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Perfect Album Covers


ZOK
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They all look like those dodgy pictures bearded men do with spray cans on sheets of plastic at awful seaside resorts abroad.

I was reminded of the picture of the woman draped across the motorbike that's in the front room of Alan Partridge's demented fan.

Fair's fair, we should post some of our own to be ridiculed:

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Wire - Pink Flag

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The For Carnation - The For Carnation

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Fugazi - The Argument

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Big Black - Songs About Fucking (maybe NSFW)

Used up all the images now which is probably just as well as I was starting to get into that.. To be honest there are loads of covers that are quite awful when they're judged solely on the basis of the image but which complement the music so perfectly that it's hard to imagine anything else being there instead. It's probably for the best that Peter Saville never worked on an Iron Maiden cover.

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There's been some really tacky artwork posted here so far.

Calashnikov, in what way's the Madvilliany cover a 'homage', apart from acknowledging the Madonna album by using the same colour palette?

Anyway:

BeirutGulagOrkestar.jpg

Though this is an example of the artwork being chosen for the album as opposed to created directly for it.

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Calashnikov, in what way's the Madvilliany cover a 'homage', apart from acknowledging the Madonna album by using the same colour palette?

The same composition? Similar lighting? Surely it's plain to see? The designer Jank shot MF Doom to look like Madonna did up on her debut album. Here is the quote direct from the interview I mentioned:

Q: Can you name three record covers that you find beautiful and inspiring?

A: 1. Scholly D - Self titled EP. Circa 1986.

2. Madonna - First album. Madvillain ”Madvillainy” cover is a homage to Madonna's first albumcover.

3. All Boredoms covers (by Eye).

4. Pavement - Perfect sound forever

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Say the nu art critics of rllmuk, aye. I think that's why I dared be The Man On The Clapham Omnibus back there (I don't actually think that cover is rubbish at all, obviously).

Actually, that Ed Roth cover was commissioned specifically for the record and is a perfect fit for the comic-book American white trash violence of the album, especially since - like Cave's compositions - it doesn't take itself too seriously.

Unlike some, it has to be said.

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It depends which way you're looking at it as I was saying above, whether you're judging them on their own merits or for how well they complement the music. The trouble being that a lot of the time someone's going to post something for the whole package but most of the people responding can only judge it on the picture in front of them so the thread's inevitably going to be an endless parade of people saying 'That's shit' or words to that effect. I love the original Appetite For Destruction artwork but taken out of context it's fucking horrific.

Anyway, I can see your argument for the Junkyard cover but I think they would've been far better going with something else, the fact that it sticks out like a sore thumb amongst all the cover art from Nick Cave's long career probably tells its own story.

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It depends which way you're looking at it as I was saying above, whether you're judging them on their own merits or for how well they complement the music. The trouble being that a lot of the time someone's going to post something for the whole package but most of the people responding can only judge it on the picture in front of them so the thread's inevitably going to be an endless parade of people saying 'That's shit' or words to that effect. I love the original Appetite For Destruction artwork but taken out of context it's fucking horrific.

Anyway, I can see your argument for the Junkyard cover but I think they would've been far better going with something else, the fact that it sticks out like a sore thumb amongst all the cover art from Nick Cave's long career probably tells its own story.

Meh, you have to take them all in context - the OP certainly did. Or are you seriously saying that if you'd seen that photograph of a pink flag without it being attached to that album you'd proclaim it a perfect work of art?

As to the Birthday Party thing, their covers were all pretty varied. And you have to bear in mind there was no 'long career' or story for Nick Cave then - that was their second UK album (the cover of the first was pretty forgettable). When you come to this stuff for the first time through the filter of history, from another era, I think you lose something. Certainly when my best mate and I saw that cover for the first time when the album went on sale we thought it was great - it seemed to capture the band's trashy aesthetic at that time quite well. It was funny, too. I still think it's the perfect Birthday Party cover, meself.

Anyway, this is another cover that would obviously be tacky/meaningless were it not actually an album cover, but which seemed at the time fresh, exciting, and a perfect fit for the album, so I'm going to have a second go at this:

bollocks.jpg

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Meh, you have to take them all in context - the OP certainly did. Or are you seriously saying that if you'd seen that photograph of a pink flag without it being attached to that album you'd proclaim it a perfect work of art?

Of course not, I just posted some covers that I like for whatever reason and I was fully prepared to get ridiculed for them the same way others had been. And I don't think you can put them in context, that's the point I was trying to make - if you've not heard the album or don't know the band how can you? You've got nothing but the image in front of you.

I think you're the one taking other people too seriously here, to be honest. No-one's slagged anything off out of spite, at least I'd like to think not.

As to the Birthday Party thing, their covers were all pretty varied. And you have to bear in mind there was no 'long career' or story for Nick Cave then - that was their second UK album (the cover of the first was pretty forgettable). When you come to this stuff for the first time through the filter of history, from another era, I think you lose something. Certainly when my best mate and I saw that cover for the first time when the album went on sale we thought it was great - it seemed to capture the band's trashy aesthetic at that time quite well. It was funny, too. I still think it's the perfect Birthday Party cover, meself.

Fair enough. I take your point about coming to things in different eras, there's probably quite a lot in that. What I meant about his long career was that there's never been a hint of repeating that same kind of cover, which to me suggests that he/they didn't find it all that successful in hindsight but that could easily be total bollocks.

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The same composition? Similar lighting? Surely it's plain to see? The designer Jank shot MF Doom to look like Madonna did up on her debut album. Here is the quote direct from the interview I mentioned:

I'm thinking more of the 'why?' as opposed to the 'what?' The similarities are easy to see when you place the two covers side by side. But what's the ultimate intention or effect of the Madonna reference, and what makes it a 'homage'?

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