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Camera Creativity Technical Thread

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I would consider shutter speed against the position you'll take the subjects, like 1/250 if the subject is approaching you, or possibly 1/800 upwards if side to side/panning.

Surely you mean those shutter speeds the other way round Dork? 1/800 side on will totally freeze the action and there will be no sense of motion whatsoever. Karts aren't that fast so 'maybe' 1/250 would be OK head on. I would be trying to use 1/250 as an absolute fastest shutter speed for side on panning too. Indoors on 'normal' speed karts then I'd be tempted to go as low as 1/60. Or, stick the flash on second curtain and run at about 1/10 to get weird effects and then a frozen kart at the end of the motion.

Focus on AI Servo, camera on shutter priority (TV or whatever it's called on a Nikon), ISO will doubtless need to be quite high if you're indoors. Don't know what lenses you have TMB but the biggest aperture you have could well come in very handy. I think you could use up to 200mm indoors to but wide angle (18-25mm ish) pans look pretty cool when you can get close to the action and you can pan with anything.

Dork's dead right about the lighting though, take a grey card reading if you can or just chimp a few test shots to see how the auto is coping, or just look at the lights and select the right WB mode accordingly :lol:

Strangely, I have a work karting event on Tuesday next week but it's outdoors, no-one's asked me to do the photos though, I may volunteer.

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Surely you mean those shutter speeds the other way round Dork? 1/800 side on will totally freeze the action and there will be no sense of motion whatsoever. Karts aren't that fast so 'maybe' 1/250 would be OK head on. I would be trying to use 1/250 as an absolute fastest shutter speed for side on panning too. Indoors on 'normal' speed karts then I'd be tempted to go as low as 1/60. Or, stick the flash on second curtain and run at about 1/10 to get weird effects and then a frozen kart at the end of the motion.

No I mean those speeds, 1/250 should be fine for many things approaching you at speed as they shouldn't appear to be travelling that fast - I was playing about with panning at high shutter speed on the weekend as I wanted to freeze the water (no point in slow shutter speed here as it's crappy water and no real parts in motion). Here's an example;

Cardiff_Bay_Water_Skiing_05.jpg

Dork's dead right about the lighting though, take a grey card reading if you can or just chimp a few test shots to see how the auto is coping, or just look at the lights and select the right WB mode accordingly :lol:

Yeah, indoor lighting will be a bugger - But if you take a picture of the grey card with a subject, then in PS using Camera RAW (assuming you have it) you can use the White Balance Tool to acquire the correct WB for the environment, this may do a better job than the camera - However, you may have more pleasing results switching through the WB Defaults.

Ok, if inside and close to the action I would probably be up around 1/1000 as you will probably be pretty close - You may want to practise panning, if there are colourful banners then it could make for a good blurred background.

Agent L,

I should have expanded on that to say that you would want a slower shutter speed for the blurred backgrounds, as you said 1/60 or even 1/30 (or even go slower and get creative, so long as you have enough memory space).

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I fully get you now DK, the boat shots explains it all. Youre totally right about panning on water but I just wanted TMB to see that karts will need to show movement so pan slower. To be honest though, as it's just a work thing people may just want to see themselves in the kart rather than the photgraphers skill so just shooting everything at 1/500 and getting loads more keepers may be a winner!

1/60th will result in lots of blurry shots no matter how good you are.

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No doubt he'll be there for a while so plenty of time to experiment :lol:

I've read Understanding Shutter Speed which gives you all sorts of ideas, pretty good book IMO (if you can stand Bryan Peterson of Understanding Exposure fame).

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No doubt he'll be there for a while so plenty of time to experiment :lol:

Absolutely. My colleagues just want some nice shots of them looking cool in the Karts but it's a chance for me to practice being more creative. I am always moaning that I don't have enough time to go out with my camera and this is a good opportunity. Might even be an excuse to buy a new lens.

Thanks to you both.

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I thought the whole point in panning was to blur the background but get a sharp main subject? If your shooting at really fast shutter speeds then it wont make any difference if you pan, if anything i would think you would make it less sharp in doing so? Im just going by what seems right in my head, ive never tried panning! But I dont think 1/1000th will be an option indoors, unless you whack the iso right up you'll end up with a lot of very dull photos! I suppose a lot of experimenting would be best, and stick with anything you find works!

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Personally I see panning as trying to keep with the subject, if something goes whizzing past you, it would be best to pan rather than try and capture your subject from a stationary point of view (unless you have a good angle and the subject(s) will pass in all the same spots) - Of course you can slow the shutter speed to blur the background, however, there would be no point in slowing your shutter speed if you have a bland background as there wouldn't be any real colour to blur.

That's just my take on it though.

As for the lighting it could be tough, with a bit of luck there may be a lot of natural light.

I've been asked to shoot (outside) at an equestrian event this weekend, if the weather is bad then it wont be possible - However, someone else is shooting indoors with a Nikon D3 and he said it's terrible, sulphur lighting or something and he has issues - So I may play about in there although I doubt I would get any worthwhile shots.

All best to play about though and see what happens.

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Personally I see panning as trying to keep with the subject, if something goes whizzing past you, it would be best to pan rather than try and capture your subject from a stationary point of view (unless you have a good angle and the subject(s) will pass in all the same spots) - Of course you can slow the shutter speed to blur the background, however, there would be no point in slowing your shutter speed if you have a bland background as there wouldn't be any real colour to blur.

That's just my take on it though.

As for the lighting it could be tough, with a bit of luck there may be a lot of natural light.

I've been asked to shoot (outside) at an equestrian event this weekend, if the weather is bad then it wont be possible - However, someone else is shooting indoors with a Nikon D3 and he said it's terrible, sulphur lighting or something and he has issues - So I may play about in there although I doubt I would get any worthwhile shots.

All best to play about though and see what happens.

I do agree, i think its just a grey area as to wether the term "panning" means following the subject with a slower shutter speed, or just following the subject regardless of effect your looking for. I suppose either way the term is correct. Im just used to reading about it for use with slow shutter speeds etc. Its something ive never tried, but I got a telephoto recently and im going to an airshow in a few weeks, so no doubt i'll be giving it a bash! :P

Also, if the D3 was struggling with the light it must be bad! ;) Thats the only thing that would tempt an upgrade for me really, to maybe the D90 or D300 for better iso performance. The D80 is pretty much unuseable at higher than iso800 ive found, but my main muse is landscapes anyway so its not that much of an issue!

On that subject i was thinking of buying a David Noton dvd - Chasing the Light. He always writes for Practical Photography and I really enjoy his work, anyone else got this or know of any good landscape books/dvd's?

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Also, if the D3 was struggling with the light it must be bad! :P Thats the only thing that would tempt an upgrade for me really, to maybe the D90 or D300 for better iso performance. The D80 is pretty much unuseable at higher than iso800 ive found, but my main muse is landscapes anyway so its not that much of an issue!

I use a Canon 400D and I don't like to go above ISO 400, I like to pretty much use available light but think I'll be stuffed if I can't shoot outside on the weekend (no flash photography allowed).

When I return to work I will definitely look to upgrade to full frame next year.

I'll have a scout for the David Noton DVD this morning to see if it's any good.

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I was using the D300 this weekend for a house party/gig, having to go between ISO 1800 and 3200, now there is obviously a lot of noise, but not enough to ruin the shots.

2831326498_8506aeaa5a_b.jpg@3200

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We have a work karting event on Monday and as one of the guys once spotted a photography magazine on my desk, I have been asked to do the photos on the day. I'll take along my D40x. Any tips on capturing the action?

I might as well chime in with my 2 cents as well :(

I think your shutter speed should depend on how far away they are from you, are you really standing right next to the circuit?

If so, then I doubt the AF will manage, as I've noticed with my camera shooting a bicycle race at night, with them flying past you..

What I tried next was to turn OFF the autofocus, focus on one point (a distance scale on the lens helps here, but you can just prefocus on a spot if you want), pan and shoot.

9867771C43B4449A9F17226829C97ED7.jpg

833E7DFFC57F4F2AA863ABBD49D8A16F.jpg

83711271497940E4BBBC979EC9E6FBF8-800.jpg

I don't get the aversion against high-iso, especially if you use it for the web, approx. ISO 8500 on the 30D works fine for me,

252BFB8276DC43B0BFE12BEC3F8B6894.jpg

06430E4570A54BF8B323A00137D1BD62-800.jpg

Personally, I´d rather get a noisy picture than no picture at all. :lol:

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This is true, but sometimes it just really annoys me, noise in general sometimes adds to the shot, but its colour noise that gets to me, if digital produced similar noise to film grain then it wouldnt be so bad, but the multicoloured dots that you get from digital looks horrible! But your right, if its only smaller sizes then you can get away with it I suppose.

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Never tried noise reduction software, Iwan? :(

I've given NoiseNinja a try before, but I found it just made the pictures look muddy and pastel like, although I didnt mess around with it that much to get the settings right! Plus, i got my flashgun now, so low light doesnt pose as much of a problem anymore! :D

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How did the karting go themomentbefore? I did take my camera along to mine yesterday and got a lot of good shots. I've decided that these public type karts are easy to take shots of compared to 'proper' motorsport, they seemed so slow, was outdoors though so made a lot easier.

Was it tough inside?

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This is probably my favourite from the day. Shame the waterproof suits they provided made it look like an abattoir workers team build though.

1/200

f5

ISO 640 - Raining and overcast all day.

200mm

Shutter priority

post-3170-1221041025_thumb.jpg

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I've played about with image blending in PS, basically move the one image on top of the other, add a layer mask then select a brush and your opacity and start to brush the layer - Then you can use Alt+Ctrl+Shift+E to dump it to a new flattened layer.

I've basically started to do this for when I have "blinkies" aka Highlight issues.

EDIT: I've not read them but someone else on another forum linked to these;

http://www.photoshopcafe.com/tutorials/blend/blend.html

http://www.heathrowe.com/tuts/blending.asp

EDIT (Again): PS also has a script to stack layers, this is in a tutorial I recently watched - However, I've not used it has if the images don't match (moving clouds or whatnot) PS throws a bit of a fit... apparently.

Edited by Dork Knight

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I think you'd do it with post processing, blending the layers at 100% opacity and using a "lightness blend" (or something like that). This will recreate the effect of a double exposure by 'adding' the exposures, rather than just taking the halfway point. You'd probably tweak it a bit from there, but that's the general idea.

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I recently bought a 450D, my first dSLR camera. I've been really enjoying learning everything about it. Great fun. I'll be in the monthly contest soon ;)

Anyway, I've been trying some night time shots and I started noticing long exposure shots have little red spots showing up. Then this morning I noticed, on ISO 1600, f4.5 at 1/20 they were there again in the dark areas. As an extreme example I shot with the lens cap on for a couple of seconds and the resulting image, which I would have expected to be black, is absolutely littered with spots, as well as a couple of bigger red spots (image below at 100% crop). Is this dust? Is it the lens or sensor causing this? How do I stop it?

exampleef2.jpg

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Hmmm, I've tried those sensor cleaning tricks from DK's link (and many others recommending the same) but they're still there. In fact there are three that consistently appear. I tried the dead pixel test software I found on another forum and a test at 1/20 was all clear up to ISO1600 where there were suddenly about 600 hot pixels, of which those three are by far the most noticeable. Anything over 1 second exposure shows them up on lower ISOs.

Some people are saying it's just normal to have them. I don't really know if I should gamble on replacing it, as I may get a replacement that has more? Should I settle with it, accept it as part of digital life, and rely on software to remove them?

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If you purchased it from a High Street Store then I would attempt to replace it, explain and possibly show them the issue and inform them you would like a replacement - However, ask if the replacement could be tested there and then as you would be extremely unhappy if you have to travel back to the store if the replacement exhibits the same issue.

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Yeah I got it from Currys but I'd left it too long, the receipt says replacement up to 28 days. I could send it to Canon for them to map them out or whatever, but I think I can probably live with it. I'll see. If I do end up doing a decent amount of long exposure shots then I might send it off. The Canon warranty is longer obviously so I'll see how it goes.

Ok, another question, not a technical question but I figure best here rather than starting a new thread:

Photographing people in public. How do you all go about it? Say for example you went to a typical town market and wanted to arse around taking photos of the stalls, the workers and the punters. Would you go out of your way to OK it first with the stall holders? Or would you just shoot away and not worry? I don't want people to get pissed off or think I'm shifty or whatever, and end up getting arrested on terrorism charges or beaten up, or something equally melodramatic and unlikely. I think the law is on my side to just start taking photos, but does common courtesy come into it?

I guess one of the things I have to get over is how self conscious I feel getting the camera out in public, especially with the telephoto lens. I feel like a right cunt sometimes. I'm sure no one cares or even notices, but you know, self conscious and all that, especially as I'm still learning lots and spend half the time playing with settings or trying to shield the sun from the screen to review shots and generally being a n00b.

So yeah, how do you approach that sort of situation?

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