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Album art is dead...


LittleJoe
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Richard told The Times: "The significance of album covers is becoming little more than a centimetre square on an iPod screen. The sleeve used to add another dimension to an album, but that seems to be disappearing, which is really sad ... We had the Sleeve of the Year in 2005 and we looked at every way of trying to top it. But perhaps the best way is to kill off the sleeve altogether."

Riiiigghttt.

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Well, I agree. I remember spending a long time looking at album covers and booklets, especially the Ok Computer one. I even looked up information about the typography on the Internet, stuff like how the lyrics to 'Lucky' where in the shape of a man, or something. I don't really remember.

I don't do anything like that anymore.

Whilst its not as important as a 'art cover', surely its still quite important to have a distinctive cover that’s going to make sure you know what album and what artist it is immediately from a commercial point of view?

Even that 'NO COVER ART' with Hard Fi on it is album art and its quite distinctive in its plainness this and the hype generated from it will help them. But if every artist did the same plain colour with black text cover as a representation of 'no cover art' then it would be impossible to tell albums apart at a glance, which is still important even in the digital music age. Your not glancing your eyes over a shelf but your still going to be glancing over web pages whilst your browsing online.

I still think cover art is very important and ironically this act proves it.

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IMO album art is still important, just less so. I'm only speaking from my own experience, but as I've gotten older and less of a collector/obsessive, my buying habits have shifted towards single tracks rather than albums, and of course covers don't tie into this. Pretty much all of my music is distributed digitally now, too. I doubt I'm the only person with which this is the case.

I like cover art though. It's a world away from film covers, with that horrible formula of having the actor's mugs staring out at you with their names printed above and some cheesy explosion of related elements behind them.

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I would argue the opposite, really.. I've had a few really nicely packaged and illustrated CDs/records recently, which I think will continue. If record companies want people to pay for the hard copy, they're going to have to give them reason to, and nice packaging does that.

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I would argue the opposite, really.. I've had a few really nicely packaged and illustrated CDs/records recently, which I think will continue. If record companies want people to pay for the hard copy, they're going to have to give them reason to, and nice packaging does that.

True. I actually whent out to buy Volta just to get the lovely cover art and assorted cards.

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Richard told The Times: "The significance of album covers is becoming little more than a centimetre square on an iPod screen.

Does he have a really small iPod or something?

/PEDANTIC :P

A good album cover always piques my interest.

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Perhaps album art doesn't matter as much to the big bands, who'll probably sell enough copies whatever the case, but for smaller acts, I think fancy packaging or nice artwork is becoming a way of ensuring at least a few sales of a release due to the desirabilty that comes with it.

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Perhaps album art doesn't matter as much to the big bands, who'll probably sell enough copies whatever the case, but for smaller acts, I think fancy packaging or nice artwork is becoming a way of ensuring at least a few sales of a release due to the desirabilty that comes with it.

Damn right. For some band like Hard-Fi album art is just another square as you walk along an aisle in Virgin, but alot of the indie stuff has great artwork and packaging. In some cases it's a work of art. Anyone who has bought a 7" single in the last 10 years or so will have encountered some great work. I've had 7"s come with earplugs, pizza leaflets, even have a Lemon Jelly one that comes in a sleeve made from a pair of jeans.

A Hard-Fi album cover made from banana skins probably wouldn't fit in well at Asda.

Album art will never die. It may get relegated to a jpg or even an embedded pic in a shitty iTunes file, but it'll always be there. They said the album sleeve had died when CDs came out.

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Who the fuck do Hard Fi think they are? I'll tell you what they are, really really really really really really really really fucking shit.

The most generic load of fucking wank you could hear, aimed at no brain robotic cunting rimjimmys.

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Who the fuck do Hard Fi think they are? I'll tell you what they are, really really really really really really really really fucking shit.

It goes towards my theory that 95% of records advertised on telly are shit and should be avoided.

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Who the fuck do Hard Fi think they are? I'll tell you what they are, really really really really really really really really fucking shit.

The most generic load of fucking wank you could hear, aimed at no brain robotic cunting rimjimmys.

:( too true!

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Trent Reznor said this when Year Teeth came out. Then by the time he got round to Year Zero he was making it as elaborate as possible and complaining that people downloading meant he'd been working hard for nothing.

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The record must be that bland that this is the only way for them to stand out, cause a stink by saying album art is dead, get a few quotes in the papers with the words "Hard-Fi, whose new album is out this Monday" next to it. It's frankly pathetic and as I said, it shows a lack of insight and knowledge of pop history. However the sort of people who buy Hard-Fi albums (usually people who buy 3 CDs a year) will swallow it and feel like they're part of some club. This is marketting as a science, folks.

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