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Castlevania: Symphony of the Night

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I'm all out of whack now the castles you know what. Had a good grasp before but now my head is spinning. Still glorious though and perfect for my Vita.

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21 minutes ago, amc said:

I'm all out of whack now the castles you know what. Had a good grasp before but now my head is spinning.

 

Appropriate avatar.

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4 hours ago, Nick R said:

Mark Brown's Boss Keys series reaches SOTN:

 

 

The uneveness is what I love about SotN. It's like it doesn't give a shit - just wander about and find stuff, or don't find stuff, whatever. Sometimes an apparently major path comes to a dead end with a crappy item, sometimes a fairly obscure hidden route leads to a major part of the game. Most games wouldn't get away with throwing out the rulebook, but somehow it does and is better for it. I think it will always fall down in an analysis like this, but it's what gives it that unique personality.

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As the game mentions: the castle itself is a creature of chaos. That's the Castlevania vibe that it still contains within. If it were to become more Metroid/Zelda, it would've never worked because there aren't any mechanics to uphold such a density. This is way more RPG-influenced and thus fits the laid back design far better. The challenge comes from the enemies themselves not necessarily the game's world: that just serves as the glue.

 

This is overanalysing it for analysis' sake.

 

(Also, when you first meet Maria at the clock, the left statue will slot into place, giving you a hint that it can be moved.)

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Actually, it's been a while since I played it, but isn't one of the major paths

Spoiler

to the proper ending hidden behind a switch that requires having the devil familiar equipped to press it?

 

Surprised the vid didn't mention that?

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20 hours ago, Cyhwuhx said:

As the game mentions: the castle itself is a creature of chaos. That's the Castlevania vibe that it still contains within. If it were to become more Metroid/Zelda, it would've never worked because there aren't any mechanics to uphold such a density. This is way more RPG-influenced and thus fits the laid back design far better. The challenge comes from the enemies themselves not necessarily the game's world: that just serves as the glue.

 

This is overanalysing it for analysis' sake.

 

You're right that puzzle/world structure isn't everything, and that combat, inventory, and other mechanics play a massive role in a game's appeal and can make up for any number of shortcomings elsewhere.

 

But the Boss Keys video series isn't about those other elements: the whole point of the videos is to talk about the structure of Zelda dungeons and Metroidvanias. Fans often compare these games in terms of how linear or non-linear they are, but it's not often that someone brings them all together like this to do direct comparisons between them all.

 

I don't think it's overanalysis to investigate whether these games really live up to what fans praise about them.

 

I find his videos are a good blend of the objective (his dependency graphs!) and the subjective (in this case, his comments on why he thinks SOTN's structure and pacing isn't as well-balanced as the game's reputation suggests).

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