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The HD/Blu-ray Thread


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North American high-definition television sales grew about 60% to 10 million units in the fourth quarter as Samsung and Sony gained market share at the expense of Sharp and other manufacturers, NPD Group unit DisplaySearch said.

The number of flat-panel units, which include liquid-crystal display and plasma display panel televisions, increased 56% last quarter in the U.S. and Canada, as TV makers produced fewer rear-projection TVs, DisplaySearch said.

HDTV sales have grown almost in lockstep with flat-panel unit growth. With the costs of making high-definition panels falling relative to standard-definition panels, HDTVs made up about 95% of LCD units, up from 86% a year earlier, according to Paul Gagnon, director of North America TV research. About 98% of plasma units were HD.

“Flat-panel TVs are almost the entire market,” Mr. Gagnon said. “The transition from rear projection is almost complete.”

Samsung, with a 13% flat-panel share in North America, maintained market leadership by almost doubling its LCD sales. Sony, with 11%, leapfrogged Vizio and Sharp to land in the No. 2 position by boosting promotions in U.S. big-box retailers during the holiday season, DisplaySearch said.

Matsushita’s Panasonic brand sold 39% of North American plasma TVs and the parent company had a 37% plasma market share worldwide, DisplaySearch said last week. Samsung had more than a 20% share of the plasma TV market both in North America and worldwide, while Matsushita, Samsung and LGE made more than 75% of fourth-quarter plasma sets sold in both North America and worldwide.

Many manufacturers switched their emphasis to LCD from plasma, whose 6% North American growth rate was dwarfed by LCD’s 64% increase. Worldwide, plasma unit sales jumped 62% as 1,080-resolution-line panels became more common.

“Plasma TVs are restricted to 40 inches or bigger,” Mr. Gagnon said. “They’ve kind of been rallied behind by just a few manufacturers.”

The jump in HDTV sales likely will continue into the first quarter.

Last week, the Consumer Electronics Association said U.S. customers bought about 2.4 million HD TVs for the Feb. 3 Super Bowl, while the National Retail Federation said standard- and high-definition television purchases for the game would be 3.9 million units, up from 2.5 million last year.

In Europe HDTV may be slow taking off, but it definitely isn't the case in the US

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...you're forgetting there wasn't a confusing format war going on at the time...and also that to gain the benefit at that time, you didn't have to upgrade (or recently have done so) your TV.

Also there was alot more reasons to buy dvd, the hd formats dont offer that much to the average user.

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Also there was alot more reasons to buy dvd, the hd formats dont offer that much to the average user.

exactly. The benefits of DVD were huge, greatly improved picture, the ability to play a film from anywhere at the touch of a button, indepth features and so on. Plus you didn't need a new DVD to use it.

Hi-Def on the other hand simply offers better picture and sound and web extras that most don't seem to give a shit about. And because the average consumer apparently has a 32" TV the extra picture quality the format offers is neglible on such a small screen. I love high definition, but unless studios drop DVD (highly unlikely) it's going to be nothing more than this generation's laser disk (which suits me fine).

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In Europe HDTV may be slow taking off, but it definitely isn't the case in the US

I would have thought it's only a matter of time. All the suppliers have to do is reduce the amount of SD TV's on offer and start making HDTV standard. It's happened over here. Just walking through the likes of Comet and theres next to no SDTV sets on the shop floor. The big HDTV flatscreens covering everything.

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North American high-definition television sales grew about 60% to 10 million units in the fourth quarter as Samsung and Sony gained market share at the expense of Sharp and other manufacturers, NPD Group unit DisplaySearch said.

That's a very interesting figure (to my mind). Part of the argument about HDTV cross over is that it's all very well HD sets being the only ones you can buy but people aren't being forced to change TV sets (which can last for years and years) so it doesn't mean that the majority of people are going to have one anytime soon.

However in the US you're looking at about 100 million households. That means that in one quarter potentially 10% of house holds have bought an HDTV set (I appreciate it's not as simple as that, people might be upgrading to a larger screen size having already had an HD screen or buying a second HD set etc..). However with sales like that (and especially if they continue to grow) you could get to a point towards the end of next year where over 50% of American households have an HD set. That's pretty amazing.

Although looking at the figures for sets sold around the time of the super bowl 3/8 of the sets sold where SD sets.

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meh its all just rumours still though. i for one WONT be selling my hd dvd collection, as i have some great titles that arent available on blu ray (yet) it will be sad though if hd dvd does go, as the region free was its killer app for me. still cant complain too much as i have a ps3 too for blu ray :(

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I can't see the point of selling your HD DVD's, surely it's best to keep them while you still have the drive.

Because I can use the money to pay for a Blu Ray player which will lost a damn site longer than the year or so HD DVD has managed. Most annoyed. I would never have bought one before Xmas if it was going to happen so quickly. I even went and spent £150 on the discs. Not pleased at all.

I'm going to sort the lot out this weekend and get it sold. At least that way I might be able to salvage a decent amount from it all.

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Apparently Sears in America were selling the BD-P1200 for $93 over the weekend and completely sold out. It's not even meant to be that great a blu-ray player.

Toshiba LOL

Isn't that the one a guy is suing Toshiba over in the States for being incompatible with loads of big movies?

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I had some weird faffing with The Kingdom HD-DVD last night on the 360 player. It froze up just before the 1-hour mark, despite the disc being mint. Before it started it downloaded a patch of some sort, so I went online to find what was what. Turns out a few people have had similar problems with a number of discs. In the end I had to delete the cookies from the HD-DVD drive, unplug the USB and plug it back in then boot the disc up again. Now it's fine.

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I think that's Samsung. Some fault that a firmware upgrade only partially rectified.

Aye, it is a Samsung. I'm just amused that despite the fact that its meant to be utterly horrible, they have still managed to outsell hd dvd players despite the massive price drops that have been happening.

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There's no accounting for utter stupidity. It is that player about which the class action suit is being brought.

Lorfarius, if you've got the Matrix Trilogy - can I have first bagsy?

Fraid I haven't but I'll most likely bung a thread in Trading with it all in at some point.

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I had some weird faffing with The Kingdom HD-DVD last night on the 360 player. It froze up just before the 1-hour mark, despite the disc being mint. Before it started it downloaded a patch of some sort, so I went online to find what was what. Turns out a few people have had similar problems with a number of discs. In the end I had to delete the cookies from the HD-DVD drive, unplug the USB and plug it back in then boot the disc up again. Now it's fine.

I had exactly the same problem with The Bourne Ultimatum. Utter piece of shit.

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