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The Apartment (1960)

 

"Oscar winning comedy from Billy Wilder". Contains spoilers - recommend you skip if you haven't seen it.

 

I've added the sub title above in quotes since it's what NowTV said, and hence having had a shit night's sleep it seemed like a good choice for a nice easy watch on a Sunday morning - after all, Some Like it Hot is a blast!

 

I found myself instead frequently open mouthed & mentally drained at the effort of keeping up with the insanely quick fire dialogue while processing and reprocessing what the story says about the time in which it was made - I honestly don't know how much of it was satire.

 

It is to comedy, frankly, what Slumdog Millionaire was to "feel good".

 

The story has Jack Lemmon as an ambitious drone in a massive insurance company, pre computerisation there are quite extraordinary shots of an endless office like some human hive - I remember hearing at one point how they achieved the effect with clever tricks of perspective & even children in suits for the furthest characters.

 

Lemmon, in what was clearly the closest inspiration for Old GIl (besides Glengarry Glen Ross), is a never-down put upon nobody, who works late at the office not through dedication but because he can't use his home, having been pressured by those slightly further up the greasy pole to let them use it for their quick flings.

 

I dunno if it was meant to be flat out laughs in 1960 - another first time classic made pre the "sexual revolution" - but the sexual politics are kind of staggering - women are shown to be plentiful, cheap, available & ripe for exploitation ("I just met a Marilyn Monroe lookalike - clear out for half an hour" is the subject of one drunken call late one evening to Lemmon from a superior).

 

Desperate to please, Lemmon takes all they have to throw, but is also on the make himself, his object of desire being Shirley Maclaine, who works the elevator. Another era, indeed. Nice guy Lemmon is still deeply creepy in his dogged pursuit, as is her Geisha girl like charm and acceptance this is what men do.

 

Ultlimately his brown nosing gets him the promotion he craves, only to find his new boss is actually the lover of his dream girl. 


Maclaine is quite outstanding in this role, never more so than her reaction when the slimy HR boss casually offers her $100 to "buy herself something nice with". This scene, and her expression, kind of made me feel like I'd been punched, like at the final scene from The Last of Us, just a totally unexpected emotional jolt. It gets much worse when we follow her movements through the now empty apartment leading to a shocking realisation that initally put me in mind of a similar sequence from Trading Places but much, much more gut wrenching.

 

The movie gets even harder from here, an almost unbearable level of tension as Lemmon, to constant mouth-opening effect, shows compassion for the poor wretch and saves her life but tortuously then attempts to juggle his ongoing desire to please his boss by flat out lying to Maclaine about how the bastard really feels about her.

 

Ultimately, there is redemption, but I was unconvinced. It came too late, too suddenly, and I felt robbed.

 

I knew this was considered a classic but I really wasn't prepared for how it would affect me.

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44 minutes ago, linkster said:

The Apartment (1960)

 

"Oscar winning comedy from Billy Wilder". Contains spoilers - recommend you skip if you haven't seen it.

 

I've added the sub title above in quotes since it's what NowTV said, and hence having had a shit night's sleep it seemed like a good choice for a nice easy watch on a Sunday morning - after all, Some Like it Hot is a blast!

 

I found myself instead frequently open mouthed & mentally drained at the effort of keeping up with the insanely quick fire dialogue while processing and reprocessing what the story says about the time in which it was made - I honestly don't know how much of it was satire.

 

It is to comedy, frankly, what Slumdog Millionaire was to "feel good".

 

The story has Jack Lemmon as an ambitious drone in a massive insurance company, pre computerisation there are quite extraordinary shots of an endless office like some human hive - I remember hearing at one point how they achieved the effect with clever tricks of perspective & even children in suits for the furthest characters.

 

Lemmon, in what was clearly the closest inspiration for Old GIl (besides Glengarry Glen Ross), is a never-down put upon nobody, who works late at the office not through dedication but because he can't use his home, having been pressured by those slightly further up the greasy pole to let them use it for their quick flings.

 

I dunno if it was meant to be flat out laughs in 1960 - another first time classic made pre the "sexual revolution" - but the sexual politics are kind of staggering - women are shown to be plentiful, cheap, available & ripe for exploitation ("I just met a Marilyn Monroe lookalike - clear out for half an hour" is the subject of one drunken call late one evening to Lemmon from a superior).

 

Desperate to please, Lemmon takes all they have to throw, but is also on the make himself, his object of desire being Shirley Maclaine, who works the elevator. Another era, indeed. Nice guy Lemmon is still deeply creepy in his dogged pursuit, as is her Geisha girl like charm and acceptance this is what men do.

 

Ultlimately his brown nosing gets him the promotion he craves, only to find his new boss is actually the lover of his dream girl. 


Maclaine is quite outstanding in this role, never more so than her reaction when the slimy HR boss casually offers her $100 to "buy herself something nice with". This scene, and her expression, kind of made me feel like I'd been punched, like at the final scene from The Last of Us, just a totally unexpected emotional jolt. It gets much worse when we follow her movements through the now empty apartment leading to a shocking realisation that initally put me in mind of a similar sequence from Trading Places but much, much more gut wrenching.

 

The movie gets even harder from here, an almost unbearable level of tension as Lemmon, to constant mouth-opening effect, shows compassion for the poor wretch and saves her life but tortuously then attempts to juggle his ongoing desire to please his boss by flat out lying to Maclaine about how the bastard really feels about her.

 

Ultimately, there is redemption, but I was unconvinced. It came too late, too suddenly, and I felt robbed.

 

I knew this was considered a classic but I really wasn't prepared for how it would affect me.

 

Great review. I think for a comedy it definitely has a silent scream about it and I could believe that Wilder took it on because he wanted to shine a light on the sexual politics of the time. 

 

Now that we're all starting to genuinely wake up for the first time ever, it's pretty incredible to look back and see just how horrific we've all been to each other until extremely recently. 

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Browsing pointlessly and ended up on the E4 app, nice to stumble across the old biopic of Pete and Dud -  Not Only, But Always. If nothing more than as a nice whirl through some of their best material 

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In The Line Of Duty 1: Royal Warriors (1986)

When a Hong Kong cop, an Air Marshall and a Japanese detective foil an attempt to free a suspect destined for extradition, they become the targets of revenge. Hong Kong action isn't my strong suit, I can't call upon a lot of knowledge and insight, but what I can say is this film is largely superb. An early outing for Michelle Yeoh who knocks it out of the park, or kicks it anyway. Plenty of creative, intricate action with a mix of martial arts, gun fights and car chases. The film is let down somewhat by some poor writing, especially the comic relief Air Marshall Michael Wong, but the sheer amount and quality of the action keeps the film going. I hope the other films in this series deliver as much as this does.

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Firestorm (1998)

When a forest fire is set to help a prison break, a seasoned fire-fighter has to get himself and an ornithologist to safety. In some ways this does for fire what Hard Rain did for floods: a good guy is up against a bad guy and crew with the backdrop of a natural disaster. Yet Firestorm loses out due to a pretty straight-forward plot that lacks some of the cat-and-mouse. That's not to say this is dull, far from it. William Forsyth plays up to the full-on psycho he's best known for, utterly ruthless and devious. It was always a joy to see just how nasty he could get. Meanwhile Howie Long and Suzi Amis, whose bird-watcher character just so happened to be trained in marine survival skills, make a good, if rather bland, team. All this with fires raging around them, well-shot especially through smoke. Mind you, the camera did a bit too much zooming in and whizzing about. Ultimately it just felt a bit bland, the heart-rending music, the bants between the other fire-fighters, the occasional sentimentality, they rob this of any bite and make it an enjoyable, if sadly middling watch.

 

 

 

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On 25/02/2019 at 21:44, VN1X said:

I Kill Giants (2017)

 

Felt like one of the Red Letter Media movies they watch on Best of the Worst. Competently made but rather clumsy and dishonest. 

 

45/100

 

It's a shame the films crap as the comic it's based on is incredible.

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Fighting with my Family

 

Based on true story of Norwich teenager's rise to fame on the WWE circuit. Contains spoilers

 

There's something beautifully ironic about the most enjoyable underdog tale since Warrior having its credibility enabled entirely by the knowledge the medium of choice is known to be utterly rigged.

 

I am not a wrestling fan, precisely because of that 'theatre', but on the two occasions I've watched it in movie form now, it's been a wonderfully engaging subject. This is something else though - a British kitchen sink drama with grounded, relatable but morally highly dubious characters effortlessly blending with a glossy US brand and A list stars.

 

I've not yet seen the C4 documentary on which it's based, about the Knights, a Norwich family of wrestlers - mum, dad and kids. They scrape a living in local halls putting on crazy fights to very small crowds. The mum used to be a homeless junkie. The dad has done eight years inside. One brother put a guy in a coma with a brick. But this isn't Shameless. They are not scroungers. They work really fucking hard, and they give a lot to the community. Kind of like The Wire,  it manages not to pander or to be judgmental about their past, or in one shocking scene, about the present when a violent fight breaks out.

 

When their big break comes, a trial for WWE on tour at the O2, there's triumph and heartbreak as goth-punk daughter Paige, alone from all, is picked, while talented coach brother Zak has his world shattered by being rejected. Paige then must go to Florida for intensive training & to see if she's got "it", up against stunning tanned brash & mouthy cheerleeders and models. Even in these scenes, Stephen Merchant's clever script fools us into treating characters as 2D stereotypes we've all seen before, only to confound expectations later.

 

The climax of the movie is no surprise to those who follow WWE, but for me as a viewer, it's really interesting how the admittedly clumsy script and direction are saved by the knowledge that this IS theatre. The outcome IS pre-destined. But the emotion, the drive, the character of the real person at the centre to make it happen is all too real, and so you happily go along with it. I can't think of anything quite like those moments. 

 

The switchbacks between council estate Norwich and sunny Florida feel like Local Hero - dizzying but very effective in underlining just how alien the experience is for a pasty faced teen among amazing bodies. I love that throughout this movie you've got a girl with so much heart, who puts herself through so much, making the mandatory training montages more than just a tick box. Somehow this movie turns all those tropes 90 degrees to make them part of why you root for Paige as a real person, rather than turn you off through the sheer by the numbers nature of underdog movie template.

 

I really loved this, the best movie of the year so far, and probably last year too. I'll be thinking about it for days.

 

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Dead In A Week Or Your Money Back (2018)

A depressed writer hires a hitman, who needs to keep his job, to kill him. If he's not dead in a week he'll get his money back. Someone at work was raving about this Brit comedy starring Tom Williamson, Christopher Eccelstone and a couple of younger actors who, knowing me, everyone knows from the telly except me. So I thought I'd give it a go. The premise is very similar to an old Ronnie Barker/David Jason one-off comedy drama called The Odd Job where Ronnie wants to end it all, employs a passing odd-job man to kill him when he least expects it, but changes his mind. This though expands upon that, making a lot more of Tom Williamson's near-retirement cack-handed hitman. It was funny in part, some decent lines and a generally feel-good, er, feel about it. But it felt a bit stretched out, parts seemed to go on too long, or were too verbose and went nowhere, it wasn't a particularly taut plot. Quality performances though, and a good idea in concept. Just didn't really hit the mark.

 

 

And yes, this was turned into a feature film starring Graham Chapman in the Ronnie Barker role, but retained David Jason as the odd-job man. Worth tracking down for curiosity's sake, but that was even less substantial than this film, a half hour stretched way beyond what it should have been.

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Cyborg Cop 3 (1995)

A TV news reporter is investigating the covert research of this company and there are these two other guys and... cyborgs. The first two Cyborg Cop films were, for low-budget straight-to-video action, genuinely enjoyable fare. Sadly the same can't be said of this utter mess of a film. Yes, it has all the requisite explosions, gun fights, cliches and caricatures, but the plot ... oh the plot. It felt like they filmed a first draft, it made no sense, even a light analysis of the plot leaves you baffled. The two buddy-cop leads are just awful, the film doesn't really go anywhere. Okay, so it's cheapo action but that's no excuse, other films do this so much better. It doesn't even have a cyborg cop in it!

 

 

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Serenity

 

Call me Pishmael

 

I was ready to go see this in the cinema until happened to notice it had a simultaneous release on Sky Movies and given it's already being talked about as one of the worst movies of the year I played it safe. Given most of you won't bother, I'll warn you now there are spoilers below.

 

Steven Knight is a very talented chap. There are common themes to his movies - damaged, reflective male protagonists, estranged children, the impact of war on the mental health of veterans.

 

Serenity continues very much in this vein but after the brilliance of Locke, not just a gimmick but a truly enthralling watch, and then the sombre but rewarding Hummingbird, he's taken a visual cue from Christopher Nolan while channeling Herman Melville for his main man.

 

Baker Dill isn't so much Captain Ahab, more of a mopey dick. He moons around a sun drenched island, running his charter boat for fat drunk tourists but then threatening them with a knife when his nemesis - an, er, tuna - comes along. Back on shore, he trades bargain basement philosophy with a willing 'squeeze', a thoughtful barman, and the local shopkeeper.

 

It's obvious early on the director wants the audience to know something isn't quite right. Dill talks like he's narrating his own life, in growls. The visuals are heavily storyboarded, could even have come straight from a comic book. The radio seems to talk directly to the central character. When estranged wife Anne Hathaway arrives, in a bar, it's pure noir, played so over the top I'm surprised As Time Goes By wasn't playing somewhere in the background.

 

So at this point our man is presented with a moral quandary - kill a brute, save his kid, earn $10m bucks. If only it were that easy.

 

In what seems like a reference directly to Interstellar, Matthew McConnaughey learns he can somehow talk directly to his abused savant son thousands of miles away. As the psychological narrative comes to the fore, there's shades of Inception, a dream within a dream.

 

While this movie is far more likely to be compared to The Happening than either of those, I kind of think it's unfair. I didn't mind this nearly as much as Nolan's movies. The undercurrent is hardly subtle, but it's not smug either.

 

And there's a reason for that. Because what this movie is closest to, ultimately, is The Lego Movie. We've got the world viewed through the twisted psyche of a kid trying to escape from reality, trying to bring his dead father back and projecting his own dreams and wishes onto him as an escape from the brutality of life. It might be too kind to say that explains the immaturity of the interactions we see between the characters, since they are not only the creations of a child, a socially impaired one, but inherit their script from him too.

 

It's not a good movie, but I can't bring myself to call it a bad one either. Like Shyamalan, I think the guy has too much craft to get something this 'wrong' if it wasn't what he wanted, whether others get it or not.

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The Boys In Blue (1982)

A small police station is threatened with closure unless they can justify their existence, just as some art thieves move into the area. I'll say this for certain, I'm no fan of Canon and Ball, could never see their appeal and never found them funny. So I was primarily watching this for science more than entertainment. And, as predicted, this was as unfunny and hackneyed as the duo themselves, a perfect vehicle, you could say. The pair play the only police in a small fishing port, hilariously called Little Bottom, who somehow stumble upon some art thieves smuggling stolen paintings out of the country on their patch. Hilarity would ensue if the script, direction and humour were any good. It was written and directed by Val Guest who was mainly known for TV work but also directed amongst other films Jigsaw (great) and the original Casino Royale (legendarily awful). Whilst it's not a bad as that it's certainly towards that end. Plenty of poor slapstick, sexist gags that even then were old-hat, and a plot that doesn't really merit analysis.  Eric Sykes, Roy Kineer and Jon Pertwee phone it in. I could be generous and call this a curiosity from a bygone age but no. Don't bother.

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1 hour ago, Vimster said:

The Boys In Blue (1982)

A small police station is threatened with closure unless they can justify their existence, just as some art thieves move into the area. I'll say this for certain, I'm no fan of Canon and Ball, could never see their appeal and never found them funny. So I was primarily watching this for science more than entertainment. And, as predicted, this was as unfunny and hackneyed as the duo themselves, a perfect vehicle, you could say. The pair play the only police in a small fishing port, hilariously called Little Bottom, who somehow stumble upon some art thieves smuggling stolen paintings out of the country on their patch. Hilarity would ensue if the script, direction and humour were any good. It was written and directed by Val Guest who was mainly known for TV work but also directed amongst other films Jigsaw (great) and the original Casino Royale (legendarily awful). Whilst it's not a bad as that it's certainly towards that end. Plenty of poor slapstick, sexist gags that even then were old-hat, and a plot that doesn't really merit analysis.  Eric Sykes, Roy Kineer and Jon Pertwee phone it in. I could be generous and call this a curiosity from a bygone age but no. Don't bother.


Where why and how did you see it?


This was the first film I ever saw at the cinema. I was 4 and remember thinking it was shit.

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7 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:


Where why and how did you see it?


This was the first film I ever saw at the cinema. I was 4 and remember thinking it was shit.

"We'd do anything for yoooou in the line of duuuuuty"

 

Just fuckin terrible

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5 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:


Where why and how did you see it?


This was the first film I ever saw at the cinema. I was 4 and remember thinking it was shit.

4 year-olds normally love absolutely everything so this really must be rubbish.

 

I acquired this with a load of other random films off an ex-colleague who is similarly into any old rubbish. I had wanted to experience this one for some time, knowing full well it would be underwhelming at best. Plus I love watching this sort of thing to see which other actors are involved, and wonder why they got involved.

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3 minutes ago, Vimster said:

4 year-olds normally love absolutely everything so this really must be rubbish.

 

I acquired this with a load of other random films off an ex-colleague who is similarly into any old rubbish. I had wanted to experience this one for some time, knowing full well it would be underwhelming at best. Plus I love watching this sort of thing to see which other actors are involved, and wonder why they got involved.

 

Have you seen Party Party? That is basically your dream film

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7 minutes ago, Vimster said:

4 year-olds normally love absolutely everything so this really must be rubbish.

 

I acquired this with a load of other random films off an ex-colleague who is similarly into any old rubbish. I had wanted to experience this one for some time, knowing full well it would be underwhelming at best. Plus I love watching this sort of thing to see which other actors are involved, and wonder why they got involved.

What do you class as ‘this sort of thing?’ any sitcom that had a movie? Yeah there’s are you being served and terry & June but there’s also steptoe x 2 and they are amazing 

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6 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:

 

Have you seen Party Party? That is basically your dream film

 

Clive Mantle is the best thing in that.

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1 minute ago, linkster said:

What do you class as ‘this sort of thing?’ any sitcom that had a movie? Yeah there’s are you being served and terry & June but there’s also steptoe x 2 and they are amazing 

Oh I'd agree they're not all awful, the Steptoe films are great, the Likely Lads film is properly good, if more of a drama than a comedy, and I have a soft spot for some of the Hammer-produced stuff like That's Your Funeral. But we all know film comedy is hard to do, and there are so many that fail despite having a load of well-known names involved.

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1 minute ago, Vimster said:

Oh I'd agree they're not all awful, the Steptoe films are great, the Likely Lads film is properly good, if more of a drama than a comedy, and I have a soft spot for some of the Hammer-produced stuff like That's Your Funeral. But we all know film comedy is hard to do, and there are so many that fail despite having a load of well-known names involved.

 

and absolutely nailed at the start of The League of Gentlemen's Apocalypse

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23 minutes ago, Vimster said:

Oh I'd agree they're not all awful, the Steptoe films are great, the Likely Lads film is properly good, if more of a drama than a comedy, and I have a soft spot for some of the Hammer-produced stuff like That's Your Funeral. But we all know film comedy is hard to do, and there are so many that fail despite having a load of well-known names involved.

The ‘Confessions of’ series with Robin Askwith ... much childish lols seeing the mum from the oxo ads take her tits out

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Party Party (1983)

It's New Years Eve and, unbeknown to his parents, Toby is throwing a party. Girls, lads, booze, what could go wrong? Here we have a good-natured light comedy about a group of normal young people having a mostly good time. There isn't really much of a plot other than will Terry (my favourite character, properly funny) actually pull. It's more about the humour coming from the various interactions as the party progresses. It's bawdy in a rather innocent way, but it doesn't feel watered-down somehow, the tone feels genuine. No boobs or drugs or much swearing beyond a well-placed "shit!" near the end. What I liked most was how normal it felt, relateable. I was a teenager in the 1980s and a lot of the fancying and snogging I could relate to. Decent performances from young actors who would go on to bigger things such as Karl Howman and Caroline Quentin. Was weird seeing Frank from Hellraiser as the one young off-duty copper. Everything is set to a fantastic soundtrack of pop and what they would have called 'alternative' music from the time. Definitely a forgotten gem, not entirely side-splitting but well-observed, will leave you with a smile on your face.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Vimster said:

Party Party (1983)

It's New Years Eve and, unbeknown to his parents, Toby is throwing a party. Girls, lads, booze, what could go wrong? Here we have a good-natured light comedy about a group of normal young people having a mostly good time. There isn't really much of a plot other than will Terry (my favourite character, properly funny) actually pull. It's more about the humour coming from the various interactions as the party progresses. It's bawdy in a rather innocent way, but it doesn't feel watered-down somehow, the tone feels genuine. No boobs or drugs or much swearing beyond a well-placed "shit!" near the end. What I liked most was how normal it felt, relateable. I was a teenager in the 1980s and a lot of the fancying and snogging I could relate to. Decent performances from young actors who would go on to bigger things such as Karl Howman and Caroline Quentin. Was weird seeing Frank from Hellraiser as the one young off-duty copper. Everything is set to a fantastic soundtrack of pop and what they would have called 'alternative' music from the time. Definitely a forgotten gem, not entirely side-splitting but well-observed, will leave you with a smile on your face.

 

 


Yay! Where did you find it?

While it's not side splitting at all, it does have some real corker lines and situations. 

"After a few more pints I could quite fancy you."

"Will you write my suicide note?" "What do you think this is, Butlins?"

"Top on, top off"

"I don't wanna jeopardise me marriage. Y'know. me meals"

"I don't mind none of your lip"

"A strong masculine image can be achieved with a few well chosen accessories. Layered hair, digital watch, lame socks"

 

And that soundtrack is absolutely to die for. 

 

Really glad you took it for what it is and enjoyed it.

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20 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:


Yay! Where did you find it?

While it's not side splitting at all, it does have some real corker lines and situations. 

"After a few more pints I could quite fancy you."

"Will you write my suicide note?" "What do you think this is, Butlins?"

"Top on, top off"

"I don't wanna jeopardise me marriage. Y'know. me meals"

"I don't mind none of your lip"

"A strong masculine image can be achieved with a few well chosen accessories. Layered hair, digital watch, lame socks"

 

And that soundtrack is absolutely to die for. 

 

Really glad you took it for what it is and enjoyed it.

I got it off Cinemageddon. You simply cannot find this anywhere.

 

"Top on, top off, top on, top off"

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21 minutes ago, Vimster said:

I got it off Cinemageddon. You simply cannot find this anywhere.

 

"Top on, top off, top on, top off"

 

I still have my VHS copy. It's one I was never gonna throw out.

 

I love when he's sat on the sofa trying to gear himself up to dance to gene genie and he finally gets the courage just as the song finishes. 

 

I also love how Johnny Reeves is so cool and actually follows through by letting Shell think he's a berk and go get laid by the guy who smells like horses. Total gaslighting!

 

"Where do you get those scars?", "fighting in France, good ain't they?" "yeah!", "Want one?"

 

I could quote the whole film. I like that it's really family friendly and innocent. Adds to its charm.

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13 minutes ago, kerraig UK said:

 

I still have my VHS copy. It's one I was never gonna throw out.

 

I love when he's sat on the sofa trying to gear himself up to dance to gene genie and he finally gets the courage just as the song finishes. 

 

I also love how Johnny Reeves is so cool and actually follows through by letting Shell think he's a berk and go get laid by the guy who smells like horses. Total gaslighting!

 

"Where do you get those scars?", "fighting in France, good ain't they?" "yeah!", "Want one?"

 

I could quote the whole film. I like that it's really family friendly and innocent. Adds to its charm.

There isn't an unlikeable character in it. And I liked the fact Clive Mantle's 'trouble' bad lad was basically just all front. It didn't turn unnecessarily nasty.  The family-friendliness of it surprised me at first. It made a refreshing change from the Porky's style teen comedies. The nearest you got was Caroline Quentin's character getting her top chopped down.

 

I'd say the only film that did teenagers fumbling towards young love better was the original This Is England, with the lead lad and the Toyah lookalike. But that was more a drama, I suppose.

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3 minutes ago, Vimster said:

There isn't an unlikeable character in it. And I liked the fact Clive Mantle's 'trouble' bad lad was basically just all front. It didn't turn unnecessarily nasty.  The family-friendliness of it surprised me at first. It made a refreshing change from the Porky's style teen comedies. The nearest you got was Caroline Quentin's character getting her top chopped down.

 

I'd say the only film that did teenagers fumbling towards young love better was the original This Is England, with the lead lad and the Toyah lookalike. But that was more a drama, I suppose.

 

When the cop is given the night off...

 

"New years eve, loads of parties, plenty of birds, plenty of booze. I could get PARALYTIC!"

 

:lol:

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Still to this day when I'm in the doghouse from a girlfriend for something I've said (which is often) I think of the Dad in the car..

 

"What do you think was doing, dancing around with a lampshade on your head?"

"It got a laugh"

"Nobody laughed"
"I laughed... Mrs Dorkins laughed"

"The less said about that bloody women the better!"

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