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Yiggy

Camera Creativity Technical Thread

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I don't really tend to shoot that sort of thing at all, but the biggest arguement against asking first is you'll end up with a posed picture, rather than capturing what caught your eye in the first place.

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Now I have thoughts that scribble may be one of those up skirt types :lol:

I would say there are a couple of ways to approach this;

1. Carry change in your pocket, useful for buskers and street entertainers who are usually more that happy to have a picture taken once you've thrown something in the pot.

2. Same as 1 but approaching homeless, could be awkward as you don't want some nutter chasing you down the street with his dog.

3. Candid ~ By the sounds of it scribbles method :ph34r:

4. Talk to the person(s) first.

With number 4, you may get posed shots like MrPogo has said - However, with a bit of luck you could get a posed candid or actually have that person in action so to speak.

I'll be approaching something soon which will probably be a struggle, model releases - I'm thinking it's probably best to get you speech down to a T and approach them first, unless of course, there's some sort of opportunity to take a picture before speaking with someone.

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SpongeManTim, i too recently purchased a 450d. I too also noticed hot pixels and tried the remapping trick a few times, there are quite a few resources out there which tell you how to do a manual remap which is a little different to the auto sensor clean (doesnt involve anything technical). which fixed my issues. I also noticed for some reason that shooting in raw i didn't notice them as much. Now my 450d shoots how i'd expect it to.

I'll see you in the compo thread soon.

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So... B+W conversions...

3521110_bcae4649c7ca347e7c20ee40dceae0bf_large.jpg

3521111_882a7859911e28b14ce4fdd97945461d_large.jpg

That's the first I've done in a while. Did it in iPhoto, just turned the colour saturation down to zero, then messed with various sliders to get the contrast up. Is that the general idea, or am I missing something?

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You can do it all sorts of ways, to me the above looks pretty bright on the walls.

This is a quick one I tried;

Liamness_BW.jpg

That was basically just a grayscale conversion - But then you can start playing with curves and whatnot.

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I think Liamness has the right idea. There's no black, nor white in yours DK, just lots of differing greys.

I don't have PS on this PC to have a play but I use channel mixer. Click the little check box for greyscale (is it? or monotone, I can't remember). Then I set the bottom slider down to about -12 to -14 (can't remember the name of that either, constant?). Then play with the RGB levels until you get what you want. I find that R is always up near 60 and G&B nearer 30-40.

I hope that awful description helps!

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I follow the same kind of idea as Agent L, but photoshop has a black and white convert tool, that lets you again change the seperate channels. I usually just adjust them until im close to what I want, then use curves to change contrast in the areas I want more impact in.

It depends on the look your going for really, with b/w I prefer fairly high contrast images, so would prefer the look of Liamness' conversion (although it is a little too extreme in areas).

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What's the best way of taking pictures in the relative dark without using a flash with moving objects (eg people)? i tried the other day with the stock lens of my camera that only goes down to f3.8 or something, chucked the ISO up to about 3200 and still had pretty long exposure times. Is there anythign I can do with the flash of my D90 to make it pop up a bit later, or earlier, so that it doesn't looks so light?

or should I have been trying this with my f1.8 50mm prime?

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What's the best way of taking pictures in the relative dark without using a flash with moving objects (eg people)? i tried the other day with the stock lens of my camera that only goes down to f3.8 or something, chucked the ISO up to about 3200 and still had pretty long exposure times. Is there anythign I can do with the flash of my D90 to make it pop up a bit later, or earlier, so that it doesn't looks so light?

or should I have been trying this with my f1.8 50mm prime?

You can set the flash to fire at the start, or the end of an exposure. I know on the D80 you can use a manual mode for the flash, which lets you adjust the power of it, so you could use that to give less power to the flash. But best option would be the 50mm, you'll get much more natural looking results from that, without flash. Depending on how dark it is though you might still struggle. Flash gun is the answer there im afraid!

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You can set the flash to fire at the start, or the end of an exposure. I know on the D80 you can use a manual mode for the flash, which lets you adjust the power of it, so you could use that to give less power to the flash. But best option would be the 50mm, you'll get much more natural looking results from that, without flash. Depending on how dark it is though you might still struggle. Flash gun is the answer there im afraid!

EEEhh, cheers!

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Right.... I have Photoshop 8 (think it was the first CS version), so how do I do HDR-photos? I have a 30D: do I take a photo at the correct exposure and then bracket two shutter speeds below and above this? Can the camera do this automatically or do I change the settings myself? How do I actually put them together in Photoshop, or is there a better dedicated HDR application?

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Photomatix seems to be one of the better plugins or dedicated apps for HDR, there may also be a script or auto function located in your version of PS for HDR though (but no sure due to your version).

In the menu of the 30D, you should just set the AEB amount by -2/+2 - Then correctly expose for the picture and fire away, you'll then need to set the AEB back to 0 when you no longer require AEB.

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Right, I've been asked to take pictures of a musician friend of mine for his press pack. So I'm off around the country side with him tomorrow. I've never really taken pictures of people before, does anyone have any advice? I'll be shooting b/w film only for what it's worth.

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A bump into 2009.

How do you guys sharpen?

Its always been something I've found to be a little problematic.. to know when to sharpen, and when I've sharpened an image too much. I was using the Lightroom tools to do it for the last few months, but I seem to get better results from unsharp mask in PS. I don't quite 'get' using different sharpening for screen and print. Something to do with noticing mistakes much easier on screen?

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I don't really print, so it's never really been a great problem for me.

I rarely use unsharp mask, try a high pass filter at around 3.5 to 5 with an overlay, just back off the opacity until you find something you like.

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A bump into 2009.

How do you guys sharpen?

Its always been something I've found to be a little problematic.. to know when to sharpen, and when I've sharpened an image too much. I was using the Lightroom tools to do it for the last few months, but I seem to get better results from unsharp mask in PS. I don't quite 'get' using different sharpening for screen and print. Something to do with noticing mistakes much easier on screen?

Numbers can change dependant on the subject and the size of the image but typically I would do something like:

USM

Amount 30%

pixels 25

threshold 2

This increases the contrast of the image - fade if too much. Then after all other edits on a separate layer I would do:

USM

Amount 85%

pixels 1.3

threshold 3

layer set to blend luminosity, somewhere between 40% and 75% depending if there are any obvious sharpened edges - zoom to 150% and look for obvious processed high contrast edges.

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Numbers can change dependant on the subject and the size of the image but typically I would do something like:

USM

Amount 30%

pixels 25

threshold 2

This increases the contrast of the image - fade if too much. Then after all other edits on a separate layer I would do:

USM

Amount 85%

pixels 1.3

threshold 3

layer set to blend luminosity, somewhere between 40% and 75% depending if there are any obvious sharpened edges - zoom to 150% and look for obvious processed high contrast edges.

Interesting- what does the threshold slider do?

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Interesting- what does the threshold slider do?

threshold is the difference between light and dark pixels. The larger the threshold the less USM will increase edge contrast. these are just numbers of my default actions. Its best to play about with the numbers and see what works best for you.

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threshold is the difference between light and dark pixels. The larger the threshold the less USM will increase edge contrast. these are just numbers of my default actions. Its best to play about with the numbers and see what works best for you.

Yeah, totally. I've fired off a set of photos to the printers all with different levels of USM sharpening, and a few with Lightroom sharpening. See what happens...

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Yeah, totally. I've fired off a set of photos to the printers all with different levels of USM sharpening, and a few with Lightroom sharpening. See what happens...

you might find that for print sharpening you will get away with a bit more sharpening than you would for screen.

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By bracketing you'll be recording the relevant information at the desired exposures for the scene, by trying doing this from lets say a single image in post, you'll be pushing the image information to the limit. This will probably result in a loss of image information as well as problems like noise.

I'm not too sure what you mean by using adjustable sliders on three images in Photoshop though, could you be a little more specific so that we could see what you mean/are trying to accomplish.

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