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2000AD & The Meg


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23 hours ago, Don Rosco said:

 

 

Just read the rest of this interview. What a pair of titanic assholes, Jesus! I much prefer the older, mellower Grant Morrison. Been a while but I remember really enjoying this interview with Kevin smith, here's a YouTube link but it's still available in your podcast doofer of choice, episodes 26 & 27:

 

 

Um isn’t that entire interview nothing but a complete pisstake and both of them acting up to what the comics industry and media of the 90’s made them out to be? 

 

Though I think Millar has always been a bit more seriously up his arse and edgelord for his own good. 

 

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2 hours ago, Don Rosco said:

Ah they're playing up to it alright, but they definitely mean a lot of what they're saying there. Just young lads, full of attitude. Part of the package I suppose.

Yeah I hadn’t read it all when I posted but I agree. 

 

 

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Morrison has conceded that his upstart phase wasn't his greatest idea a number of times now, but in the context of the times it made some sense - when it first kicked off, he and all other British creators were firmly in the shadow of Alan Moore, so going against that orthodoxy was a legitimate tactic, a way of breaking free of the restrictions it imposed. Unfortunately in Moore's case it seems to have resulted in permanent exile, but it was always obviously tongue-in-cheek (and occasionally on point, e.g. comparing the purple prose of Moore's greatest excesses to Pink Floyd - which Morrison deflated by comparing himself to Freddie and the Dreamers).

 

The Summer Offensive stuff came a little later, but I think it was in the same spirit. Mills discusses it in his book, and it's an interesting section. On the face of it, you might think that Morrison and Millar (who I've never had any time for myself) were attempting to reignite the punk spark of 2000AD when it first appeared. But Mills says - and he makes a good argument - that they weren't sticking it to the 'old guard'; they were sticking it to the readers.

 

I still enjoy that interview, though - it was unlike anything else going on at the time (there was still a lot of earnest chin-stroking taking place), and the bits about John Smith and Mystery, Inc. still make me laugh.

 

I recommend Morrison's Supergods for his thoughts on the Alan Moore excommunication - it's a real shame, because Morrison has repeatedly shown a great fondness for Moore's work. He may have taken some light-hearted pot-shots at Watchmen at the time - when it was essentially the White Album of comics - but his Pax Americana in Multiversity is as earnest and considered a tribute as I've seen.

 

Anyhoo, I finished the Mills book and enjoyed it throughout. I did perhaps start to flag a little when he got to the whole Flynn saga, but even that was enlivened by his theories about literal witch-hunts at Tharg Towers. Throughout the book, Mills is always on the side of the creator and, more importantly, I think, the reader. I'm not convinced he could have pulled off all the achievements he claims he was denied, but it's a must-read for anyone who's ever experienced any degree of thrill power.

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I thought he was a touch disingenuous towards Rebellion buying the mag. They pretty much save the whole ship from going down and all Mills can do is complain they're too hands off and don't pay enough to the creators, having complained that the previous owners wouldn't stop meddling and interfering with his baby ... or paying enough to the creators.

And given that the last couple of issue have been chock full of Mills stories I think he might just have an agenda there.

 

Its a good read sure, but its certainly the Mills alone show,

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14 minutes ago, Darwock said:

Who's going to draw Strontium Dog now? Will they retire it? I don't think anyone else has ever drawn that strip, have they?

 

Well there was that terrible "Feral" period in the late 80s where it was drawn by someone else but it was, well, terrible. There have probably been a few others over the years too. But you're right, it wouldn't be the same without him (and it wasn't when they tried it before).

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16 hours ago, Darren said:

 

Well there was that terrible "Feral" period in the late 80s where it was drawn by someone else but it was, well, terrible. There have probably been a few others over the years too. But you're right, it wouldn't be the same without him (and it wasn't when they tried it before).

 

Didn't John Hicklenton draw it once or twice? I couldn't stand his art style in Nemesis, but he was obviously very talented. It was too jarring a departure for me to handle back then. He needed to build up his own series and make it his own.

 

John also no longer with us. :(

 

 

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Probably, but I don't think it was him that did the Feral stuff, although it was a similar black and white style.

 

Wikipedia isn't very helpful on this, although from looking it up I learned that Carlos objected to Wagner killing off Johnny Alpha and refused to draw it! A man of principle as well as talent.

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Gutted. Absolute legend in comic art. 

 

Especially upset as at the end of last year I'd started up a dialogue to do some concept art with him! Alas, timing in both our schedules didn't quite add up, so it's one of those big regrets I'll have :( . 

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He was an artist that drew a story, not the sort of artist that wanted to show off how big the girls tits are or show off his painting style. I always felt he was drawing for the reader, not as a calling card to America and the Marvel and DC money men. 

 

RIP :(

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Not so excellent news. Ron Smith RIP. He's the Dredd artist I remember most from my youth. He drew a great Dredd but the cits were where he really shone. 

 

noses.jpg

 

For me he was as definitive as Ezquerra, Bolland, McMahon and Cam Kennedy. Man, what a lineup of artists. 

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Oh no, Ron Smith was great. He really shone in that early golden age of Dredd between the Cal and Judge Child epics, where the focus was more on the city and all the weirdos in it, most of which I’m sure he drew. Otto Sump, the Blobs, Uncle Ump, I think Mayor Dave was around then too.

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