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Just got back, was underwhelmed. Was very funny, but it wasn't as funny as it had the potential to be.

There wasn't enough 'interviews', which are the essence of Borat and the source of most of the humour, and the majority of the film you've already seen if you've seen the two trailers.

The Pamela Anderson section was absolutely priceless however, genuinely shocking and hilarious at the same time.

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Funniest film I have EVER seen, without a shadow of a doubt.

There's one scene about three quarters of the way through that is unquestionably to my mind the most hilarious couple of minutes of film ever.

The naked fight between Borat and his producer. Destined to become a comedy classic.

So many quotable bits in the movie. Some amazing lines.

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I liked it. Very funny in places. The only Borat I'd ever seen before was in the trailer, so it was all very fresh.

The dinner party scene was excellent. The look on the woman's face when he carried his turd back to the table in a plastic bag was priceless.

Does the host wipe me?

So how many of the intervews are staged? It'd be nice to think it was only the obvious things (the Pam Anderson scene, etc.), but lots of the scenes had multiple camera angles and some other things which pointed to it all being scripted. And in the non-scripted scenes (I'm guessing that at least some of them are non-scripted), do the people know they're being filmed? Surely they need to give their permission for their clips to be used, and I just can't understand why anybody (even the dumb racists) would allow their scenes to be shown. How does it all work?

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I liked it. Very funny in places. The only Borat I'd ever seen before was in the trailer, so it was all very fresh.

The dinner party scene was excellent. The look on the woman's face when he carried his turd back to the table in a plastic bag was priceless.

Does the host wipe me?

So how many of the intervews are staged? It'd be nice to think it was only the obvious things (the Pam Anderson scene, etc.), but lots of the scenes had multiple camera angles and some other things which pointed to it all being scripted. And in the non-scripted scenes (I'm guessing that at least some of them are non-scripted), do the people know they're being filmed? Surely they need to give their permission for their clips to be used, and I just can't understand why anybody (even the dumb racists) would allow their scenes to be shown. How does it all work?

I read that prior to filming, they pose as a real television film crew, and get permission at that point to film.

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I read that prior to filming, they pose as a real television film crew, and get permission at that point to film.

Interviews were set up via a fictional TV company. Money was paid & permission given after each interview. Most didn't know what it was for, just glad to be paid.

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I enjoyed it, but not as much as I was hoping to.

A lot of the funnier scenes I had already seen in trailers etc, but it was good to see them in context.

The scene that veloS and Eighthours have spoilered got the most laughs from me, and the rest of the audience for that matter.

Not the straight up classic that I was hoping for but enjoyable nonetheless.

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I really didn't like it, and that annoyed me as everyone else in the cinema were pissing themselves. The Pamela bit fell flat for me, as it was obviously staged, and a lot of the scenes seemed to be, too. The naked wrestling bit was a bit funny.

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I havent seen it as it doesnt arrive until the 19th of november.

However, heres the NYT review.......

From Kazakhstan, Without a Clue

Sometime in early 2005, a mustachioed Kazakh journalist known as Borat Sagdiyev slipped into America with the intention of making a documentary for the alleged good of his Central Asian nation. Many months later, the funny bruised fruits of his labor, “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan,” are poised to hit the collective American conscience with a juicy splat. The Minutemen, those self-anointed guardians of American sovereignty, were watching the wrong border.

Borat, who just recently invited the “mighty warlord” George W. Bush to the premiere of his film before a gaggle of excited news crews, is the dim brainchild of Sacha Baron Cohen, the British comic best known until now for another of his pseudonymous identities, Ali G. Described by his creator as a “wannabe gangsta,” Ali G was the host of a British television show, starting in 2000 (HBO had the American edition), where, as the voice of “the yoof,” he interviewed serious and self-serious movers and shakers, including “Boutros Boutros Boutros-Ghali,” Sam Donaldson and Richard Kerr, a former deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency, who found himself explaining why terrorists could not drive a train into the White House. (No tracks.)

Mr. Baron Cohen succeeded in seducing politicians and pornography stars alike, mostly because Ali G’s phenomenal stupidity made the character seem harmless. He also seemed to represent the ultimate in media big game: young people. Dressed like a Backstreet Boy, complete with Day-Glo romper suits, designer initials and a goatee that looked as if it had been painted on with liquid eyeliner, he was met with bewilderment, exasperation and patience that at times bordered on the saintly. Like Borat and Bruno, another of the comic’s similarly obtuse television alter egos who made regular appearances on the shows, the joke was equally on Ali G and on the targets of his calculated ignorance.

With Borat, Mr. Baron Cohen took the same basic idea that had worked with Ali G and pushed it hard, then harder. The joke begins with an apparently never-washed gray suit badly offset by brown shoes, which the performer accents with a small Afro and the kind of mustache usually now seen only in 1970s pornography, leather bars and trend articles. Think Harry Reems, circa 1972, but by way of the Urals. Married or widowed, and he appears to be both, Borat loves women, including his sister, the “No. 4 prostitute” in Kazakhstan, with whom he shares lusty face time in the film’s opener. He’s a misogynist (a woman’s place is in the cage), which tends to go unnoticed because he’s also casually anti-Semitic.

That Mr. Baron Cohen plays the character’s anti-Semitism for laughs is his most radical gambit. The Anti-Defamation League, for one, has chided him, warning that some people may not be in on the joke. And a sampling of comments on blogs where you can watch some of the older Borat routines, including a singalong in an Arizona bar with the refrain “Throw the Jew down the well,” indicates that the Anti-Defamation League is at least partly right: some people are definitely not in on the joke, though only because some people are too stupid and too racist to understand that the joke is on them. As the 19th-century German thinker August Bebel observed, anti-Semitism is the socialism of fools, a truism Mr. Baron Cohen has embraced with a vengeance.

Given this, it seems instructive to note how discussions of Borat, including the sympathetic and the suspicious, often circle over to the issue of Mr. Baron Cohen’s own identity. Commentators often imply that Borat wouldn’t be funny if Mr. Baron Cohen were not Jewish, which is kind of like saying that Dave Chappelle wouldn’t be funny if he were not black. For these performers, the existential and material givens of growing up as a Jew in Britain and as a black man in America provide not only an apparently limitless source of fertile comic material, but they are also inseparable from their humor. But no worries: Borat makes poop jokes and carries a squawking chicken around in a suitcase.

Like General Sherman, he also lays waste to a sizable swath of the South, a line of attack that begins in New York and ends somewhere between the Hollywood Hills and Pamela Anderson’s bosom. The story opens in Kazakhstan (apparently it was shot in a real Romanian village that looks remarkably like the set for a 1930s Universal horror flick), where Borat sketches out his grand if hazy plans before heading off in a horse-drawn auto. Once in New York, in between planting kisses on startled strangers and taking instruction from a humor coach, he defecates in front of a Trump tower (Donald Trump was one of Ali G’s more uncooperative guests) and masturbates in front of a Victoria’s Secret store. The jackass has landed.

It gets better or worse, sometimes at the same time. Whether you rush for the exits or laugh until your lungs ache will depend both on your appreciation for sight gags, eyebrow gymnastics, sustained slapstick and vulgar malapropisms, and on whether you can stomach the shock of smashed frat boys, apparently sober rodeo attendees and one exceedingly creepy gun-store clerk, all taking the toxic bait offered to them by their grinning interlocutor. There is nothing here as singularly frightening as when, during his run on HBO, Borat encountered a Texan who enthused about the Final Solution. That said, the gun clerk’s suggestion of what kind of gun to use to hunt Jews will freeze your blood, especially when you realize that he hasn’t misheard Borat’s mangled English.

That scene may inspire accusations that Mr. Baron Cohen is simply trading on cultural and regional stereotypes, and he is, just not simply. The brilliance of “Borat” is that its comedy is as pitiless as its social satire, and as brainy. Mr. Baron Cohen isn’t yet a total filmmaker like Jerry Lewis (the film was directed by Larry Charles, who has given it a suitably cheap video look), but the comic’s energy and timing inform every scene of “Borat,” which he wrote with Anthony Hines, Peter Baynham and his longtime writing and production partner, Dan Mazer. These guys push political buttons, but they also clear room for two hairy men to wrestle nude in a gaspingly raw interlude of physical slapstick that nearly blasts a hole in the film.

Clenched in unspeakably crude formation, those hairy bodies inspire enormous laughs, but they also serve an elegant formal function. The sheer outrageousness of the setup temporarily pulls you out of the story, which essentially works along the lines of one of the Bob Hope-Bing Crosby road movies, though with loads of smut and acres of body hair, relieving you of the burden of having to juggle your laughter with your increasingly abused conscience. Just when you’re ready to cry, you howl.

“If the comic can berate and finally blow the bully out of the water,” Mr. Lewis once wrote, “he has hitched himself to an identifiable human purpose.” Sacha Baron Cohen doesn’t blow bullies out of the water; he obliterates them.

“Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan” is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). It includes raw language, naked men and nude wrestling.

BORAT

Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan

Opens today nationwide.

Directed by Larry Charles; written by Sacha Baron Cohen, Anthony Hines, Peter Baynham and Dan Mazer, based on a story by Mr. Baron Cohen, Mr. Baynham, Mr. Hines and Todd Phillips, and a character created by Mr. Baron Cohen; directors of photography, Anthony Hardwick and Luke Geissbühler; edited by Peter Teschner and James Thomas; music by Erran Baron Cohen; produced by Sacha Baron Cohen and Jay Roach; released by 20th Century Fox. Running time: 89 minutes.

WITH: Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat), Ken Davitian (Azamat), Luenell (Luenell), Alex Daniels (Naked Fight Coordinator), James P. Vickers (Kidnapping Consultant), Peewee Piemonte (Safety) and Michael Li, Harry Wowchuk and Nicole Randall (Action Team).

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The Pamela bit fell flat for me, as it was obviously staged, and a lot of the scenes seemed to be, too.

The Pamela scene was a real let down for me. Especially since the entire film had been building towards it. Missed opportunity for sure.

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That was one of the weirdest experiences I've had in the cinema for quite a while. I thought it'd be great watching it with an audience and I definitely wanted to see it this weekend so I opted for Friday night rather than the inevitable crowds of school kids Saturday/Sunday. But anyway...

Talk about missing the point in every single scene. Just an example:

Borat: What is the best gun to shoot a Jew with?

[Audience in hysterics]

Gun shop owner: Probably a 9mm glock

[Nothing.]

I think a lot of the people there thought it was funny because they though he was taking the piss out of the middle east, like all those Osama Bin Laden flash games a few years ago almost.

Oh well.

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My only issue was that it was sometimes hard to hear over the laughing!

Yeah had the same problem. Wonder if cinemas everywhere are being asked to put this film on a louder volume?

As for laughing at the wrong things, I really do think that theres many who laugh hardest at the 'funny bits in the trailer'. Pfft, I laughed about once in the entire film (It was actually for something really odd as well - like when he is in sitting in the chair on the hotel singing 'I'm king of the castle!'). I just don't laugh at all even though I found this to be a really funny film, I'm just weird, I know...

There was some moron in the audience though, like at the start when borat kisses that woman and this guy goes 'Its his sister!!'...I remember thinking 'this guy really REALLY doesn't deserve to live...'

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Still haven't managed to see this!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_nEXTan81s

Of all his recent interviews, the very end of this one has had me laughing the most. He is shown a video of an actual Kazakhi man criticising Borat in his language, and Borat interprets (Sacha initially laughs out of character but manages to hold himself).

This man is still a very jealous. He is the cousin of Urkin the Rapist, and he is very jealous that i cast Urkin the Rapist and not this man, who is Tarashenk the Rapist, not in my film.

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I thought it was very funny, but overall it was kinda disappointing because it wasn't half as good as his TV interviews!

I would have liked to have seen more interviews and 'real life' things in there, as a lot of them seem to be cut pretty short. It was hilarious when he was talking to those black guys, and so was the bit in the hotel reception afterwards, but I wanted to see more! :) The staged parts in between just weren't that funny.

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I would have liked to have seen more interviews and 'real life' things in there, as a lot of them seem to be cut pretty short.

Apparently Larry Charles, who directed this, has said that there was just so much extra footage that he wants to use them in a tv series. I personally can't imagine how he'll do that. Regardless, the DVD'll be a must-have.

And apparently Sacha will start work on a 'follow-up' to Borat but as a different character with some saying that it'll be Bruno!

Found another outtake gem, this time of Bruno interviewing Hollywood stylist Daniel Dicriscio:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=so89Ut-_VT0

"So who is Daniel Dicriscio?

Where is Daniel Dicriscio?

What is Daniel Dicriscio?

Why is Daniel Dicriscio?

Where is Daniel Dicriscio?

When is Daniel Dicriscio?

What is Daniel Dicriscio?

Will is Daniel Dicriscio?"

:)

*Edit* and just found another outtake of Bruno (unreleased on tv), one of the funniest Bruno scenes i've seen - he goes to see a psychic:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJWekfak_1c...ted&search=

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And apparently Sacha will start work on a 'follow-up' to Borat but as a different character with some saying that it'll be Bruno!

Yes, it's in the middle of massive bidding war for the rights to make/distribute the movie.

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I wish he would do a 'proper' Ali G movie but its too late now , the borat movie was perfect timing. Maybe a new character is called for because Bruno just doesn't come across as being anywhere near as complex as the other 2 characters.

Although I did like how Bruno's victims were celebrities. I think that still has potential if done well.

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It’s really good for sure but I was expecting a bit more.

The best sequence for me was when he was in the camper van with the Frat Boys; I was wiping the tears away when the jock guy was banging on about minorities having the upper-hand in America and every shot of the fat guy just killed me. Pure magic.

I felt a bit bad laughing at some of it; the whole dinner party sequence was pretty uncomfortable. They seemed like decent people who have him over for dinner and they end up with shit-in-a-bag and a massive hooker.

Over all, very good but I thought Ricky Bobby was funnier.

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I prefer the shorter sketches, but there was still a lot to laugh at and be scared of. Don't think it's as good as the critics make it out to be, though.

I'm not the biggest fan of the staged parts, though the Jew opening and hotel scene were hilarious I thought. Borat is at his best when he reaches for America's underbelly though.

The guy he spoke with before the rodeo and told him that he should get rich of his 'tache because it made him look Muslim for example. I really digged the diner scene where he praised the two women next to him but dissed the other. The look on her hubby's face was priceless. Scariest thing was that religious gathering though. Good grief.

I did find the South Park a better satire though.

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