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lewismistreated

The Story of Braid

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Guest jagged

I've been doing some thinking on this. I think that both the thread starter and the author of the gamefaqs plot analysis have developed deeply thought out analysises of this work, but I believe there is more to this story.

Braid is a game presented without a linear story, but one still exists. The worlds are ordered by numbers and have a clear sequence to them, even though that sequence isn't followed. There's a clear beginning, when Tim is standing outside of the princesses bedroom and the chase begins. However, there is no clear ending. The "rescue" never ends, it switches to the chase when the player reaches the end of the line. Many have proposed that this realization of tim being a bad guy is the ending. Me, I'm more of a concrete guy, the metaphorical ending left me with a bit of a sour taste in my mouth (no matter how awesomely ingenious it was, thank you Mr. Blow), which led me to search for more.

Considering this game from a linear storyline, the princess escapes tim's clutches by being saved, Tim goes on his search for the princess, and at the end goes back to save her from the knight. Seeing it from the way its presented, Tim starts off outside of the epilogue door already having lost the princess, goes on a search for her, then.... losing her again? And then it loops back around over and over? It makes sense If you read the world 1's text about Tim living a contrariwise life, but still doesn't live up to the description perfectly. Many believe that the world 2-6 texts do not account for the actual story, but are just there to set up a background for the world. But what if you take a closer look at the text with the storyline in mind I have proposed?

World 2:

"Our world, with its rules of causality, has trained us to be miserly

with forgiveness. By forgiving too readily, we can be badly hurt.

But if we've learned from a mistake and become better for it,

shouldn't we be rewarded for the learning, rather than punished for

the mistake?

What if our world worked differently? Suppose we could tell her: 'I didn't

mean what I just said,' and she would say: 'It's okay, I understand,' and she

would not turn away, and life would really proceed as though we had never said

that thing? We could remove the damage but still be wiser for the experience."

Explanation: After Tim lost the princess to the knight because of the mistake, Tim set out to learn from this experience.

World 3:

"Off in the distance, Tim saw a castle where the flags flutter even when the

wind has expired, and the bread in the kitchen is always warm. A little bit of

magic."

Explanation: He's setting out to look for the princess. Instead of seeing a land that's destroyed and battered, he sees a land that's doing pretty good. If he was looking for the princess, who we believe is a bomb, wouldn't he head in the direction of a place that looks pretty bad and progress along to worse and worse lands?

World 4:

"Visiting his home for a holiday meal, Tim felt as though he had regressed to

those long-ago years when he lived under their roof, oppressed by their

insistence on upholding strange values which, to him, were meaningless. Back

then, bickering would erupt over drops of gravy spilt onto the tablecloth."

"Escaping, Tim walked in the cool air toward the university he'd attended after

moving out of his parent's home. As he distanced himself from that troubling

house, he felt the embarrassment of childhood fading into the past. But now he

stepped into all the insecurities he'd felt at the university, all the panic of

walking a social tightrope."

"Tim only felt relieved after the whole visit was over, sitting back home in

the present, steeped in contrast he saw how he'd improved so much from those

old days. This improvement, day by day, takes him ever-closer to finding the

Princess. If she exists - she must! - she will transform him, and everyone."

"He felt on his trip that every place stirs up an emotion, and every emotion

invokes a memory: a time and location. So couldn't he find the Princess now,

tonight, just by wandering from place to place and noticing how he feels? A

trail of feelings, of awe and inspiration, should lead him to that castle in

the future her arms enclosing him, her scent fills him with excitement, creates

a moment so strong he can remember it in the past."

"Immediately Tim walked out his door, the next morning, toward whatever the new

day held. He felt something like optimism."

Explanation: Tim started out with a bad past, but the toughness of it has taught him, and now he is a more experienced man because of it. His present is pretty good and the outcast for his future looks even better. Also to note, Tim went to a university, so it is inferable he is well educated, and he searches for the princess through feelings, awe, and inspiration.

Chapter 5:

Nothing

Explanation: I've had a hard time working this into my thesis, and I have still come up with nothing. If anybody can help me improve this, it would be appreciated.

Chapter 6:

"Perhaps in a perfect world, the ring would be a symbol of happiness. It's a

sign of ceaselessness devotion: even if he will never find the Princess, he

will always be trying. He still will wear the ring."

"But the thing makes its presence known. It shines out to others like a beacon

of warning. It makes people slow to approach. Suspicion, distrust. Interactions

are torpedoed before Tim can open his mouth."

"In time he learns to deal with the others carefully. He matches their hesitant

pace, tracing a soft path through their defenses. But this exhausts him, and it

only works to a limited degree. It doesn't get him what he needs."

"Tim begins to hide the ring in his pocket. But he can hardly bear it - too

long tucked away, that part of him might suffocate."

Explanation: People recognize him by the ring and know what he has done (the creation of the bomb)

Chapter 1: Keep in mind that the Tim described here is from the very beginning of the game in this linear storyline.

"Tim is here too, but he is scrutinizing the gloss on the lips on the screen,

measuring the angle of the plume of a distant helicopter crash. He thinks he

discerns a message, when the cinema closes and most of the audience strolls

down the plaza to the south, Tim goes north."

Explanation: Tim is shown to be a very mathematical and detail oriented man, very unlike the Tim described to us in the other worlds. Also, it shows that Tim thinks differently than the masses.

Epilogue: Also from the very beginning of the storyline.

"He worked his ruler and his compass. He inferred. He deduced. He scrutinized

the fall of an apple, the twisting of metal orbs hanging from a thread. He was

searching for the Princess, and he would not stop until he found her, for he

was hungry. He cut rats into pieces to examine their brains, implanted tungsten

posts into the skulls of water-starved monkeys."

"He scrutinized the fall of an apple, the twisting of metal orbs hanging from a

thread. Through these clues he would find the Princess, see her face. After an

especially fervent night of tinkering, he kneeled behind a bunker in the

desert; he held a piece of welder's glass up to his eyes and waited."

"On that moment hung eternity. Time stood still. Space contracted to a

pinpoint. It was as though the earth had opened and the skies split. One felt

as though he had been privileged to witness the Birth of the World..."

"Someone near him said: 'It worked.'"

"Someone else said: 'Now we are all sons of bitches.'"

"The candy store. Everything he wanted was on the opposite side of that pane of

glass. The store was decorated in bright colors, and the scents wafting out

drove him crazy. He tried to rush for the door, or just get closer to the

glass, but he couldn't. She held him back with great strength. Why would she

hold him back? How might he break free of her grasp? He considered violence."

"He cannot say he has understood all of this. Possibly he's more confused now

than ever. But all these moments he's contemplated - something has occurred.

The moments feel substantial in his mind, like stones. Kneeling, reaching down

toward the closest one, running his hand across it, he finds it smooth, and

slightly cold."

"He tests the stone's weight; he finds he can lift in, and the others too. He

can fit them together to create a foundation, an embankment, a castle."

"To build a castle of appropriate size, he will need a great many stones. But

what he's got now, feels like an acceptable start..."

Again, showing Tim as a mathematical man, and also adds the layer of him stopping at nothing to achieve his goals. "One felt as though he had been privileged to witness the Birth of the World..." is either saying that anyone who observed this felt this or only one of them (possibly Tim) felt this, while the rest didn't. Tim wants to get to the atomic power of the bomb blast, the "candy store".He considers violence one of the methods to obtain the candy store, fitting in with his stopping at nothing to achieve goals attribute. Also he wants to build a castle, which we can infer from previous texts he wants to live in with the princess.

Additional notes: These texts are told from a 3rd person view, that is to say, a 3rd person bystander who doesn't share the reverse time line that Tim supposedly interprets the world in. Judging by that, everything in these texts should be taken at face value. The dialogue of the knight before and after the journey are decidedly different. This was easily explained by the warped view Tim had, where he saw himself rescuing her but in actuality he was stalking her, but in this linear time line there is importance in the distinction of the two sets of dialogue. Also the block for 1-1 in the castle is turned upside down, maybe this symbolizes what I’m saying?

After all that in-depth analysis of the chapters in this linear storyline I've proposed, I'm left with a few questions.

Why does Tim head for beautiful places when looking for the princess if shes a bomb, a device designed to make places worse?

Why does Tim's life seem to be steadily improving, instead of heading in a downward spiral towards the creation of a bomb?

Why are people hesitant of this ring that Tim wears, if no one would now about the princess/bomb before it's inception?

And most importantly, why would Tim want to live in a castle with a bomb, something that could kill him?

Braid is not a story of an atomic bomb and obsession. Braid is a story about nuclear power and redemption.

Tim is a scientist, a cold and calculating one, but one who can see the world in a different light than the masses. He is researching nuclear power and it's applications, but he can never seem to reach it. "He considered violence" as a means of reaching this raw power, of understanding it better, which accounts for all his actions with the girls in his life; he was too impatient to wait for what he wanted that he acted violently to get him closer to it. Unfortunately, this was the mistake that he made with the princess. In order to better understand her, he created the atomic bomb to realize her power. He never had any intention to wield it, he was after all a scientist, the role of which is to observe and test, also when the bomb went off at the testing all he wanted to do was get near it’s power, he didn’t care for the bomb himself. However, the creation of the atomic bomb splits Tim and the princess apart, driving the princess (as the real world application of the bomb) into the knights arms, who symbolizes the powers that want to use the nuclear power in a bomb form (military, president, etc.). Tim realizes the mistake he’s made and sets out on a journey to get the princess back by collecting the stones in his mind (The stones that build the castle, which are the levels, which symbolizes research into using nuclear power for good.) He sets out in the direction of a beautiful land, symbolizing he’s looking for a future that is good as a result of harnessing the princess’s powers, and he searches for her using feelings of awe and inspiration, indicating he’s moved on from his cold, mathematical way. People approach him with hesitance because he is seeking nuclear power, and all they know about it is its destructive side, they can’t imagine it being put to use for good. Tim eventually catches up to the knight, who wants to keep the princess as a weapon, and rescues her. What would have happened had time not reverted back would be that the princess would live in the castle as the positive application of nuclear science, nuclear power, and the castle would be a nuclear power plant.

A little far-fetched, but it can still be backed by the evidence. I realize that this thesis may have many holes in it, such as no explanations for the other girls in tim’s life. If you can find anyway to improve upon it, mesh it in with other theories, or rebut it, feel free to do so.

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Hello there! After reading everyone's posts and theories here, I had to add my own. I feel like this is one of the few places where people are genuinely, civilly discussing the story and implications of the game (even those who don't like the story!) and I thought I'd come share my own ideas about the storyline-- I think I have a take on it I haven't seen explicitly stated elsewhere, and I'm curious to know what other people think about it:

Why "Braid"?

Though we're told early on that the Princess has a braid and is therefore connected to the title intimately, when we finally see her, her hair is free. There's a woman caretaker (mother? nanny? babysitter?) who's described as having a braid in her hair at the end. But it seems like a strange title to give a game where everything has deeper meaning. Braids are (traditionally) three strands of hair/rope/whatever interwoven with one another, no one piece given more than momentary significance over the other, and since finishing Braid, I've been searching for what three stories or elements are interwoven here. Something someone said in a post on GameFAQS(sorry for the lack of credit, I've read so many!) about getting the secret "stars" in the game, and their significance got me to thinking, and I finally have an idea about what these three story elements are.

- Tim-- The "Actual" Story

Tim's story, whatever the truth of it behind his own perception, is the immediately apparent arc in the game. His literal and figurative search for the Princess-- a woman, presumably flesh and blood, whether she be his girlfriend from a happier time, the ideal woman he can never have, whether she has similar powers or not, whether he's had her love at some point in the past or not-- composes the part of the game that's relatively easy to see. The particulars are as open to interpretation as anything else in the game, but it's hard to deny that there's some physicality in this plot "strand"-- a man, journeying through a landscape, to achieve a goal. This is the story through Tim's eyes, whatever those eyes may be seeing.

- The Atomic Bomb-- Humanity are all sons of b***hes.

This is the underpinning story, the metaphorical text that underlies Tim's search for a girl. Once you know to look for this, much of the story can be seen as Tim's regret and potential insanity as a result of looking for, and finding, his Princess-- the secret of the atom and the personified mystery of nature within. I certainly think that it's possible, and supportable, to view this as the "real" story and the search for the woman as the metaphor, but I personally feel that, given that the atomic bomb reveal is only at the very end, even after the truth about who really is saving the Princess, the atomic bomb is the metaphor.

If we do view Tim's search for a physical Princess (or the losing thereof) as the literal view and the atomic bomb as the metaphor, then this strand becomes less about Tim and more about humanity. The Princess is a little like Mother Nature, a force within that we struggle to comprehend, control, and catch-- but who's really right there, whispering to us all along, if only we could hear her. She's the dream of peace that so often leads to more conflict because we all want what we can't have, lined up, sometimes literally, behind the glass, as the "physical" Princess was in the first "strand".

These two were relatively easy for me to pick out, once I had finished, though my original thoughts on the matter were nowhere near as clear and extensive as the rest of this thread, but I really felt as though there had to be a third strand, another piece of the puzzle. I tried to pick apart the castle at the end, I tried to pick apart the story itself and find hints of another line of thinking (the closest I came was a Mother strand that isn't really complete the way the other two are), I scanned forums for what happens after the last star has been found and the Princess "caught" (I'm not very good at these sorts of games typically and couldn't imagine trying to do HARDER timing puzzles) But, as I said earlier, it wasn't until someone else commented on how pointless collecting the stars were that it all became clear to me. The third strand is--

- You-- Breaking the Fourth Wall

The stars are completely "pointless" in the terms we normally define games in. There aren't any achievements to unlock, there's not any new story to unfold-- the Princess explodes and vanishes, which, while awesome, doesn't add anything definitive to either the physical Princess or the atomic bomb Princess storyline-- we already know Tim doesn't catch his Princess and is left empty handed, we already know the atomic Princess explodes. Two of the stars are particularly loathsomely difficult to get-- one of them requiring a long span of letting the game just sit and run, and one of them only accessible early in the game and then never again, requiring a restart to achieve if missed (as it almost certainly will be). Of the remaining stars, most are extremely difficult to get, requiring their own brand of time, energy, patience and dedication... or should that be obsession.

Blow has said that nothing in the game is without it's point, but the stars certainly appear to be. But in a game where all other plot elements revolve around obsession with achieving some extremely difficult goal, I think it's telling that there's a difficult, hidden goal with no reason to achieve that requires not just an obsession with the game to even FIND, but also involves literal, out of game *time* in it's solution. The game is literally about Time before it's about any other thing, and the reversal and both permanence and impermanence of it as well. Why not have a puzzle that takes an obscene amount of time to complete? Why not have a puzzle that requires that you, essentially, *reverse* time (starting over from a new game) to reasonably solve? And if you've already gotten all the other difficult stars first, what a momentous undertaking to finish not only the normal game a second time, but also get all those stars again! You'd *really* have to want to see the end to do that, wouldn't you? You'd have to *really* want to unlock all the secrets of the relationship, of the world, of the game to spend that much time on it.

And what's your reward at the end for your effort?

Why, the Princess, of course, a princess you could see much more easily if you'd simply gone outside and looked up at the night sky. A Princess that is no more than a shadow of the real thing, watching over you all along.

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Guest complicatedshoes
- You-- Breaking the Fourth Wall

The stars are completely "pointless" in the terms we normally define games in. There aren't any achievements to unlock, there's not any new story to unfold-- the Princess explodes and vanishes, which, while awesome, doesn't add anything definitive to either the physical Princess or the atomic bomb Princess storyline-- we already know Tim doesn't catch his Princess and is left empty handed, we already know the atomic Princess explodes. Two of the stars are particularly loathsomely difficult to get-- one of them requiring a long span of letting the game just sit and run, and one of them only accessible early in the game and then never again, requiring a restart to achieve if missed (as it almost certainly will be). Of the remaining stars, most are extremely difficult to get, requiring their own brand of time, energy, patience and dedication... or should that be obsession.

Blow has said that nothing in the game is without it's point, but the stars certainly appear to be. But in a game where all other plot elements revolve around obsession with achieving some extremely difficult goal, I think it's telling that there's a difficult, hidden goal with no reason to achieve that requires not just an obsession with the game to even FIND, but also involves literal, out of game *time* in it's solution. The game is literally about Time before it's about any other thing, and the reversal and both permanence and impermanence of it as well. Why not have a puzzle that takes an obscene amount of time to complete? Why not have a puzzle that requires that you, essentially, *reverse* time (starting over from a new game) to reasonably solve? And if you've already gotten all the other difficult stars first, what a momentous undertaking to finish not only the normal game a second time, but also get all those stars again! You'd *really* have to want to see the end to do that, wouldn't you? You'd have to *really* want to unlock all the secrets of the relationship, of the world, of the game to spend that much time on it.

And what's your reward at the end for your effort?

Why, the Princess, of course, a princess you could see much more easily if you'd simply gone outside and looked up at the night sky. A Princess that is no more than a shadow of the real thing, watching over you all along.

I had to register just to say what a brilliant post that was. Every little theory adds an extra layer of enjoyment to replays of this game and that last part of your post was the greatest thing I've read on any forum about this game. Perfect.

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Guest jagged

Nice post fromherashes, but I still think there's some validity to my theory. Yours does nicely tie up all the others and adds some depth though, nice job.

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the plot analysis faq on gamefaqs has quite a few books ive never read in-game, and i did get all of the red books

this for example:

But to be sure, Tim did encounter several warnings. Red flags, you could say.

None of which he took heed. "Listen to me," pleaded one. "Stop," begged

another. "Stop instantly." "You are running into danger!" warned the third. The

final cried out, "No!"

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I don't think it's all about science and the atom bomb, though 8 star end and epilogue bits are. A lot of it concerns the breakdown of a relationship

I think the idea is you're meant to read it as a relationship in breakup but the subtext, which isn't really subtext as it reveals itself fully by the end (I'm sure there's a word for that), is that of Oppenheimer's conflicted relationship with his creation the Atomic bomb. It's by no means the first time Oppenheimer's life has been used for dramatic purposes. If you reread the text before the reveal it makes sense in this context as well, which is handy as it offers his writing some excuse for being quite clumsy and stilted. That's not meant to sound negative, I enjoyed Braid very much. Whilst the story was secondary to the game it was short, entirely optional and clearly written around the game. I liked that it mirrored the game, a puzzle game masquerading as a platformer whilst the story was superficially a romance which told something a little deeper. Were I a betting man I'd suggest that Blow had read this, a book released 18 months ago that deals with many of the same issues as Braid.

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Were I a betting man I'd suggest that Blow had read this, a book released 18 months ago that deals with many of the same issues as Braid.

That or American Prometheus, which is the huge Oppenheimer book that came out a while ago and won the Pullitzer. You can see the echoes of Oppenheimer's relationship to the bomb (particularly the level when you'e trying to reach the princess and then you you suddenly seem to become opponents), but as always it's hard to tell if you're just imposing you're own interpretation on these things.

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Well, this whole thing went a lot better than I'd hoped. It's fantastic to see people registering on the forum especially to add their own interpretations and insights into what can quite easily be described as one of the most openly-interpretative stories found within a game of recent years. Now if only we could crack the hidden narrative secrets of Galaga Legions...

The two very detailed posts above deserve a lot more attention than I can offer them now, but there's a couple of things I found interesting.

"Off in the distance, Tim saw a castle where the flags flutter even when the

wind has expired, and the bread in the kitchen is always warm. A little bit of

magic."

Explanation: He's setting out to look for the princess. Instead of seeing a land that's destroyed and battered, he sees a land that's doing pretty good. If he was looking for the princess, who we believe is a bomb, wouldn't he head in the direction of a place that looks pretty bad and progress along to worse and worse lands?

I think you're running the danger of being incredibly literal when looking at that excerpt, especially in the context of looking at it as though it's not even supporting evidence of a single theory, but actually refuting evidence of the same subject. The problem contained at the heart of every single word of commentary offered up for Braid so far is that, really, only one or two people could come out and say "Yep, you've nailed it", and we have every reason to believe (through statements made by the creators themselves) that that's never going to happen. It'd be a disservice to the audience to do so, but at the same time, it leaves open these spaces in which we find ourselves, and in which this thread was even given room to be created in the first place.

If we were to take that even further, I think it's not too much of a leap to assume that Blow and company knew *exactly* what they were creating, not just literally but also in what response they could expect from active online gaming forums by leaving such spaces open. And if they knew what to expect, then hell, why not give it those extra few layers of almost labyrinthian content to really stir up discussion? That manifests itself in nearly every theory at the point where we say something along the lines of,

Explanation: I've had a hard time working this into my thesis, and I have still come up with nothing. If anybody can help me improve this, it would be appreciated.

I don't think these instances of theories seemingly stalling or stuttering in the face of difficult passages says as much about the theories themselves in as much as it does about what sort of interpretations Blow was expecting, and went on to knowingly make life more difficult for. It's not the most satisfying trick in the book when it comes to sitting down and working through all these passages, especially if you just want to find more damn puzzle pieces and stars, but in regards to poking the Internet hive with the proverbial stick, it couldn't have been planned better.

I'll agree in saying that fromherashes last point about 'Breaking the Fourth Wall' being worth registering for though. It's as that point, where you're seeking stars with no real knowledge of what rewards they'll offer to you playing the game, where all this stuff sort of melds together, a strange little mixture of reasonably conventional game design with some very unconvential ideas behind it. Really good stuff.

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the plot analysis faq on gamefaqs has quite a few books ive never read in-game, and i did get all of the red books

this for example:

But to be sure, Tim did encounter several warnings. Red flags, you could say.

None of which he took heed. "Listen to me," pleaded one. "Stop," begged

another. "Stop instantly." "You are running into danger!" warned the third. The

final cried out, "No!"

Nice. That links directly to this that Lewis had in the first post.

World 2: N

World 3: U

World 4: L

World 5: X

World 6: K

N: No

U: You are (standing into/approaching) danger

L: Stop instantly

X: Stop carrying out your intentions

K: You should stop, I have something important to communicate

The warnings directed towards a man intent on bringing an indescribable power into being.

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Guest Camisuke
The game mentions that he scrutinized the fall of an apple and the twisting of the metal orbs hanging from a thread. Is this not exactly how the player has to look at the game world in order to solve the puzzles?

The fall of the apple is referring to the discovery of Newtonian physics. The metal orbs from thread is referring to the experiment by Henry Cavendish (the Cavendish balance) in 1798 which finally solved for the gravitational constant that Newton knew existed, but never calculated. They needed this constant to help solve for the motion of celestial bodies (planets). Obviously, references to the advancements in physics exist in Braid. These two references are in my opinion as clear as day.

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Guest Camisuke

Two thoughts on Braid I haven't seen anything on yet.

1. In the bottom right of the house there is a bathroom with some cubes with letters on them. Very strange place for letter cubes. The letters appear to be WASD Z with the Z being separate and of a slightly different colour. Surely it's nothing, but the Z struck a memory of the book Z for Zachariah, a story about a woman who survives a nuclear holocaust and believes herself to be perhaps the last human alive until she meets the antagonist in the book, a male, who may be the last man on earth. He tries to rape and imprison her. The woman always thought that since Adam was the first man in the bible, that the last man would be Zacariah.

The reference is tenuous, but perhaps Tim in Braid is the last man on earth after a nuclear holocaust, and is reaching back in time in his mind to recreate memories (which you assist him), each memory helping him build his proverbial castle, a new foundation in the aftermath.

2. Another approach is similar to the movie Jacob's Ladder, which puts the protagonist near death and the movie consists of his attempt in his mind to reckon with his life, create a fictitious future to convince himself he's not dead, and grasp to uncover the cause of his death. Such a scenario would have Tim coping with his death, trying to piece together what his life was and reliving many of his mistakes, victories, all of those memories which makes one human. I doubt this is the premise for the game, but I put these ideas out as they might bounce off someone and make a spark.

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the plot analysis faq on gamefaqs has quite a few books ive never read in-game, and i did get all of the red books

this for example:

But to be sure, Tim did encounter several warnings. Red flags, you could say.

None of which he took heed. "Listen to me," pleaded one. "Stop," begged

another. "Stop instantly." "You are running into danger!" warned the third. The

final cried out, "No!"

I'm pretty sure that's not in the game - that long chunk of text is the GameFAQs guy trying to string together all the books into one contiguous story, and to do that he's added a lot of paragraphs of his own, and inserted details and names into the game's text.

-

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Guest Sir Anonymous

I'm sorry if this has already been brought up, but maybe there is something to be seen reading the books in reverse order.

I don't actually have the game (videogame cash is a little short at the moment), so I can't go about it myself.

And on that note, does the ladder in the house end up going anywhere? I played the trial and now I'm curious.

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Excellent post! You've made me want to play the game and see for myself now.

Yeah same here. I haven't touched my 360 since playing Halo 3 when that came out. Now I want to check this baby out.

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Guest acidmonkey

Not sure if anyone has noticed, but apparently in the credits (I have not seen this myself - at work at the moment), there is a poem that goes like this:

Beginning of Credits:

Who has seen the wind?

Neither you nor I:

But when the trees bow down their heads

The wind is passing by

- Christina Rosetti

Ending:

The wind is passing thro'

but when the leaves hang trembling

Neither I nor you:

Who has seen the wind

Looking up the actual poem:

Who has seen the wind?

Neither I nor you.

But when the leaves hang trembling,

The wind is passing through.

Who has seen the wind?

Neither you nor I.

But when the trees bow down their heads,

The wind is passing by.

In Braid, the last 4 stanzas are said first. Then the first 4 stanzas are said - in reverse order.

(As in: Lines 5-6-7-8-4-3-2-1)

Also, you can rewind time in the credits too.

Significance? I have no idea. =p

(Also, great discussion so far. I've read every single post)

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Guest Carnaby Crimson
Tim wants, like nothing else, to find the Princess, to know her at last. For Tim this would be momentous, sparking an intense light that embraces the world, a light that reveals the secrets long kept from us, that illuminates - or materialises! - a final palace where we can exist in peace.
Off in the distance, Tim saw a castle where the flags flutter even when the

wind has expired, and the bread in the kitchen is always warm. A little bit of

magic.

Possible references to heaven?

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jetsetbraidxk9.png

Um, I'm in a weird mood, I don't know why I just made that.

LOL. I don't think Maria would take kindly to being referred to as a mere 'housekeeper'...

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Not sure if anyone has noticed, but apparently in the credits (I have not seen this myself - at work at the moment), there is a poem that goes like this:

Looking up the actual poem:

In Braid, the last 4 stanzas are said first. Then the first 4 stanzas are said - in reverse order.

(As in: Lines 5-6-7-8-4-3-2-1)

Also, you can rewind time in the credits too.

Significance? I have no idea. =p

(Also, great discussion so far. I've read every single post)

he lives his life in reverse, always doing the opposite, the game plays in reverse (world one is the start and comes at the end)....the poem is backwards. everything is in reverse basically

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Guest jagged

I wish Jonathon Blow would just sell a book detailing the story of braid. I mean, he said that his game wasn't being profitable, so why not get some more revenue? I'm pretty sure anybody who played this would wanna buy it, just add in some artwork and the making of the game, and you're good to go.

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I wish Jonathon Blow would just sell a book detailing the story of braid. I mean, he said that his game wasn't being profitable, so why not get some more revenue? I'm pretty sure anybody who played this would wanna buy it, just add in some artwork and the making of the game, and you're good to go.

It kind of defeats the point he wanted to make with the game: his aim was to push gaming forward as an experience. Same goes for the narrative, that was specifically created for this medium.

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Apologies if this has already been posted, but I thought Tim's castle at the end of the game (built from the square icons of each level) looked remarkably like a colour-banded periodic table. No idea which elements were being implied though...

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