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22 minutes ago, Jamie John said:

I'd quite like a longer lens as at the moment the Sigma I have for my Nikkon is nice but it only goes to 50mm. Someone in trading is selling a 50-200mm Nikkon lens but it's not VR. How necessary is VR for handheld shots, and is 200mm long enough or is 50-300 a better range? I'm going to the Lake District in February and want to get some nice landscape shots.

 

Cheers.

 

VR usefulness is dependent on your shutter speed if handheld. The rule of thumb is that, to avoid camera shake softening your images,  the shutter speed should be no less than the focal length, e.g. 200mm focal length = minimum 1/200sec shutter speed (if you're using a Nikon APS-C body, don't forget to mulitply the focal length by 1.5). VR allows you to reduce this (depending on how effective the VR is). In turn, your shutter speed will be determined by the amount of light available (either at the location or due to the aperture setting) or the ISO sensitivity you're willing to use.

 

I assume the lens you mean is the Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6? I have the VR II version of that lens (you can get them for less than £100 2nd hand). I don't think I've used it in the last two years, and I tend to use my 18-140mm instead as, though it has less reach, it's more versatile with the wider angle available, especially for landscape stuff. My version of the 55-200mm has VR and I still had to bump up the ISO in dim conditions (e.g overcast days), even at the widest apertures, so a non-VR version is likely to be more susceptible to this being required.

 

Telephoto lenses can be good for picking out objects of interest in a landscape, but realistically you'd probably be better of using a tripod than hand-holding one (or at least finding a support of some sort).  If you've got an 18-55mm kit lens, you might find that that's a more useful option for landscapes, and more convenient to carry about on the camera if you're going to be shooting handheld - even if you do lose the option of those telephoto shots. When I use my 18-140mm (which is just the kit lens from the D7xxx range), although the zoom is useful to have, most of my shots tend to be taken at less than 55mm for landscape stuff.

 

Not sure what your budget is, but the Tamron SP AF 70-300 F/4-5.6 Di VC USD gets a good word-of-mouth if you want a decent telephoto zoom with VR. But, while comparatively not too expensive, it's still a lot more than the Nikkor 55-200mm.

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Thanks @FishyFish. The bloke in Trading want £45 for it, but I'll probably leave it based on what you've said, and other stuff I've read.

 

On the rare occasions I manage to get out with my camera nowadays, I do sometimes find that I'm limited by the zoom that I have when I'm trying to capture certain details, but, practically speaking, on the trip that I mentioned I'm going to be hiking with an infant strapped to my chest, so I don't think lugging around a big telephoto lens will be the best idea...

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I wonder if anybody has any experiences of working with a 135mm focal length?

 

I remain torn between picking up a cheap(er) 135mm f2 prime and saving for a 75-220mm zoomy zoom zoom. I wonder if it's going to have enough reach and not be too much of a niche length?

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23 hours ago, Halkyon said:

I wonder if anybody has any experiences of working with a 135mm focal length?

 

I remain torn between picking up a cheap(er) 135mm f2 prime and saving for a 75-220mm zoomy zoom zoom. I wonder if it's going to have enough reach and not be too much of a niche length?

 

What do you plan on using it for (and is it for a a full frame, or acrop sensor biody)?

 

I have a 135mm Zuiko f/2.8 that I use with my OM-1 film camera. It has considerably more reach than my 50mm. It's useful for getting in closer on things that aren't too far away, but I don't think it would be very helpful for something like wildlife for example (unless the subjects are quite close). It's pretty good as a longer portrait lens too.

 

I've toyed with the idea of adapting it to my MFT camera as the 2x crop factor would make it a 270mm equivalent there.

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@FishyFish The lenses under consideration are for crop; the Fuji 90mm f2 (135mm) and the 50-140 f2.8 (75-200mm). The prime can be had for ~£500 and the zoom ~£900(!).

 

In terms of subjects - people, events like goodwood revival, holidays, the occasional duck in a park or deer in the highlands. Nothing super far off but I like picking out details in the landscape.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Halkyon said:

@FishyFish The lenses under consideration are for crop; the Fuji 90mm f2 (135mm) and the 50-140 f2.8 (75-200mm). The prime can be had for ~£500 and the zoom ~£900(!).

 

In terms of subjects - people, events like goodwood revival, holidays, the occasional duck in a park or deer in the highlands. Nothing super far off but I like picking out details in the landscape.

 

 

 

Objectively, I think the zoom will be more useful than the prime. I'm not sure if the 135mm equivalent will give you enough reach for stuff like Goodwood or deer in the landscape type shots. It might be worth asking for a demo in a camera shop so you can get some idea of what the focal length will give you.

 

Do you need the fast apertures particularly? The cost of the lenses mentioned will largely be down to the fast / constant apertures which, while certainly nice to have, might not be needed and will also mean bigger and heavier chunks of glass to carry around. There are much cheaper options if you don't need the wider apertures (especially if you don't mind 2nd hand).

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Good point about the fast apertures. The 55-200mm f3.5-4.8 is about the same price as the prime (perhaps a little cheaper), but doesn't have the constant aperture of the pricey 50-140mm f2. Also I think I should rule out the 50-140 because it is massive.

 

So the good old prime vs. zoom decision at the same rough price. :)

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Thanks @Naysonymous. It seems it's actually a choice between the best Fuji prime vs. zoom flexibility. In this matter I lean towards primes - the 35mm hasn't come off the camera since I bought that lens in October.

 

I think I'll sell the 18-55mm that came with the body as I never use it and put the money towards getting the 18-135mm as an "all-rounder/travel" lens and the 90mm prime over the next few months. My target collection being the 16mm, 35mm, 90mm, and 18-135mm. Can't wait to get out there without getting frostbite on my fingers...

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I've got the 16mm f/1.4 prime. It's superb.  The 56 is my favourite Fuji lens I think.  I'm trying to get on with the 35mm f/2 but it just hasn't clicked with me yet.  It's good for shots of the kids as it focuses so quickly. 

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Interesting. Other than screwing up the DoF I've found the 35mm to be very intuitive (after totally sucking with the 18-55) - close to what the eye sees and all that - just got to be quite mobile when framing things! Sometimes it even looks cool when you take a photo by mistake...

 

 

DSCF3698.thumb.jpg.8fa9d570ebcf3bdf799679bb04c1dfeb.jpg

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I've know idea what I'm doing but interested in learning more about photography.  Not even sure what to get but someone mentioned a good camera in the Sony Alpha NEX-5R and having a look on ebay I found this. 

 

I'd be using it to take pictures inside on displays i.e. quite closeup shots as well as building fronts and landscapes as I wander about. Would like to stick some on a website so want good quality if possible.  Is this a good place to start? Already have some indoor lights and reflective screens as well as a tripod.  Lenses seem to be important and the above has some included. Any thoughts or suggestions?

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17 minutes ago, Halkyon said:

@Lorfarius That seems to be a decent camera, and take my opinion with a grain of salt as I'm quite new to this too, but I wouldn't buy anything without a viewfinder.

 

If you want mirrorless (interchangable lenses yay) then I'd have a read: https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/best-entry-level-mirrorless-camera

 

This sort of a thing? Link

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28 minutes ago, Lorfarius said:

 

This sort of a thing? Link

 

I think @Halkyon probably means a viewfinder in addition to (or instead of) the LCD screen on the rear of the camera, like shown here. On an SLR camera this will be an optical viewfinder (basically a glass prism and a mirror) that gives you a direct view through the camera's lens. On mirrorless cameras, it will be an Electronic View Finder (EVF), which is basically a small LCD screen behind an eyepiece.

 

LCD screens on the back of a camera such as the one you linked to are fine in many situations, but in some conditions they can be very difficult to use as they reflect light a bit like a mirror, meaning it's very hard to see the image and information being displayed. Optical viewfinders or EVF's don't have this issue.

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Yeah I mean an optical or electronic viewfinder as @FishyFish mentions. Another benefit for me at least is I find it easier to hold the camera steady with it up to my eye rather than waggling it about in front of me at a distance.

 

proxy.duckduckgo_com.jpg.593b21cb6e85900dd66d673bd07376c0.jpg

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On 30/01/2019 at 11:36, Lorfarius said:

I've know idea what I'm doing but interested in learning more about photography.  Not even sure what to get but someone mentioned a good camera in the Sony Alpha NEX-5R and having a look on ebay I found this. 

 

I'd be using it to take pictures inside on displays i.e. quite closeup shots as well as building fronts and landscapes as I wander about. Would like to stick some on a website so want good quality if possible.  Is this a good place to start? Already have some indoor lights and reflective screens as well as a tripod.  Lenses seem to be important and the above has some included. Any thoughts or suggestions?

 

For web pretty much anything from the past 10 years is fine. Difficult to recommend anything specific as it's mostly impossible to buy a bad camera from Nikon, Canon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus or Fuji. For the majority of use cases digital stills camera tech matured a while ago, and it's only for niche uses and for video that improvements are still being made.

 

I can only suggest having a play with some of the cameras in your local camera shop to see what you like and then an older version of that second hand from the likes of MPB as they come with a warranty. 

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Apologies if this has been posted before, but can anyone recommend a good, free image editing program, just for touching up and cropping shots. Something like a Lightroom lite that's simple to use and will allow me to convert RAW to TIFF and JPG. I don't take enough photographs to warrant paying £100 a year for the full-fat Lightroom, or whatever the annual sub is.

 

Cheers.

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12 hours ago, Jamie John said:

Apologies if this has been posted before, but can anyone recommend a good, free image editing program, just for touching up and cropping shots. Something like a Lightroom lite that's simple to use and will allow me to convert RAW to TIFF and JPG. I don't take enough photographs to warrant paying £100 a year for the full-fat Lightroom, or whatever the annual sub is.

 

Cheers.


 

Oftentimes, your camera manufacturer has software which will do this. It's just, in my experience, not as easy or thought out as well as Lightroom. Though, colours could certainly be better.


For example, Canon has Digital Photo Professional:
https://www.canon-europe.com/support/consumer_products/software/digital-photo-professional.aspx


Sony has Imaging Edge, which just has had an update:
https://support.d-imaging.sony.co.jp/app/imagingedge/en/download/


Etc.


I've also used darktable in the past, but found it a bit clunky, could be better now:
https://www.darktable.org/

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56 minutes ago, rev-happy performance said:


 

Oftentimes, your camera manufacturer has software which will do this. It's just, in my experience, not as easy or thought out as well as Lightroom. Though, colours could certainly be better.


For example, Canon has Digital Photo Professional:
https://www.canon-europe.com/support/consumer_products/software/digital-photo-professional.aspx


Sony has Imaging Edge, which just has had an update:
https://support.d-imaging.sony.co.jp/app/imagingedge/en/download/


Etc.


I've also used darktable in the past, but found it a bit clunky, could be better now:
https://www.darktable.org/

 

Cheers. I'd been using the Nikkon one previously so I'll just keep on with it. It's a bit clunky but it meets my needs, really.

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Anyone experimented with "vintage" lenses? Quite attractive given their availability for sod all on eBay and in charity shops.

 

I bought one of those trendy Helios 58mm f2 lenses that's supposed to produce swiiiiiiirly bokeh. Here stuck on camera with M42 adaptor.

 

 

20190204_095220-s.thumb.jpg.e7113e96bb2c84ec537fde5dff72e860.jpg

 

I haven't gotten any swirls yet... but some pretty colours with a macro tube.

 

 

_DSF4253.thumb.jpg.06de57ba97274810074a8866e60a2dc1.jpg

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On 04/02/2019 at 19:17, Halkyon said:

Anyone experimented with "vintage" lenses? Quite attractive given their availability for sod all on eBay and in charity shops.

 

I bought one of those trendy Helios 58mm f2 lenses that's supposed to produce swiiiiiiirly bokeh. Here stuck on camera with M42 adaptor.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

20190204_095220-s.thumb.jpg.e7113e96bb2c84ec537fde5dff72e860.jpg

 

I haven't gotten any swirls yet... but some pretty colours with a macro tube.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

_DSF4253.thumb.jpg.06de57ba97274810074a8866e60a2dc1.jpg

 

I've been doing this for a few years with varying results.

IMG_20190209_124947-1587x1190.thumb.jpg.90882500a2cf4b0a0e000f9dbf717b44.jpg

 

I had two of those lenses kicking about anyway so it was a cheap way to get new glass when I changed from Canon DSLR to the EM-5 for cost reasons.

 

The problem I have is focus, it's so hard to get the image in focus manually when shooting at wide apertures or really zoomed.

 

I do get some really nice 'vintage' film looking shots though without needing to process them much.

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I've got a bunch of film cameras that I shoot regularly, so have a collection of lenses there, but the only ones I've tried adapting to digital are my Nikon F-mount lenses (none of which are particularly old - in fact most of them are still available to buy new). I'm in the same boat as @Agent L when it comes to focussing them. Even when zooming in and using the focus peaking on my Lumix GX-7, I still struggle to get really sharp images.

 

As an aside, it's a little annoying that the supply of old lenses I'd like for my film cameras is now becoming more expensive thanks to people buying them to adapt!

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On 04/02/2019 at 19:17, Halkyon said:

Anyone experimented with "vintage" lenses? Quite attractive given their availability for sod all on eBay and in charity shops.

 

I bought one of those trendy Helios 58mm f2 lenses that's supposed to produce swiiiiiiirly bokeh. Here stuck on camera with M42 adaptor.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

20190204_095220-s.thumb.jpg.e7113e96bb2c84ec537fde5dff72e860.jpg

 

I haven't gotten any swirls yet... but some pretty colours with a macro tube.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

_DSF4253.thumb.jpg.06de57ba97274810074a8866e60a2dc1.jpg

 

Sure have! Mostly M42 stuff. Can be a bit trickier to get the full Helios swirly effect on a crop sensor but you can still get some nice results

 

I'm a big fan of SMC Takumars — render stuff beautifully, handle silkily and are built like tanks. Have a bunch of Russian stuff (Helios 44-2, Mir 1b, Mir 20M, Jupiter 11A) which all give quite interesting looks. If you can find a 1b cheap then it's a fun one to play around with by reversing the front element.

 

Managed to find a Minolta MD 35-70mm macro a while back for around £15 (It's a Leica design/Minolta build but the Leica-branded version usually goes for £400-600). Fantastic Minolta colours, great bokeh. Not the fastest lens, but it's one of those zooms that's like a pocketful of nice primes.

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OK it's time for an upgrade. It has been many years since I got my Canon 30D and it is now categorically shit by modern standards, even with decent lenses. And I want full frame.

 

I've got a few EF and one EF-S lens which is sadly my most used lens, 18-200 IS, even though it's a bit on the soft side. I haven't spent stupid money on any of them.

 

I can mathematically afford any of these options but it's not like money is no object. I don't do enough shooting to justify it. I just like it to work well when I do.

 

Should I go for;

Bangernomics with a used 5D (mark 2?) and a decent EF zoom?

An EOS R with a bundled RF 24-105 and an adapter that will fit all the old lenses. Futureproofing? But will they bring out a load of improvements in their next gen mirrorless next week?

An 80D and carry on with the same lenses.

Dump Canon and get a Sony?

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@choddo 

 

As you've not specified a specific usage, I guess it's for family, friends, holidays etc ? Any of those will be more than good enough for that, and you can get away with spending less on cheaper/older cameras should you want to.

 

Have a play with a few at a shop ? Now that digital stills tech has matured I find ergonomics one of the main things when buying a new camera

 

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I like shooting a few things outside of that;

 

landscapes and architecture. Maybe that’s normal holiday fodder

macro plants/insects

portraits. Dabbling.

the moon. Badly. Still need an 800mm or a telescoooop mount. Let’s leave that one off the list.

 

and yeah. Ergonomics is really important. My wife’s camera not having a second wheel drives me nuts in manual mode.

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I'd just go to Jessops or similar and have a play with a few cameras. You could probably top trump the specs of the various cameras and compare the sensors on dxomark if you're a gear head, but in the end any of the cameras you've listed will be fine for what you want to do.

 

Having said that the only one on your list I probably wouldn't bother with is the EOS R. It's tech is a generation behind Sony's and there isn't many native lenses for it. While it's a not a bad camera, it made the worst of 2018 lists for a few bloggers. Crop or full frame Canon DSLR or Sony mirrorless depending on your tastes.

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On 11/02/2019 at 21:32, choddo said:

OK it's time for an upgrade. It has been many years since I got my Canon 30D and it is now categorically shit by modern standards, even with decent lenses. And I want full frame.

 

I've got a few EF and one EF-S lens which is sadly my most used lens, 18-200 IS, even though it's a bit on the soft side. I haven't spent stupid money on any of them.

 

I can mathematically afford any of these options but it's not like money is no object. I don't do enough shooting to justify it. I just like it to work well when I do.

 

Should I go for;

Bangernomics with a used 5D (mark 2?) and a decent EF zoom?

An EOS R with a bundled RF 24-105 and an adapter that will fit all the old lenses. Futureproofing? But will they bring out a load of improvements in their next gen mirrorless next week?

An 80D and carry on with the same lenses.

Dump Canon and get a Sony?

 

The EOS R next week will be an entry level mirrorless.

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