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The Bassist Hall of Fame


SM47
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Absolutely. He proves that being a frustrated guitarist can lead to being a brilliant bassist. He doesn't get the props he deserves ('Come On and Let The Good Times Roll', for example. Stunning).

I dunno, I read somewhere that on the majority of Experience tracks (not including the tracks on 'Are You Experienced?') Hendrix went back and rerecorded most of the basslines.

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I dunno, I read somewhere that on the majority of Experience tracks (not including the tracks on 'Are You Experienced?') Hendrix went back and rerecorded most of the basslines.

Yeah, that'll be large chunks of Electric Ladyland, mainly, and a couple of tracks on Axis. Noel actually said that Hendrix's sly overdubbing was a major factor in the souring of their relations.

But,

Listen back to original Experience live dates before exhaustion and business concerns set in (such as Winterland) and marvel with awe at his prowess. He could play as mean, heavy and tight as yer nan. Billy Cox never sounded right on those older tracks.

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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Victor Wooten yet.

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I've gotten massively into his stuff lately, he's one of those players that can easily pull off being intensely technical and virtuoso without comprimising his powerful groove and feel. Very funky stuff.

I've been watching this Youtube vid of him daily for like a week now.

The other two bassists that are currently influencing me heavily are Chris Wolstenholme of Muse

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And Tim Commerford of Rage Against The Machine/Audioslave

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Both display shining examples of how a powerful, angry and driving bassist should sound.

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I dunno really, I think the majority of people who are into 70s jazz fusion know who Jaco was because he was in Weather Report and that. And he played with Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams and John McLaughlin and stuff.

I'm not dissing Wooten or nothing, he's a quality player.

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I'm not dissing Wooten or nothing, he's a quality player.

Yeah I know mate, I wasn't defending either :D Just discussing, I'm quite sure you're more in the know than I am.

You're probably quite right about Jaco too, though i think it's safe to say pull a punkass kid off the street and ask them about either bassist and they'd know nothing, In fact they'd quite likely ask "What are they Emo, or Emo...er?" -_-

...

PUNKASS KIDS!

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Geddy Lee wins at bassplaying. -_-

Shame about his voice though.

JOKEZZZZZZZ.

I'm quite sure you're more in the know than I am.

It's not really about 'being in the know'. If you like Wooten, then whatever. It's cool. That's what buzzes me most about music. Everyone's opinions are valid and no-one's opinions are valid.

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It's not really about 'being in the know'. If you like Wooten, then whatever. It's cool. That's what buzzes me most about music. Everyone's opinions are valid and no-one's opinions are valid.

Fair point. I do, however, feel I should know much more about the technical side of our instrument, I should have listened to and absorbed the styles of more of it's greatest artists, and most of all I wish that I knew the ins and outs of all the equipment better - I mean, in my mind I have a perfect vision of the ideal tone and ultimate effects set up that I want to one day have, but because of a lack of in depth knowledge I don't know how to achieve it all.

I think the reason I lack lots of the said criteria is that I started my instrument very recently (less than 2 years ago) but with this immense drive that's still going strong. As a result i've reached a very respectable technical skill level that just isn't even half matched by my general bass knowledge.

..Wow, bit of a tangent eh :lol:

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Found some videos on Youtube, New Order playing 'Blue Monday' live(!) on Top of the Pops from 1983, and another of them performing 'Thieves Like Us' several years later. Man, Peter Hook is definitely a Bass Legend (though I still think his playing in Joy Division is somewhat overrated).

I think this guy deserves some respect, he did inspire me to learn the bass...

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Again, not technically stunning (and I don't think he wrote the basslines) but very melodic playing, held the songs together, provided ear-catching hooks.

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Sorry, got to do it like this:

Jazz guys-

Richard Davis

Cecil McBee

Doug Watkins

Ron Carter

Butch Warren

Charlie Haden

John Pattitucci

Jimmy Garrison (greatest bass soloist of all time)

What? No mention of Scott LaFaro?

ScottLaFaro.gif

One of the greatest jazz bassists in history, cruelly cut down in his prime. His work with Bill Evans is awe-inspiring.

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Paul Jackson is pretty awesome.

Laid down some killer grooves with Herbie, as you rightly pointed out.

Also did a sweet album with Mike Clark (the drummer from 'Flood' and 'Thrust') called 'The Funk Stops Here'.

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Stanley Clarke.

Another fusion bass master.

Introduced slapping to jazz fusion. Totally sick player, rocked the party on the Return to Forever albums as well his own solo material.

As a double bonus, he plays upright too (is his first instrument really, apart from cello) and is totally amazing (if not better) at that too.

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Juan Alderete.

One of the best contemporary bassists around today. Laid down some OBSCENE grooves with the Mars Volta. Double jointed thumbs (like Jaco Pastorius) also make him a bit of speed demon.

Him and Jon Theodore are up there in my favourite rhythm sections of all time.

Shame Theodore has left the band now.

;)

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Stanley Clarke.

Another fusion bass master.

Introduced slapping to jazz fusion. Totally sick player, rocked the party on the Return to Forever albums as well his own solo material.

As a double bonus, he plays upright too (is his first instrument really, apart from cello) and is totally amazing (if not better) at that too.

Yeah, I much prefer his earlier double bass work on LPs such as Gato's 'Bolivia' and 'Under Fire', and Joe Farrel's 'Moon Germs'.

I don't enjoy his more overt fusiony stuff. Actually, I have a problem with over-busy electric bassists in a similar way I have a problem with wanky guitarists. It's a fine line too often crossed with abandon.

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I dunno, I'm not overtly into self-indulgent soloing, but I'm not against soloing per se.

For instance, I can dig a John McLaughlin solo, but if Yngwie Malmsteen runs into my house and starts shredding in my face, I'd probably stab him in the face with a fork.

Multiple times. Until he was dead.

I know what you mean about his fusion stuff. Particularly the synths. His solo albums tread a fine line between killer fusion jams with soaring synths that blow your mind and cheesy shite that annoys you to the point of wanting to listen to something else.

There's a tendency with some bass soloists, such as Mark King, to turn solos into purely a technical showcase, and I find it boring. It's different with Jaco and Stanley Clarke for me though, when they solo it's more about musical expression and less about 'Check me out, I can play thirty billion notes a second!' sorta thing.

What do you think of Jaco's stuff?

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It might be what it was made for but surely the rules are for breaking, in music more than most things. I don't think there's anything wrong in swapping the roles of the instruments, provided it's done well enough.

Mind you, I'm not really talking about solos there. The majority of solos (on any instrument) can fuck off and die as far as I'm concerned.

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I dunno, I'm not overtly into self-indulgent soloing, but I'm not against soloing per se.

For instance, I can dig a John McLaughlin solo, but if Yngwie Malmsteen runs into my house and starts shredding in my face, I'd probably stab him in the face with a fork.

Multiple times. Until he was dead.

I know what you mean about his fusion stuff. Particularly the synths. His solo albums tread a fine line between killer fusion jams with soaring synths that blow your mind and cheesy shite that annoys you to the point of wanting to listen to something else.

There's a tendency with some bass soloists, such as Mark King, to turn solos into purely a technical showcase, and I find it boring. It's different with Jaco and Stanley Clarke for me though, when they solo it's more about musical expression and less about 'Check me out, I can play thirty billion notes a second!' sorta thing.

What do you think of Jaco's stuff?

I share your sentiments. Particularly regarding Mr Malmsteen.

I let Jaco sort of pass me by to be honest. He was obviously an incredible player and composer but I only ever got hold of his self-titled LP on Columbia (the one with the black and white portrait), which I never really got into.

I've heard him on some insane things that I've been shown by friends but have no idea which LPs they might be sitting on. Do you have any particular recs or favourites?

Also, have you heard much Trevor Dunn? These days he records a lot with John Zorn. He never fails to inspire me, he's a true master of any idiom. The last thing I heard of his was the recent Zorn 'Moonchild' album - brutal and brilliant as fuck. The passages of just him and Joey Baron are nuts.

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In my opinion, Bass solos go contrary to the very nature of the instrument, which is to lock in with the drums and hold the rythmn down.

Yeah, but the whole point of rules is to break them. It's boring to be all 'This instrument MUST be played like this, and this instrument MUST be played like this' because, to me, that flies in the face of what music (jazz in particular) is.

To Defy the Laws of Tradition and that.

Which, is actually the name of a Primus tune.

I let Jaco sort of pass me by to be honest. He was obviously an incredible player and composer but I only ever got hold of his self-titled LP on Columbia (the one with the black and white portrait), which I never really got into.

I've heard him on some insane things that I've been shown by friends but have no idea which LPs they might be sitting on. Do you have any particular recs or favourites?

He was at his sickest with Weather Report. He's on about half a dozen Weather Report albums, and they're all near-classics. Particularly 'Heavy Weather'.

Recently I've been listening to 'Weather Report: Live and Unreleased', which is a quality live album taken from numerous 70s shows. Jaco's not on all the tracks (Weather Report's line up fluctuated) but the ones he IS on, he's incredible.

He had an amazing feel for the bass, even though most younger bassists look up to him for his flashy fretless skills and busy fills and that, people tend to forget the fact that he had bags and bags and bags of groove.

Also, have you heard much Trevor Dunn? These days he records a lot with John Zorn. He never fails to inspire me, he's a true master of any idiom. The last thing I heard of his was the recent Zorn 'Moonchild' album - brutal and brilliant as fuck. The passages of just him and Joey Baron are nuts

Dunn's awesome. I've got a friend who's a massive fan of everything Zorn's ever recorded. I don't really own much of his material, but my buddy plays it constantly.

Apparently, Dunn tunes his bass B-E-A-D which is kind of cool.

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Textbook choices, but undeniable bass legends.

Even smackhead Andy.

o/\o
Rourke was briefly sacked from the Smiths over drugs abuse, resulting in a weekend prison sentence, which was posted on TV news. The brief dismissal of Rourke came in the form of a note left by Morrissey under the wind-screen wiper of his car; "Andy, you have left The Smiths. Good luck and goodbye, Morrissey".
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