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In Fabric (2019)

 

In Fabric is a haunting ghost story set against the backdrop of a busy winter sales period in a department store and follows the life of a cursed dress as it passes from person to person, with devastating consequences..

 

I think Kermode described it as a mix between Susperia and Are You Being Served, and he’s right in the best possible way. I’ve always liked Peter Strickland’s films, but this is the first one I’ve loved. It truly is a bizarre and bonkers film, but somehow Strickland always completely sells his wired alternative realities to me. By the end I was believing that detailing the inner workings of a washing machine can be hypnotically erotic, and that a dress can fly.

 

Like Chungking Express, this was apparently meant to cover more stories revolving around the dress, but they ended up focusing on two. Apparently Strickland would like to make another film telling the other tales. Here’s hoping.

 

5/5

7A2F14F2-4CF9-494B-A55A-A8D837ECBDA6.jpeg

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55 minutes ago, Bazjam said:

In Fabric (2019)

 

In Fabric is a haunting ghost story set against the backdrop of a busy winter sales period in a department store and follows the life of a cursed dress as it passes from person to person, with devastating consequences..

 

I think Kermode described it as a mix between Susperia and Are You Being Served, and he’s right in the best possible way. I’ve always liked Peter Strickland’s films, but this is the first one I’ve loved. It truly is a bizarre and bonkers film, but somehow Strickland always completely sells his wired alternative realities to me. By the end I was believing that detailing the inner workings of a washing machine can be hypnotically erotic, and that a dress can fly.

 

Like Chungking Express, this was apparently meant to cover more stories revolving around the dress, but they ended up focusing on two. Apparently Strickland would like to make another film telling the other tales. Here’s hoping.

 

5/5

7A2F14F2-4CF9-494B-A55A-A8D837ECBDA6.jpeg

 

Ooh excited! I'm same, they've all been interesting but none quite a classic. I'm all over that synopsis. 

 

Mid 90s

(Dir Jonah hill)

2018

 

A very sleight coming of age of kid as he discovers skating, weed and girls 

 

I really liked this despite it doing nothing new and hitting every beat you expect. 

 

It's essentially a Made in England/Kids sandwich without any of the spicy ingredients. It rarely gets any deeper than a bit of sibling rivalry or a skating accident. 

 

But the upside of that is that you get to revel in the nostalgia a bit more, and have an overall nicer time. Killer soundtrack, great authentic 90s photography (with added neg scratches and v-sync issues).

 

It's easy listening the movie. But very enjoyable with great central performances (although too much swearing)

 

3.5/5

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18 hours ago, ZOK said:

 

Have you read the Thompson book? I always fancy watching that flick but I hold the novel in such high regard - just like everything else by Jim Thompson really - that I don’t want to observe anything that might displease me.

 

I've read a few Jim Thompsons but not The Grifters. Even though it's set in the 90's it has a very 50's noir feel to it. I think you'd like it.

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The Red Turtle

(2017)

 

How have I never seen this before? Dialogue free French/Japanese allegorical animation about a man stranded on a desert island and the Red Turtle that comes out of its shell to save him, and possibly all of humanity. 

 

I was mesmerised. It's beautiful to look at, listen to, and ponder on. 

 

My flatmate laughed at me becoming invested at one point early on, going "its a cartoon stupid", then there is a bit about an hour in where she literally gasp "Oh please no!". 

 

I especially liked the three quarter angle the whole movie seemed to be framed in. We're nearly always looking down from some heightened view at the microcosm. As if we're mother nature herself or somesuch. I'd love to know if there was any reasoning given beyond how nice it made it to look at.

 

Simply gorgeous.

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1 hour ago, kerraig UK said:

The Red Turtle

(2017)

 

How have I never seen this before? Dialogue free French/Japanese allegorical animation about a man stranded on a desert island and the Red Turtle that comes out of its shell to save him, and possibly all of humanity. 

 

I was mesmerised. It's beautiful to look at, listen to, and ponder on. 

 

My flatmate laughed at me becoming invested at one point early on, going "its a cartoon stupid", then there is a bit about an hour in where she literally gasp "Oh please no!". 

 

I especially liked the three quarter angle the whole movie seemed to be framed in. We're nearly always looking down from some heightened view at the microcosm. As if we're mother nature herself or somesuch. I'd love to know if there was any reasoning given beyond how nice it made it to look at.

 

Simply gorgeous.

 

Spoiler

Was it the bit where he nearly gets stuck underwater?

 

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16 minutes ago, Stigweard said:

 

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Was it the bit where he nearly gets stuck underwater?

 

Spoiler

That was my bit. Becki's bit was when the kid falls in the same crack.

 

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54 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:
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That was my bit. Becki's bit was when the kid falls in the same crack.

 

 

Spoiler

I cant watch squeezing through caves like that, so even in cartoon form it got to me. 

 

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Yesterday (cinema, 2019)

 

When struggling musician Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) get hit by a bus he wakes up in a world where no one except him has ever heard of The Beatles. He uses that knowledge to become the world's biggest star, but getting everything he ever wanted comes with hidden costs.

 

Yesterday's concept is so high it requires oxygen. It's a truly brilliant idea that requires a huge suspension of disbelief to pull off. Sadly, despite a strong cast and a selection of great tunes, Yesterday manages to fall flat on almost every level.

 

Screenwriter Richard Curtis mines his big book of cliches to deliver a weak script that never really explores its genuinely interesting premise. Yes there are fun little swipes suggesting that no Beatles means no Oasis, but Yesterday greatly downplays the sheer influence of The Beatles by suggesting that virtually every other musician you've ever heard of is alive and well, which ultimately downplays just what a big deal the Fab Four were.

 

There are several points in Yesterday's sugary-sweet script when it looks like director Danny Boyle wants to take the film in darker directions and they typically appear whenever Jack wrestles with his conscience and realises that he's ultimately living a lie, but Curtis's flimsy script keeps Boyle steering towards sachharine island and those tantalising 'what ifs' are simply left dangling. Jokes are overplayed (we learn via internet searches that The Beatles aren't the only things to be forgotten about in this new world) and you can see the ending coming from a mile away. 

 

It's helpful then that Yesterday's cast are genuinely engaging thanks to a charming turn from Patel, the ever-likeable Lily James and a wonderful turn from Kate McKinnon as a truly vile record manager who shows her disdain for her new star at every available opportunity. They're all on top form but their characters are so paper thin it's amazing that don't get blown away. Ed Sheeran is the biggest surprise, not because he's so game at sending himself off, but because he genuinely struggles to give a convincing performance that he's Ed Sheeran.

 

Yesterday's central idea promises much and it could have been something genuinely special, but it comes off as a missed opportunity and is content to simply wallow in cloying nostalgia. When Curtis took the idea to Boyle he should have just let it be.

2/5

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1 hour ago, strider said:

Yesterday (cinema, 2019)

 

When struggling musician Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) get hit by a bus he wakes up in a world where no one except him has ever heard of The Beatles. He uses that knowledge to become the world's biggest star, but getting everything he ever wanted comes with hidden costs.

 

Yesterday's concept is so high it requires oxygen. It's a truly brilliant idea that requires a huge suspension of disbelief to pull off. Sadly, despite a strong cast and a selection of great tunes, Yesterday manages to fall flat on almost every level.

 

Screenwriter Richard Curtis mines his big book of cliches to deliver a weak script that never really explores its genuinely interesting premise. Yes there are fun little swipes suggesting that no Beatles means no Oasis, but Yesterday greatly downplays the sheer influence of The Beatles by suggesting that virtually every other musician you've ever heard of is alive and well, which ultimately downplays just what a big deal the Fab Four were.

 

There are several points in Yesterday's sugary-sweet script when it looks like director Danny Boyle wants to take the film in darker directions and they typically appear whenever Jack wrestles with his conscience and realises that he's ultimately living a lie, but Curtis's flimsy script keeps Boyle steering towards sachharine island and those tantalising 'what ifs' are simply left dangling. Jokes are overplayed (we learn via internet searches that The Beatles aren't the only things to be forgotten about in this new world) and you can see the ending coming from a mile away. 

 

It's helpful then that Yesterday's cast are genuinely engaging thanks to a charming turn from Patel, the ever-likeable Lily Allen and a wonderful turn from Kate McKinnon as a truly vile record manager who shows her disdain for her new star at every available opportunity. They're all on top form but their characters are so paper thin it's amazing that don't get blown away. Ed Sheeran is the biggest surprise, not because he's so game at sending himself off, but because he genuinely struggles to give a convincing performance that he's Ed Sheeran.

 

Yesterday's central idea promises much and it could have been something genuinely special, but it comes off as a missed opportunity and is content to simply wallow in cloying nostalgia. When Curtis took the idea to Boyle he should have just let it be.

2/5

 

Considering the amount of time The Beatles spent in India and the amount it infused their sound I'm gutted more wasn't made of the appropriation coming full circle. But then its Curtis. He's like Metallica, desperately trying to match his earlier genius with his later tone deaf nonsense. 

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14 hours ago, strider said:

Ed Sheeran is the biggest surprise, not because he's so game at sending himself off, but because he genuinely struggles to give a convincing performance that he's Ed Sheeran.

 

In my experience, the ultimate example of a celebrity giving an unconvincing performance as themself must be Gary Linecker at the start of Bend it Like Beckham.

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On 02/07/2019 at 10:48, kerraig UK said:

The Red Turtle

(2017)

 

How have I never seen this before? Dialogue free French/Japanese allegorical animation about a man stranded on a desert island and the Red Turtle that comes out of its shell to save him, and possibly all of humanity. 

 

I was mesmerised. It's beautiful to look at, listen to, and ponder on. 

 

My flatmate laughed at me becoming invested at one point early on, going "its a cartoon stupid", then there is a bit about an hour in where she literally gasp "Oh please no!". 

 

I especially liked the three quarter angle the whole movie seemed to be framed in. We're nearly always looking down from some heightened view at the microcosm. As if we're mother nature herself or somesuch. I'd love to know if there was any reasoning given beyond how nice it made it to look at.

 

Simply gorgeous.

 

There's a brief moment near the end that just destroyed me. 

 

It's the scene at night where the older man is watching from behind the trees as the kid – now a young man – gradually gets further away from him, oblivious to his father looking on. I don't know if it's just because at the time I'd been thinking quite a bit about my own son growing up, but it left me in bits.

 

 

Wonderful film. 

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Avengement (2019)

A low-level gangster manages to get away from his prison guards and seek revenge for the death of his mother. Cor blimey, mate, it's been a while since I cast me mince pies on a Brit crime flick. I was proper lookin' forward to some uniquely British (ie London) argie-bargie, but what I got instead was a properly mixed-up over-complex revenge tale with a bit of totally gratutious GBH here and there, know what I mean? Scott Adkins, you'd think the boy would be deliverin' some serious quality aggro but everything here is on the level of a brawl in a pub car park, lots of join-the-queue punch-ups with extra foley, a bit of off-camera shooter action, bit of blood. Trouble is it felt disconnected from the actual yarn. And what a tedious, needlessly complicated yarn this was. Something to do with Adkin's brother (who else but Craig Fairbrass), a load of money, going down for a stretch, getting hard, doing the biz, bish bash bosh (literally) game over. I lost interest way before the ending which featured a sort of royalty-free general MIDI cover of Ennio Morricone's Chi Mai. Nah, jog on.

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My Beautiful Launderette

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091578/

 

An ambitious Pakistani Briton and his white boyfriend strive for success and hope when they open a glamorous laundromat.

 

I watched a couple of Stephen Frears films a while back and thought they were very impressive. So last night I watched this one which was his follow up to The Hit which I loved.

Set in inner-city London the story follows Omar, a young, first generation immigrant to London. He’s dropped out of college and is living an aimless life caring for his depressed, alcoholic father. He gets a job with his Uncle and soon finds himself managing a rundown launderette. As a result his world gets bigger and more exciting. He finds himself getting drawn into a World he never knew existed.

 

For some reason I had always thought this film was from the ‘depressing realism’ school but I was totally wrong. Yes, it is full of conflict (Omars idealistic left-wing father vs. his corrupt Thatcherite uncle, Pakistani culture vs. British culture, ambition vs. cost to society etc) but it also has this dreamy, woozy atmosphere that's really hypnotic. And a trippy, synth soundtrack. It reminded me a bit of The Long Good Friday the way it perfectly captured a snapshot of the time. That period in the 80’s just before everything changed forever.

 

This was really fantastic. The cast are all superb with a young Daniel Day Lewis the breakout performance. It looks incredible and there’s a definite A Clockwork Orange influence in the photography. There’s so much happening but it’s only 90 minutes long and it never feels rushed or over-plotted – every character gets a story that gets told in a really natural way.

 

A beautiful film. 

 

4.5/5

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Yes, I think there was a magic in British filmmaking around that time that has long been forgotten.

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New Laika film Missing Link 7/10

 

This was wonderful, like Hunt For The Wilderpeople in being something that you can't imagine anyone not enjoying. It's light hearted and kind of affable in contrast to the more portentous Kubo which i really didn't like. Still though, half way through i was thinking whether this story was compelling enough but then it became funnier and its charm was really winning me over. (i started to adore Link and there were some jokes that despite seeing them coming were executed with such perfect timing they gave me proper lols). And it kind of stays at the same level and doesn't escalate, if you think how the film begins with such epic visual ambition it maybe could have done more with how the journey progresses. But it retains its humour, it's so tightly put together, there are numerous blink and you miss them visual gags, it's gorgeous, and a few hours of it finishing i want to watch it all again. Probably my favourite film of the year so far.

 

When the credits rolled and all the famous actor names came up i couldn't match any to the characters, apart from Hugh Jackman. I had to go to imdb immediately because i didn't want to find out David Walliams played Link. The feel good vibes would have been ruined.

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On 03/07/2019 at 01:41, kerraig UK said:

Considering the amount of time The Beatles spent in India and the amount it infused their sound I'm gutted more wasn't made of the appropriation coming full circle. But then its Curtis. He's like Metallica, desperately trying to match his earlier genius with his later tone deaf nonsense. 

 

I know complaining about negs is a good way to get negged, but why did this get negged? Complaining about latter-day Richard Curtis being creatively bankrupt seems pretty standard. Also not sure why it would be controversial to complain that a screenwriter failed to make an obvious connection that would've tied their narrative in a nice little bow.

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On 02/04/2018 at 18:59, Goose said:

Yes! I remember Ford stapling his hat to his head as part of the trailer/making of/coming soon. 

 

I don't mind the opening, and admit that even at the time, the airship sequence didn't look great. I love the dynamic between Ford and Connery though, the Chateau break-in and escape, the finale. But by far the biggest gripe is Brody. He was cool as hell for the 8 or so minutes he appeared in the first movie, but they made him a fool in Last Crusade, and there was absolutely no need for it. 

 

I didn't quite enjoy it the first time I saw it, but have to come love it over the years. I saw it a few years ago, not long after my father had passed away, and it had quite a profound effect on me.

 

Haha - finally found it - 

 

https://imgur.com/gallery/bHfcyEZ

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M (1931)

 

This is a thriller about the manhunt for a child murderer in Berlin. When the number of child deaths start to rack up leaving the police no closer to the truth, the seedy underworld of organised crime begin to take matters into their own hands.

 

So I found this extremely good, but I did struggle with aspects of it and I imagine that's probably down to me judging some of it against modern standards. There's lots of quick switching from scene to scene in the first 30 minutes or so making it quite incoherent, especially with introductions to characters that make them feel very fleeting. There's one weird scene where a guy is reading the paper to his friends round a table and they all start arguing uncontrollably out of nowhere that made little sense at all. Theres no real sense of who they are and if they're important, it feels very random. In just under two hours it also felt like I didn't really get to know any of the characters at all either. The sound editing put me off at times too switching from being really loud to completely silent. But it was a film from 1931 so I can forgive it

 

I realise that all sounds very negative, however I did enjoy it. The 2nd half is definitely better than the 1st, things start to fall into place better, especially from the moment he's recognised. The final scenes are also an absolute acting masterclass from Peter Lorre. He has such great facial expressions. The camera work and directing is also really good with some wonderful shots and throughout. I also think that for someone to be making a film about mental health issues in 1931 is progressive as hell and should be applauded.

 

4/5

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17 hours ago, Stigweard said:

M (1931)

 

This is a thriller about the manhunt for a child murderer in Berlin. When the number of child deaths start to rack up leaving the police no closer to the truth, the seedy underworld of organised crime begin to take matters into their own hands.

 

So I found this extremely good, but I did struggle with aspects of it and I imagine that's probably down to me judging some of it against modern standards. There's lots of quick switching from scene to scene in the first 30 minutes or so making it quite incoherent, especially with introductions to characters that make them feel very fleeting. There's one weird scene where a guy is reading the paper to his friends round a table and they all start arguing uncontrollably out of nowhere that made little sense at all. Theres no real sense of who they are and if they're important, it feels very random. In just under two hours it also felt like I didn't really get to know any of the characters at all either. The sound editing put me off at times too switching from being really loud to completely silent. But it was a film from 1931 so I can forgive it

 

I realise that all sounds very negative, however I did enjoy it. The 2nd half is definitely better than the 1st, things start to fall into place better, especially from the moment he's recognised. The final scenes are also an absolute acting masterclass from Peter Lorre. He has such great facial expressions. The camera work and directing is also really good with some wonderful shots and throughout. I also think that for someone to be making a film about mental health issues in 1931 is progressive as hell and should be applauded.

 

4/5


Wow, M? That's really fucking going in dude. Respect. Films from before about 1942 do definitely creak a lot more. And M has some rough edges. But you lasered in on the best parts. How progressive it is, how good the second half is, and that knockout performance from Peter Lorre. 

 

If you're looking for early gems that really hold up check out The Long Night, Treasure of Sierra Madre, Ace in the Hole, The Third Man, Touch of Evil, A Matter of Life & Death, Double Indemnity and of course, my absolute all time favourite Sweet Smell of Success. 

 

Last night I watched Stallone's Cobra, which I actually found quite depressing. It's one of the most incomprehensible nonsensical disasters of all time. With no plot, characterisation or skill at all. Yet it was released in 1986, which many believe to be right at the height of the best era of cinema, was Warner Bros's biggest opener of all time, and grossed $160m worldwide. 

It's so obviously a scam from the offset. Shot super cheap, with horrible production, no script & no stars (other than Stallone, who the crew were not allowed to talk to). Made at the absolute height, or nadir of Hollywoods cocaine casting couch scumbagness. And it shows. Watching Cobra last night made me realise how thirty years later America ends up with Trump. The film makers should have been taken out the back of the lot and shot.

 

Check out the Pepsi and Coors subtle product placement in the first 30 seconds of the trailer.
 

 

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Midsommar (2019, Cinema)

 

When Dani Ardor (Florance Pugh) suffers a personal tragedy she decides to travel with her boyfriend, Christian (Jack Reynor) to visit a Swedish festival that only takes place every 90 years. When she arrives. A lot of fucking shit goes down.

 

Okay, let's get the comparisons out the way right from the off. Midsommar is very much like The Wicker Man and features very similar themes. Thankfully, this is no mere rip-off however and Ari Aster's follow-up to Hereditary is every bit as unsettling and character-driven as his debut (although it's not quite as good).

 

You can predict a lot of the shit that goes on in Midsommar, and not just because Aster delivers huge hints through the many runes and murals found throughout the movie. This sense of knowing works in Midsommar's favour however as you know that shit is going down, which leads to a great anticipation of dread that's difficult to shake.

 

Midsommar isn't a conventional horror movie although there are certain horrific elements in it. It's a bizarre anti-date movie that's as funny as it is sickening and is as much about the end of a relationship as it is about new beginnings. It's a weird film too as it has a string of one-not largely forgettable male actors, discussing things you don't really care about and adhering to strict cinema tropes.

 

Only Jack Reynor (looking like a budget Chris Pratt) leaves any lasting impression and many of them are so forgettable you won't care about their fates. It's good then that Pugh absolutely carries the movie, delivering an astounding performance of nervous energy and raging anguish that leaves her co-stars in the shade and mimics Toni Collette's excellent performance in Hereditary.

 

Midsommar certainly won't be for everyone and it's a lot more predictable compared to Aster's debut, but that doesn't make it any less compelling to watch.

4.5/5

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Ahhh, I remember Cobra having a very cool poster (and Ocean game tie-in?) but I never had chance to watch. It looks dreadful!

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1 hour ago, milko said:

Ahhh, I remember Cobra having a very cool poster (and Ocean game tie-in?) but I never had chance to watch. It looks dreadful!

 

I bought the Game! 

 

This is an ACTUAL scene from the film. Like seriously. The film feels like its haunted. It's clear that Hollywood at this time was this morally bankrupt brothel run by shysters and gangsters when you watch this film. It makes no sense whatsoever. It was made by Cannon, in partnership with Warner bros because they needed a big star. But it's not even a movie. I don't know what it is. 

I mean what even is this 50 seconds?
 

 

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