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kerraig UK

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39 minutes ago, Mawdlin said:

We're you live streaming your comments while watching? Must've been dull.

Sadly yes to both

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I see that Agnès Varda has died at the age of 90. It's nice to see that in the last few years she has finally been receiving the attention she rightly deserved throughout her long career. Given the longevity of her career, I would argue she might be the greatest director to appear during the French New Wave (even if she doesn't have the name recognition of someone like Godard). Her work was always distinctly hers and shot with great warmth, humanity and imagination. 

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Deadly Target (1994)

A Hong Kong cop will stop at nothing to extradite an ambitious young Chinese gangster who is trying to muscle in on the LA drugs trade. More 90s action from PM Entertainment although it has to be said this is a pretty weak one. Gary Daniels' HK cop is generally a pretty unlikeable character, a bit of a twat through most of the film, destroying cars and generally pissing off the police. Mind you, he does bring his kick-boxing skills to bear against a legion of baddies, albeit not quite up to Hong Kong standards. Plenty of action including a comedy car chase that felt misplaced. And it has that PM look with night-time locations looking particularly lush, great photography. Has everything you'd expect but it's all a little underwhelming, sadly.

 

Cube 2: Hypercube (2002)

Another group of strangers find themselves trapped within a network of cube-shaped rooms, trying to find a way out. Whilst the first one was borne on an intriguing premise and had a well-crafted mystery with a bit of gore, this sequel definitely doesn't work nearly as well. It probably likes to think it's a lo cleverer than it actually is, with allusions to multi-dimentional space and quantum physics, but it soon gets messy and makes less and less sense until it reaches an opaque ending.

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Footloose (1984)

 

Curious how time plays tricks. I saw this in the cinema, missus is into dance movies so wanted to try it. Turns out I remember almost nothing about it, as it’s really quite an impressive little drama with annoying Kevin Bacon and some 80s montages stuck in, almost like it was done in production and some coked-up suit thought “know what this lacks?”

 

Lori Singer, Dianne Wiest and John Lithgow are the heart of the piece, with the former going full on Laura Palmer within the stifling little Colorado town where her brother’s death five years ago lead preacher father and the town elders to ban music, dancing, drink and basically fun.

 

The three are really good but Lithgow gets special mention, there are scenes aplenty that inspired Ned and Maud Flanders, Rev Lovejoy and the rest, but his performance as the troubled minister is really well rounded and anything but a caricature.

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Disaster At Silo 7 (1988)

A fuel leak at a nuclear missile base causes panic in the local area.  1988 TV movie based on the real life Titan II missile disaster in 1980 where a leak of fuel vapour in an ICBM silo threatened to set a nuke off. I've previously read the superb Command And Control by Eric Schlosser that gives a full account of the actual event along with a history of poor stewardship of America's nuclear arsenal, so was aware of how this panned out. The writers condensed the story well and managed to incorporate some of the larger-than-life characters. Generally good performances especially from the sergeant in charge of the fuel crew (Michael O'Keefe). The script did have a rather heavy-handed religious overtone to it, with the church and faith being important, and it did rather take away from the gravity of the situation for me, making it a tad mawkish. If you don't know about the Titan II disaster this gives a good account of it, but read the book, it is superb. 

 

 

Rage (1995)

An innocent teacher ends up on the run after being caught up in experiments to create a clone army. After last night's lacklustre PM Entertainment effort, I thought I'd try another Gary Daniels flick, and let me tell you this is much more like it. There's a set piece escape from a lab early on that is just action, and normally I'd think the next half hour would be a bit dull - wrong. This is bonkers set-piece after bonkers set-piece, plenty of OTT action with just the right amount of comic relief and family-based sappiness. It's almost like the producers gleefully tried to cram even more daft action in, just when you thought it couldn't get any sillier it would (helicopter and skyscraper bit). All well shot and fluid. Gary Daniels doesn't get much of a chance to portray the character, his performance is about 85% action. If you fancy something genuinely exciting and silly you really need to see this.

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On 30/03/2019 at 21:57, linkster said:

Footloose (1984)

 

Curious how time plays tricks. I saw this in the cinema, missus is into dance movies so wanted to try it. Turns out I remember almost nothing about it, as it’s really quite an impressive little drama with annoying Kevin Bacon and some 80s montages stuck in, almost like it was done in production and some coked-up suit thought “know what this lacks?”

 

Lori Singer, Dianne Wiest and John Lithgow are the heart of the piece, with the former going full on Laura Palmer within the stifling little Colorado town where her brother’s death five years ago lead preacher father and the town elders to ban music, dancing, drink and basically fun.

 

The three are really good but Lithgow gets special mention, there are scenes aplenty that inspired Ned and Maud Flanders, Rev Lovejoy and the rest, but his performance as the troubled minister is really well rounded and anything but a caricature.

 

Have you watched Raising Cain and World According to Garp? John Lithgow really is one of our greats.

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8 hours ago, kerraig UK said:

 

Have you watched Raising Cain and World According to Garp? John Lithgow really is one of our greats.

Did you see the Netflix drama The Crown with him as Churchill?

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Lithgow rules in everything. Especially that Stallone mountain flick.

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2 minutes ago, ZOK said:

Lithgow rules in everything. Especially that Stallone mountain flick.

Cliffhanger? I remember loving that in cinema but don't even remember him being in it ...

 

Wonderful in Planet of the Apes

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cliffhanger-lg.jpg

 

Speaking of Lithgow, I once woke up on the sofa and there was a film with him in, it was some weird thing where he got mugged or something but then he was the villain, and he might have been a psychiatrist or doctor or something, but it was like he was the goodie but then the baddie. 

 

I was half asleep so my recollections are dim, anyone gaveva clue what film it might have been?

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8 minutes ago, ZOK said:

cliffhanger-lg.jpg

 

Speaking of Lithgow, I once woke up on the sofa and there was a film with him in, it was some weird thing where he got mugged or something but then he was the villain, and he might have been a psychiatrist or doctor or something, but it was like he was the goodie but then the baddie. 

 

I was half asleep so my recollections are dim, anyone gaveva clue what film it might have been?

 

raising cain

 

Spoiler

Carter himself suffers from multiple personality disorder.

 

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On 30/03/2019 at 21:57, linkster said:

Footloose (1984)

 

Curious how time plays tricks. I saw this in the cinema, missus is into dance movies so wanted to try it. Turns out I remember almost nothing about it, as it’s really quite an impressive little drama with annoying Kevin Bacon and some 80s montages stuck in, almost like it was done in production and some coked-up suit thought “know what this lacks?”

 

Lori Singer, Dianne Wiest and John Lithgow are the heart of the piece, with the former going full on Laura Palmer within the stifling little Colorado town where her brother’s death five years ago lead preacher father and the town elders to ban music, dancing, drink and basically fun.

 

The three are really good but Lithgow gets special mention, there are scenes aplenty that inspired Ned and Maud Flanders, Rev Lovejoy and the rest, but his performance as the troubled minister is really well rounded and anything but a caricature.

 

Yeah I think it's those montages that give it that camp 80s reputation but it's not a bad movie at all.

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1 hour ago, El Geet said:

 

Yeah I think it's those montages that give it that camp 80s reputation but it's not a bad movie at all.

And Bacon. He's really quite out of place with the rest of it.

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Lords of Chaos
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4669296/
A teenager's quest to launch Norwegian Black Metal in Oslo in the early 1990s results in a very violent outcome.

 

Back in the late 80's/early 90's a group of Norwegian teenagers start a Black Metal group to express the true 'soul' of Norway. For them Norway's soul is pagan and nationalist. Unsurprisingly this leads to violence.


This is a true story that tells the story of the Norwegian Black Metal scene of the early 90's; the bands, the music, the people, the crimes and the fallout from the whole thing. Rory Culkin plays one of the main players - he ran a record shop that was the focus for the whole movement and recruited a guy who would turn out to be a complete psycho and murderer. 


I thought this was very impressive. The acting is excellent, especially from Culkin. It looks amazing with some great outdoor photography - the church burning sequences are particularly good. It's quite a slow burner but once the violence starts it really grabs you. There's a murder scene that was almost unwatchable it was so brutal. I've watched a lot of horror films over the years but I think it was because this scene was so realistic and because it took the victim so long to die it was very tough to watch. 


I would be surprised if this found an audience but I'm glad I made the effort to see it. One of my favorites of the year so far but you'll need a strong stomach for some of it.

 

4/5

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46 minutes ago, Goose said:

Lithgow is excellently over the top in Ricochet.

 

Is there something he's in where he's subtle? 

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7 minutes ago, AK Bell said:

 

Is there something he's in where he's subtle? 

Most of Footloose is like this. To my surprise. When we had that other thread lately, Scary Side Characters, I put Lithgow as one of my first choices cos I saw it quite young and he had that effect, but actually he only does the fire and brimstone stuff once. The scene where he finds Lori Singer partying at the drive thru and gives her some money is just wonderful and really understated, can see his confusion and turmoil and you expect a flipout but he does the opposite

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6 minutes ago, Silent Runner said:

 

Love is Strange?

 

He still seems the more outgoing one of the couple (can only tell from trailers, not seen it yet)

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1 hour ago, AK Bell said:

 

Is there something he's in where he's subtle? 

The Manhattan Project

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Skate Kitchen

 

Docudrama - they found a bunch of real NY skaters and made kind of a coming of age drama. I really liked this. It follows a basic structure but pays lip service to all of it (the ‘climax’ delivered by text made me smile). It knows its strength is the natural (cos they aren’t actors) performances, the camaraderie, the inane barely scripted dialogue (actually a compliment cos nothing contrived about it), the charisma, the skating, the lighting and the city. Comparisons are hard - Lost in Translation maybe comes closest but only very loosely. It’s like when I used to stick Test Drive Unlimited in the 360 and just cruise admiring everything, no rush, no pressure. Really good.

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Riot (1996)

An SAS major is sent into a riot zone to rescue the kidnapped daughter of the British ambassador. PM Entertainment goes "urban". You're not watching this for plot or character development, or indeed any broad-range acting, this is action, and you get plenty of it in this on-street story that at times feels like Walter Hill's classic The Warriors mixed with Judgement Night. Whilst Gary Daniels' acting ability isn't exactly stellar he looks the part and kicks arse, a believable if C-class action star. Boxer Sugar Ray Leonard doesn't disgrace himself either, with a memorable bar fight at the start of the film. This is later-era PM and by this point they had the formula down, although it has got to the point where if you've seen a few you know what you're getting. Mind you, it's not short of spectacle and laugh-out-loud silliness. I mean you get a man on fire riding a motorbike, what's not to like? Clumsy Brits-vs-IRA motivation - "we're not in Dublin now!". Not the best PM Entertainment flick I've seen, you'd have to go some way to beat Rage, but solid entertainment.

 

And you that sold you....

 

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Cecil B Demented

 

First time I've watched this in 10 years. Watch this for the myriad of quotable lines ("Tell me about Mel Gibson's goddam cock and balls"; "I'm ashamed of my heterosexuality"), the sets which are Wes Anderson before he started making ambitious cutaways or the soundtrack.

 

It's a goddam masterpiece unless you hate John Waters.

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I rented Sicario 2: Soldado, it was way down my Cinema Paradiso list but I guess nothing else was available

 

TBH I couldn't even finish it. I wasn't really a fan of the first one, it was like Clear and Present Danger with all the fun sucked out of it, this even more so - scene after scene after scene lifted straight from a much better film

 

Initially it made me think of the kind of shit Chuck Norris did in the 80s, I couldn't really tell what the politics were supposed to be, but then later on there was a bit of a rant about the president so who knows

 

What it reinforced with the music was that you could run that same ridiculously melodramatic plunging bass note that so bored me in the first one over an episode of Sooty and it'd take on a different feel. Doesn't mean it has substance or anything to say.

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