this thread, as it fooled a lot of people into thinking the SNES was doing more than it really was at the time.

I was under the impression that DKC did do some fancy stuff by putting the SNES into a 32 bit colour mode or somesuch?

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