Jump to content
rllmuk
Goose

Pixar Announce Future Slate

Recommended Posts

Cars 5 lol

I'm the odd one out here but I didn't get on with the first one. It had a nice opening 30mins, showing super heroes stuck in real world with the likes of super heroes being sued was at the time quite interesting but it soon turned into a Saturday morning cartoon affair with no depth or emotion. Doesn't make it a bad film by any stretch but it just lacked that punch but then I find the same problem in a lot of Pixar films like Up, Wall-E etc where they touch on the idea of depth before it transforms into a saturday morning cartoon caper. Regardless, I can still appreciate all the work that goes into these films on some level and respect that they didn't cash in on this sequel earlier considering how popular it was.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you ask my 3 year old son, cars & cars 2 are the best films ever, so in that respect the target audience is happy. They may not have the deepest message but they are perfectly watchable films.

Thats great but everything Pixar made up to that point kept all audiences happy. So the fact they now make films that kids like is a step down.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is Monsters Inc but by all accounts Monsters Uni isn't that great of a sequel (I've yet to see it). But hopefully any Incredibles sequel will go the way of Toy Story 2 and 3 and will be just as fantastic as the first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Brad Bird involved it has the best chance possible. Though I must confess I'd prefer a Bird helmed new film than another sequel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't believe it's ten years old.

Watch how totally masterful everything about this scene amazing is:

And this one:

So many scenes which genuinely put many live-action films to shame. It's got astonishingly good direction.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixar Website Updated with New 'Inside Out' Synopsis

"From the tepuis of South America to a monster-filled metropolis, Academy Award®-winning director Pete Docter has taken audiences to unique and imaginative places. In 2015, he will take us to the most extraordinary location of all – inside the mind of an 11-year-old named Riley.

Growing up can be a bumpy road, and it’s no exception for Riley, who is uprooted from her Midwest life when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions – Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). The emotions live in Headquarters, the control center inside Riley’s mind, where they help advise her through everyday life.

As Riley and her emotions struggle to adjust to a new life in San Francisco, turmoil ensues in Headquarters. Although Joy, Riley’s main and most important emotion, tries to keep things positive, the emotions conflict on how best to navigate a new city,

house and school."

Also worth noting: the page now refers to Lee Unkrich’s next project as Untitled Lee Unkrich Film. The studio had previously called it The Untitled Pixar Movie About Dia de los Muertos.

http://pixarplanet.com/blog/pixar-website-updated-with-new-inside-out-synopsis

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't believe it's ten years old.

Watch how totally masterful everything about this scene amazing is:

And this one:

So many scenes which genuinely put many live-action films to shame. It's got astonishingly good direction.

Brad Bird's first project was The Incredibles. Everything in this film was a nightmare for computer-generated animation - human characters, hair, fire, water and a massive number of sets. They told Brad it would take ten years and a mammoth budget to complete. Brad said, “Give us the black sheep. I want artists who are frustrated. I want the ones who have another way of doing things that nobody’s listening to. Give us all the guys who are probably headed out the door.”. Brad's 'black sheep' were the malcontents who had been given little opportunity to try new ideas, since the first three films were such blockbusters. In the end The Incredibles cost Pixar less per-minute than it's previous films while having three times the number of sets
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bo Peep was cut from the third movie for many reasons, although she makes a brief silent cameo in Toy Story 3 in the home videos Ms. Davis makes of Andy. Later on, Woody comments that some of the toys were either given away, sold in yard sales, thrown out, possibly broken, or donated. When Rex mentions her name, Woody reacts sadly, showing that he is still heartbroken over her loss.

Woody: "We've lost friends along the way... Wheezy... and Etch and..."
Rex: "Bo Peep?"
Woody: "...Yeah. Even - even Bo."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The animation blogger who did that really good post about Zootopia has written one comparing Monsters University and Finding Dory. Both were follow-ups that people questioned the need to be made, but he argues that Monsters University is the better film and deserves to be reassessed:
http://jehanimation.tumblr.com/post/149645792888/monsters-university-finding-dory

 

[Monsters University is] a fantastic working demonstration of what can be accomplished by stepping outside of a formulaic comfort zone to go for something a little more risky, and the relative conservatism of Finding Dory only accentuates that. Andrew Stanton made a technically marvellous film filled with charm, good humour and creative design, which sticks the landing on its big moments of emotional payoff - but it also never totally stops feeling like it exists purely as a reaction to the first movie rather than something that truly stands alone, and an elaboration on a theme that had already been articulated to everyone’s satisfaction. For sure, it’s a very smart answer to the question of how to make a sequel to Finding Nemo, but it never quite explains why the question needed to be asked in the first place.



 

A follow-up to Monsters Inc could have felt very much the same, but by going off-piste, Monsters University becomes something very uncommon: a franchise movie with a genuinely fresh identity and an opportunity to say something original and subversive. This is perhaps the single most significant area in which Monsters University exceeds Finding Dory: instead of seeming content to simply justify taking up the audience’s time, Scanlon’s film is driven by a real desire to give them something challenging to think about.  [...] As creative as the premise and world design of the 2001 film is, the plot can broadly be said to fit the basic Disney/Pixar template of a hero making a brave stand against a status quo and changing it through sheer force of will; Monsters University’s approach, which shows what happens when the irresistible force of an innocent dream meets the immovable object of reality, is much rarer, and it’s made all the more impactful by the way the film toys with the audience’s expectations of how these kinds of stories typically play out.

 

If there’s one single point that really illustrates the discrepancy between the two movies, though, it’s the way they handle their co-stars, Sulley and Marlin. Having taken the lead roles in Monsters Inc and Finding Nemo, respectively, both main heroes find themselves demoted to supporting roles for the sequels - but it’s only Monsters University that’s really able to make the character’s return feel necessary. Finding Dory’s inability to give Marlin (or Nemo, the former title character) anything to actually do this time around is one of its most serious problems, with Albert Brooks’ pessimistic clownfish ending up a reactive and fairly grating personality, hogging screentime while showing zero growth or having no impact on the heart of the story. This seems worse when compared and contrasted to Monsters University’s thoughtful reworking of Sulley as an integral support role, which actually stands out as one of the best examples I’ve seen of how to refresh a character by giving them a new context. His introductory scene - in which he swaggers late into a university lecture, radiating arrogance and entitlement, embodying everything we’re rooting for the diligent, humble Mike to fight against - is a moment of understated genius, temporarily turning the audience against an iconic, beloved character simply through intelligent use of theme, and making his subsequent transition from an antagonist into a cuddly best friend into a genuinely meaningful journey. This is the difference between the two movies in a nutshell: Finding Dory, for all its craftsmanship and moving interludes, opts for the perfunctory solution that apes its predecessor to lesser effect, whereas Monsters University takes its pre-existing components and tries to build something genuinely new out of them.

 

As a Pixar fan, though, I’ll be most curious to see what the studio learns from the varied reception its franchise movies have received so far. It’s widely known that they’re the kinds of filmmakers who do read and listen to reviews, so it won’t have gone unnoticed that their more iterative sequels (Toy Story 2 and 3, and now Finding Dory) - have been among their biggest critical and commercial successes, while the more transformative spinoffs - Cars 2 and Monsters University - have received more muted responses. You have to wonder how this discrepancy might influence their thinking as they approach the writing of Cars 3, Toy Story 4 and The Incredibles 2; indeed, it’s already been confirmed that Cars 3 will be a deliberate return to the earthy tone and themes of the first Cars, following the widespread pushback to the second movie’s genre switch. Naturally, I’m as receptive as anyone to the idea of a Cars sequel actually being tolerable, but at the same time I can’t help wonder if it’s simply an isolated case of sensible franchise course-correction, or a symptom of a wider move towards more conservative and less imaginative sequels. Of course, it’s too early to actually say whether that’s the case - certainly, the fact that Toy Story 4 is being pitched as a “romantic comedy” suggests the studio’s love of genre-hopping isn’t dead - but it would be massively disappointing if the relative underappreciation of Monsters University meant we never got another Pixar sequel like it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep seeing and clicking this thread wondering when the Pixar film, Future Slate, is going to finally be unveiled. Even when I knew the thread was about other Pixar films I forget and check. It will probably keep happenIng too.

 

Facepalm.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.