Jump to content

The Goonies


Twyford
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Treble said:

 

It's absolutely fascinating to me, and I think there's a big ol' book you could write on it.

 

Forefront in my mind when you compare kids eighties movies (particularly - but not limited to - Amblin) and modern 'kids' films (which are basically YA adaptations) is the treatment of freedom.

 

There's a sense in The Goonies (and ET, and dozens of others) that all the wars are won, the borders secure, and all wars are Cold ones. The Baby Boomers are making the films, and their parents survived WWII to make their kids - and their country - safe. The parents of that era were laxer with their kids' safety  (or more trustworthy of their sensibilities, whichever view you subscribe to) than in any other point in maybe the previous 200 years or more. So child development was about using your freedom and your wits to surpass your elders, whilst simultaneously feeling like the whole world was a safe sandbox, where your childlike fantasies could be indulged.

 

Modern kids films reflect our era of paranoia and terrorism. In the YA films (even the likes of Harry Potter) the elders have failed them, they are not safe in their own home/city/country and are besieged by corrupt governments (Hunger Games and the like) or terrorists.

 

When you think about it, Voldemort is the absolute uber Western terrorist. He was an outsider at school who torments and brutalises anyone who is not 'pure' (or 'is other') and comes back to the school to kill all its pupils. Intentionally or not, Voldemort is the new villain archetype of the millenium; Dumbledore the adult archetype: well-meaning adult who, nonetheless, has failed his students by withholding information and freedom.

 

The YA films are filled with tiredness, relectance and a sense of kids being beleaguered. They have to shoulder adult roles they are too young for, and have any innocence purged via trials they shouldn't have to face.

 

TL;DR: eighties kids films reflected the (heavily bordered) freedom Gen Xers had; 2010s kids films reflect the era of domestic terrorism Millenials have to put up with.

Good post.

 

I've read a few YA books (which have ended up as films) which almost seem to be torture porn for kids - the protagonists are put through horrendous ordeals, characters suffer terribly and many face gruesome deaths, and the plots are twisted and squashed to enable that at the expense of any persistent narrative logic. That seems a bit cynical to me. And while the Harry Potter books also have their fair share of (relative) nastiness it's much more tempered and contextualised, and, crucially, they have a huge dollop of heart and soul to them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Chosty said:

Good post.

 

I've read a few YA books (which have ended up as films) which almost seem to be torture porn for kids - the protagonists are put through horrendous ordeals, characters suffer terribly and many face gruesome deaths, and the plots are twisted and squashed to enable that at the expense of any persistent narrative logic. That seems a bit cynical to me. And while the Harry Potter books also have their fair share of (relative) nastiness it's much more tempered and contextualised, and, crucially, they have a huge dollop of heart and soul to them. 

 

Good point, and I think what I put down applies more to their Hollywood-ised interpretations than the novels. When I think back on the HP books I think of the core group and the charm and solidity of their relationship. In the films, it's obviously all about the action and the drama.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Chosty said:

...crucially, they have a huge dollop of heart and soul to them. 

 

2 minutes ago, Treble said:

Good point, and I think what I put down applies more to their Hollywood-ised interpretations than the novels. When I think back on the HP books I think of the core group and the charm and solidity of their relationship. In the films, it's obviously all about the action and the drama.

 

Both excellent points. When it comes down to it Harry Potter is all about the innate goodness in people. Everyone has good and evil in them but it's what they choose to do that shows what sort of person they are. Most of the 'evil' characters are portrayed as being like they are to varying degrees because of how they've been treated rather than just being bad.

 

Probably safe, but just in case.

 

Spoiler

Even Tom Riddle is shown to have been poorly treated and misunderstood for being different at the orphanage, growing up with no love or parental guidance. Draco Malfoy is mean and treats others poorly as he himself is treated by his dad. He is ruled by fear at home and in turn simply applies the same when at school. The house elf who's a racist is shown again to be a product of his environment and when he's shown some kindness and is treated as something of an equal he responds in a positive manner.

 

The only one who seems just to be a total fucker with no back story is Bellatrix.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Treble that's a great read mate!

 

The Goonies for me sits in a genre, category and ranking system all by itself and will never be beaten. It's on of the main reasons why I enjoyed Stranger Things so much and even more evidence that for a film / TV show to capture that sense of freedom and adventure nowadays it has to be set in a different era. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

I've just watched the Cyndi Lauper music video for the 1st time. It's very ... 80s - 12 minutes of "hilarious" stereotypes,  random wrestlers, band crossovers (the Bangles are pirates!), and a 4th wall break by Steven Spielberg. I can't say it's terrible in a cheesy, retro way. It's just awful. The only good thing is the octopus (which is kinda scary).

 

Full video in the spoiler

 

Spoiler

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because of this coming up, I began wondering how effective the Goonies would have been in saving their town. Thankfully, other people have thought so, too:

 

https://www.rsvlts.com/blogs/news/did-the-goonies-really-save-their-homes

 

Quote

As for Uncle Sam, the Abandoned Shipwrecks Act didn’t become law until 1988, so in 1985 The Goonies are lawfully engaged in wrecking: “taking valuables from a shipwreck which has foundered or run aground close to shore.” And even better, the maritime law of finds says The Goonies can keep everything they found! Huzzah!

 

…Or so it would seem, because this ship has immense historical value. (Willy was, after all, the first Goonie) If it’s on “lands owned or controlled” by the U.S. the American Antiquities Act of 1906 bequeaths custody to the Secretaries of Interior, Agriculture, or War (replaced by Defense in 1947). Those cabinets only greenlight third-party recovery to public institutions like museums and schools. 

 

If the Inferno is on federal lands, The Goonies lose the treasure to the government. If it’s not, they lose it to the land’s owners. At best they’d receive 50% of its  value in salvage commission, before lawyer costs to demonstrate the many personal risks they endured during recovery. But they’re just as likely to be fined $500 for violating the Act, while field officers snatch that pirate booty. It belongs, as another Spielberg character once said, in a museum. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.