Jump to content
rllmuk
Sign in to follow this  
Yiggy

Camera Creativity Technical Thread

Recommended Posts

And Bridge + CS3 is WAY faster. I only use them for what I COULD do in LR. But LR is hilariously slow for me with a huge library. Going to try it again on my new uber PC, but don't hold out much hope.

Re: Nikons - the D40/60/70/80 love to overexpose slightly. It's better for 'full auto' shooters but bad for us. Think about dialling in -0.3 or -0.7 'most' of the time in well lit situations. There's been plenty written about this on the net.

Re: ISO- stick to 100 unless you can't get the shot you want. Rule of thumb is the slowest shutter speed you can hand hold is 1/focal length. So with a 50mm prime, you can shoot at around 1/50th before camera shake might be noticeable. Obviously YMMV, you can often squeeze 1/30th out of that lens too. The more you zoom, the faster the handheld shutter speed you can get away with is. All this applies only to stationary subject. Once you bring in people or any action, you have to go much faster. The only way you can do this and get properly exposed pics, if it's dark, is to up the ISO as required.

Think about 400 or 800 for most indoor stuff, especially in the evenings. I regularly shoot 1600 at gigs. The noise profile of the d80 is fairly friendly - the photos look grainy but in a 'filmic' way, so it's not too bad.... plus noise ninja ftw! (CS3 plug in)

Finally, if you are upping ISO a lot, exposure becomes a lot more important. You can easily recover 1-2 stops on an ISO 100 photos because it's so clean anyway. Adjusting levels and curves on something 2 stops underexposed at ISO800 is a lot harder as you exacerbate the grain as you go lighter. Better to go 1600 than think you can shop a badly underexposed 800 IME....

That's my little shooting-at-lots-of-gigs-experience-ISO-summary :D

Phew!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome, cheers for that RJ. Do you have a link to where I can grab that Ninja Noise CS3 plug-in?

On another note, I'm looking into learning some HDR but I don't quite understand it. Is is simply mapping an overexposed image into the same image that is underexposed, to capture the lights and darks of each image into one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sort of - you give the software images exposed a certain number of stops apart, and then it uses the different values from those exposures to map the brightness of each pixel into a much larger space (so, for instance, instead of having 1,000 possible brightnesses for a pixel, you now have 1,000,000,000). After that, you have an image with a lot more brightness information. However, in order to display it on a monitor or print it, you need to "tone map" it back to a lower amount of brightnesses. There are various methods of doing this: you can just squish the values up so that they fit in the space, which means you'll end up with a fairly normal looking photo but without too much under or over exposure, or you can use "local contrast enhancement" which relies on the fact that your eyes are only really looking at one part of a photo at a time, so as long as the contrast in each area looks OK, the whole photo will look OK. It's this second method that's used on the most famous type of HDR image that you see all over flickr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick question regarding the Nikon D80, does anyone know if it should tell you what point you are focusing on? I know with my Canon 350D it used to flash red the point it had focused on, with the D80 it just seems to flash every focus point in the viewfinder when it locks onto things, which makes manual focus pretty hard to get right. Ive looked at the manual but all I can find is how to change the focus point for AF. Would I just need to select a focus point in the same way, and wait for the in focus circle to appear in the viewfinder? Its just annoying, as I dont like faffing about changing loads when I switch to manual focus!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow night I am going to see an outdoor production of A Midsummer Nights Dream. The gates open at 6:30 and the show starts at 7:30. I'll be taking my D40 with me along with the kit lens and a 55mm- 200mm lens.

This will be my first ever opportunity to shoot people outside (thast aren't my friends and running away from me) and I really want to nail it.

Have you guys got any tips for me at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image Stabilizer? I figure if you are shooting at night the shutter will have to stay open longer than normal which means shakes can blur your pictures - my Canon doesn't have this in the body but your Nikon might, I have to get lenses which have IS, the Canon kit lens does not...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does the kit lens come with IS?

On the D40? No it doesn't come with VR (Nikon's version of IS) They do a version of it that does I think but its not the kit one.

Shouldn't be too much of a problem during Daylight even at 55mm though so long as you hold her steady. A good tip is to wrap the camera strap round your arm and under your elbow keeping it taught. Or lean against something if you can, particularly as the light starts to fade and shutter speed drops.

Remember with the D40 you might want to put the exposure compensation up to +0.3 or even +0.7 providing you are shooting in Program mode or priority mode as the light meter tends to over expose slightly. You can check your shots by checking the histogram (press down a couple of times on the 4 way button when viewing a shot) to see how it thinks they have exposed. The graph wants to be in a curved n shape going from left to right. This is quite useful in bad lighting conditions if you cant see the screen properly. Bad sunlight for example.

Sorry for the stupid question but do you know how to use Manual mode? If you dont its worth squeezing off a few shots. I wasn't sure how long you had had it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Image Stabilizer? I figure if you are shooting at night the shutter will have to stay open longer than normal which means shakes can blur your pictures - my Canon doesn't have this in the body but your Nikon might, I have to get lenses which have IS, the Canon kit lens does not...

IIRC, all the Canon Kit Packages now have IS - Really, if you're shooting at night you want to try and use a tripod wherever possible IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Remember with the D40 you might want to put the exposure compensation up to +0.3 or even +0.7 providing you are shooting in Program mode or priority mode as the light meter tends to over expose slightly.

Surely, if it overexposes by default, then adding +0.3 or +0.7 overexposes it even more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've tinkered with manual mode. I do try to change the settings, that way I can see what changes, I figured its a good way to learn. I'm right at the start of a learning curve, but its good fun and I have shot some photos I am really happy with so far.

Chances like tomorrow don't happen often so I wanted to make sure I don't miss a trick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay I wanted to ask about focus. When I take a shot of anything from a relatively short distance I find that Autofocus never gives a sharp image all round. Is this just a limitation of the autofocus? My D40 only has 3 autofocus points. In this pic for example...

2768528083_be2276749f.jpg

You can see that the corners are quite out of focus, as are parts of the top and the bottom. The focus point was in the centre. The shot was taken at something like 20mm from a close distance.

Is the only way to get a shot like this sharp all round to use manual focus?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay I wanted to ask about focus. When I take a shot of anything from a relatively short distance I find that Autofocus never gives a sharp image all round. Is this just a limitation of the autofocus? My D40 only has 3 autofocus points. In this pic for example...

2768528083_be2276749f.jpg

You can see that the corners are quite out of focus, as are parts of the top and the bottom. The focus point was in the centre. The shot was taken at something like 20mm from a close distance.

Is the only way to get a shot like this sharp all round to use manual focus?

That may be down to the quality of the actual lens itself. A lot of lens suffer from corner softness I think, and shooting something close will probably magnify the problem. What aperture was that shot at? Sometimes a lower aperture can help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay I wanted to ask about focus. When I take a shot of anything from a relatively short distance I find that Autofocus never gives a sharp image all round. Is this just a limitation of the autofocus? My D40 only has 3 autofocus points. In this pic for example...

2768528083_be2276749f.jpg

You can see that the corners are quite out of focus, as are parts of the top and the bottom. The focus point was in the centre. The shot was taken at something like 20mm from a close distance.

Is the only way to get a shot like this sharp all round to use manual focus?

I think thats the quality of the lens.. looks like drop off. Nikon 18-200?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That may be down to the quality of the actual lens itself. A lot of lens suffer from corner softness I think, and shooting something close will probably magnify the problem. What aperture was that shot at? Sometimes a lower aperture can help.

It was shot at f/4.5 which in hindsight should have been 8-11 as an optimum for the lens as I didn't have a background to consider. I always forget things like this when I take a shot but in my defence this one was taken in program mode. I need a checklist of things to go through before I click the shutter I think.

If you dont want to focus on one particular spot in a shot like this would people normally switch to manual focus though? Or stick with AF?

And yes it was my 18-200 lens. At 44mm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've just got a make your own pin-hole camera kit. Any advice on taking pin hole pictures? How long is an average shutter speed, etc?

I really have no idea.

Depends on the size of the hole, where you are, etc.. so.. more details plz! :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Erm, the whole is about 1mm, maybe smaller. Will probably be outside... I know that pin hole camera normally need long exposer times- will i need to find a way to attach it to a tripod?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Erm, the whole is about 1mm, maybe smaller. Will probably be outside... I know that pin hole camera normally need long exposer times- will i need to find a way to attach it to a tripod?

duct-tape.jpg

Best thing to do is scan the hole and measure it.. if its mm, everything will be out of focus, most likely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think thats the quality of the lens.. looks like drop off. Nikon 18-200?

Hmm. Only the corners on the right are out of focus, and a decrease in sharpness due to drop off usually wouldn't be noticeable at that size. Maybe the focal plane is really wierd, or more likely the camera wasn't straight with the subject? But yeah, that's not a problem with the autofocus.

If you've made the shift from digital compacts to SLRs, the fact that you have to control what is in focus and what is not may come as a shock. The shorter depth of field is often desirable, though, for example when you want a blurred background for a portrait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a work karting event on Monday and as one of the guys once spotted a photography magazine on my desk, I have been asked to do the photos on the day. I'll take along my D40x. Any tips on capturing the action?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it will all depend on a few things, but I might be wrong.

I would consider shutter speed against the position you'll take the subjects, like 1/250 if the subject is approaching you, or possibly 1/800 upwards if side to side/panning.

Oh, and lighting - Do you know if this will be indoors as you may have crappy lighting, perhaps take along a grey card if you're shooting in RAW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think it will all depend on a few things, but I might be wrong.

I would consider shutter speed against the position you'll take the subjects, like 1/250 if the subject is approaching you, or possibly 1/800 upwards if side to side/panning.

Oh, and lighting - Do you know if this will be indoors as you may have crappy lighting, perhaps take along a grey card if you're shooting in RAW.

Thanks DK. Yeah, we are inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, if inside and close to the action I would probably be up around 1/1000 as you will probably be pretty close - You may want to practise panning, if there are colourful banners then it could make for a good blurred background.

If you have a grey card take it, especially if you use Photoshop & RAW - You may already know this - as you can take a picture with your subject and grey card under the lighting environment. Then, with post processing (I only know CS3) you can select your custom white balance off the grey card in the picture.

You could also use the cameras custom white balance - Why not both to be on the safe side.

I've tried panning once, this past weekend, it was difficult IMO - But should get better with practise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.