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Games Workshop, An Appreciation Thread


Lorfarius
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Why not try it. To be honest if you enjoy doing it and can cover the cost of your materials, it sounds like a perfect balance of enjoyment and not collecting a load of clutter. 
no clue how easy Etsy is to set up. I assume you have to pay tax on your earnings though whereas eBay is just the fees (although arguably I guess that should be declared, not sure how that works)

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On 21/01/2022 at 21:20, MattKB said:

Why not try it. To be honest if you enjoy doing it and can cover the cost of your materials, it sounds like a perfect balance of enjoyment and not collecting a load of clutter. 
no clue how easy Etsy is to set up. I assume you have to pay tax on your earnings though whereas eBay is just the fees (although arguably I guess that should be declared, not sure how that works)


Yeah, I think that’s basically a very low risk endeavour for me. I’m going to paint them anyway - finishing the models and the ensuing photography element is really the bit I enjoy the most. The hiding the figures away in boxes afterwards? Not so much. I’d rather people enjoyed them.

 

However, there have been developments! It looks like I might be about to secure my first commission! Guy who bought my Olynder (and who says he’s going to buy some more he’s watching), is after a Coven Throne and says he’d be happy to commission me.
 

499555BB-D8BC-4012-A930-B76D9A455506.thumb.jpeg.6e88054968fddd9bb5a1a3c5cc082848.jpeg
 

I have the bits for the Mortis Engine from Mortal Realms mag, but looks like the full set came with three options: Bloodseeker Palanquin, a Coven Throne or a Mortis Engine. It’s £37.50 from Wayland Games.


My initial thought is that I could source the model myself and paint it as efficiently as possible, and charge him £100-£150 to paint it at my own pace. Obviously this would be very cheap in terms of my time and materials, but it would give me a first commission on my CV, something I’d previously considered doing for free.

 

But I’m really just making this up as I go along. It’s a huge model with lots of elements (including three witches), so I need advice! Paging @feltmonkey, @JoeK, @Nicky @Cockyet al to the thread! 
 

 

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1 minute ago, feltmonkey said:

@Davros sock drawer I'm just impressed that you managed to ship Lady Olynder and it apparently arrived in one piece!  That's genuinely astonishing.


Ha! I fixed it to the floor of the box with magnets, with bubble wrap behind it and in front, put stickers on the box to show which way up it was, and sent the guy clear instructions to pull the first layer of bubble wrap clear, then slide the model out by the base. I wasn’t taking any chances! 

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It's hard to say. My initial reaction is that it's too much work for a one off and chances are this person has been turned down a few times already or is shopping round for the cheapest price. But I once took on a difficult job that didn't pay well and that client has at times kept me in business in the years since. Being self employed means taking chances when opportunities arise and being prepared to fail. I'm a lazy piece of shit that would rather work fewer hours than have more money in the bank but I recognize that the more opportunities you can create the more likely you'll be successful whatever that means.

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I think you’re right, but if I’m to get into this “properly” then this might be the difference between saying “I take commissions” and “here is a commission I did”. The folks seeing that don’t need to know I did for cheap.

 

I’d have been painting the Mortis Engine variant at some point anyway - the main difference here is that I’d need to actually source the model as well.

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Charging for your time is incredibly tricky, and I honestly don't think there are any easy answers to this. I never looked at what anyone else was making/charging and just decided to work out what I felt was fair for my time. 

 

What thankfully happened is I'm a fairly fast painter (who would probably be faster were I to ever break my pledge of never using an air-brush), worked out how fast I can paint different size things and work out an hourly average on that basis. 

 

It's worked out pretty well. There'll always be figures that break that rule and take longer, but there are plenty more that'll be much quicker to paint, so it all balances out pretty well. 

 

 

 

 

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My advice is this. Do you need the money? if you do, then do it. If you don't, pass. Why? you only have so much painting time in your hobby and you want to be painting for yourself. Painting for others, even if paid, can quite quickly drain the love out of what you currently cherish. So if you start doing lots of commissions or an army or whatever, you paint, you paint a lot, but have nothing but a pile of ever growing unpainted plastic at the end of the day which you're too tired to paint. I have a bunch of commissions on my desk to complete, and all i want to do, is build and paint some 1:24 car models at my own pace, for me, and i cant :(

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46 minutes ago, Nicky said:

My advice is this. Do you need the money? if you do, then do it. If you don't, pass. Why? you only have so much painting time in your hobby and you want to be painting for yourself. Painting for others, even if paid, can quite quickly drain the love out of what you currently cherish. So if you start doing lots of commissions or an army or whatever, you paint, you paint a lot, but have nothing but a pile of ever growing unpainted plastic at the end of the day which you're too tired to paint. I have a bunch of commissions on my desk to complete, and all i want to do, is build and paint some 1:24 car models at my own pace, for me, and i cant :(

 

Yeah there are a lot of unspoken side effects of being a commission painter and losing  the hobby is the big one It took me seven years before I could justify painting for myself again and it requires a certain mentality to do so, basically not caring too much about money. It also changes your relationship with the community as every time you post a photo, regardless of your intetion, you are advertising a business with all of the implications that brings. These days I only post on instagram, mainly for appearances sake and where my contribution is minor in comparison to the constant attention seeking of infouencer accounts, and on rllmuk where I've been on for long enough that I hope no one thinks I'm only here to sell them stuff. 

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41 minutes ago, Nicky said:

My advice is this. Do you need the money? if you do, then do it. If you don't, pass. Why? you only have so much painting time in your hobby and you want to be painting for yourself. Painting for others, even if paid, can quite quickly drain the love out of what you currently cherish. So if you start doing lots of commissions or an army or whatever, you paint, you paint a lot, but have nothing but a pile of ever growing unpainted plastic at the end of the day which you're too tired to paint. I have a bunch of commissions on my desk to complete, and all i want to do, is build and paint some 1:24 car models at my own pace, for me, and i cant :(

 

Ironically, I think it's the reason I'm trying to push myself to do a few more personal projects. I find my motivation tends to only hit what I've got a job with a deadline looking. In which case nothing tends to stop me from doing the thing! 

 

Getting paid has been a big motivator for my own painting journey, but I do think that it can come at the expense of experimentation. People tend to give you a job mainly because they like the way you paint (obviously, not being a dick and overcharging helps to a point but mostly people choose you because of your style I think), so you spend a long time refining a particular style and technique to get the most out of that. 

 

Now, I enjoy the way I paint, but it's always nice to veer off and do something a bit left-field (or is it right-field? I dunno, something to do with fields anyway). So, that's going to be interesting to see what happens. I think it can only help my painting in the long term too, so it's all good!

 

@Davros sock drawer I think you'll find out sooner or later whether or not it will be something you'll love doing more and more, or not. I know plenty of full time painters who've had the life sucked out of them, and have moved onto other jobs. But plenty who're still perfectly happy doing what they do. 

 

Only you can decide!

 

It's like a choose your own adventure tale, but with more paint and mould lines.

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Yeah, that job sounds a decent way to dip your toe into the water. To determine a price, considering realistically how many hours it will take, and pay yourself something like £10 per hour for it. Then bear in mind it will take longer than you thought it would because everything in life does.

 

If I were you I'd consider your reasons for going into commission painting @Davros sock drawer.  Do you need to, or are you doing it for the fame, kudos, and women?  Those things are all very well, but there are downsides, and it sounds as if you're doing well painting whatever you feel like and selling it on eBay.  I think you'd do well in commission painting because your stuff looks great, and you seem to have a solid, replicable, and efficient method.  This is more important than being able to paint the irises and pupils on every model (not that I think you couldn't do this!) Doing well in commission painting doesn't really compare financially to doing average in a proper job though.

 

Painting for the hobby, keeping your best work to display and selling other pieces for a bit of spare cash is a good way to do it in my opinion. If you paint commissions, you don't get to choose what you paint, what colours you paint them, and you might find you don't have time to paint your own stuff. For example, I've found myself energised with an urge to do a new army - I want to do an all dragons Age of Sigmar army. I don't know if I'll be able to though, because instead I have to paint 50 virtually identical Space Marines in a pretty generic paint scheme.

 

Still, at least I have the fame, kudos, and women.

 

 

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I don't know about anyone else, but I do think the reason I do what I do is because I kind of just like painting in and of itself. I don't game with figures, and I don't display anything I've painted. I have a fair amount of my own stuff in boxes, but that's mainly because they are/were for the range I produced. But aside from that I'm not entirely bothered about the figures, and would far prefer them to go to someone who appreciated them rather than gathering dust in my attic! I've never been especially precious about them at all! Painting is a thoroughly enjoyable way of spending some time, and I'm fortunate enough that when I do get moments of not being motivated, I can ease up on the thing, leave it for a little while and start up again as and when the mood takes me. 

 

Which is another reason why I'm glad I decided not to do it full time, as I would most likely be on the streets in a cardboard box were it the case!

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I guess the answer is to find what works for you. We all go into this for different reasons and have different motivations. For me it's all about having an easy life and learning a craft. I had a shitty start to this year by first injuring my back and then struggling with booster shot side effects and as a result I had to take two weeks off work. The important thing is that I could take the time off and didn't have to ask permission from a boss. Also all I could think about was how much I wanted to paint. In fact I took the opportunity  to consolidate my various ideas about color theory and visual perception and create from scratch my very own painting system. There's still some refinement to do on the practical side but so far it's making the whole process a lot easier and I'm painting better with less time and less effort.

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Thanks for all the comments guys.

 

@NickyI don’t need the money per se, but the extra cash from minis I painted solely for the pleasure of doing it felt welcome and like winning a small prize. And this model is something I’d always planned to paint and probably pop on eBay, so actually this is probably a bit of a no-brainer. As you say @feltmonkey, this is probably a good way to dip my toe in -  I know I can paint it to the required spec, to the customer’s liking, and I’ll get some cash (in this case, up front!)

 

As to where I go from here, I can see that there would be a huge difference between this and someone posting me a 60 mini army that I might not even especially like, which needs to be done to a specific scheme in a certain time. That might well kill any enthusiasm I had for the hobby. But I guess in theory I could simply turn such things down, and paint things that I feel wouldn’t be a total grind. I do have a day job, after all. 

 

Really appreciate all the advice guys. :)

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A guy on a local forum posted about a kings of war event he went to last weekend. 

Every January there's a massive gaming event in Canberra that hosts loads of different games (and until recently hosted the lrgest regular Infinity tournement in the world), but obviously the last two years haven't happened.

So the KoW players from eastern Australia organised one themselves and managed ot get 50 players together, whcih is not bad considering how things are down here at the moment. I never knew the KoW player base was so strong.

Anyway, long story short, I'm now eyeing the half painted dwarf KoW army i have from the first KS. Because of course I am. I can barely gather enough time to paint an 8 model Malifaux crew, but sure brain, make me think I can finish off another 60 dwarfs.

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3 minutes ago, MattKB said:

That photo box setup is doing an immense job too. I tried recreating it via your Instagram posts but nowhere close 

 

Thank you! Actually although I used my normal kitchen shelf in the first instance,  I then removed the background on these pix using an app. Just fancied a jet black background, and also wanted to show both front and back without having a photo for each.

 

What background are you using to take your pix, and are you using indirect sunlight?

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1 hour ago, Davros sock drawer said:

Finally finished Gaunt’s Ghosts:

 

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Oan Mkoll remains the standout sculpt for me, although I enjoyed the fancy bits of Gaunt’s uniform too.


these are great!

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I use a black piece of card against a wall on a cupboard. Then light behind it and the flash on my phone. It just all comes out a bit grey as the light reflects on the card. 
 

What app did you use?

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It’s called Picsart. I ended up paying for a year’s sub as I was being driven mad by free background removal apps that didn’t work.

 

I would really recommend never using flash on miniatures. Best light is a cloudy day near a window. Most phones let you tweak the exposure so it’s rarely too dark. In fact I usually have to turn the exposure down. 
 

My photo shelf is just a little bookcase in the kitchen, opposite the back doors.

 

EB375EB1-B6C2-4152-9705-0FBF8EE64A37.thumb.jpeg.d3c3853430d39ece88d5e45b7faefacc.jpeg

 

I usually rest the phone against the front edge of the shelf, and zoom if I have to. Exposure to about minus 0.7, let the phone focus itself. Afterwards crop, adjust shadows down, black level up, add vignette to taste, job done. 

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Or, optional background removal:

 

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Thanks for that @Davros sock drawer

 

I tried a free background remover just to see how it looks, and think I’ll try that going forward with a better app (as the free one only does low res) 

 

Do you use that same app to pull the images together (front and back) - and do you do it all on phone? 

06EAA3AE-3F7C-4C1F-A0A0-90635EB62301.jpeg

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I’ve gone ahead with the commission I was offered for £150. Although it’s a big model there are a lot of similar components which can be banged out quite quickly with washes and dry brushing, so I don’t think it’ll take that long. The details are quite fun to paint as well.

 

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Intestines for cushion stuffing :lol:

 

 

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