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The Dark Knight

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It also occurred to me how much the main plot of TDK owes to The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

That's interesting. Hadn't considered that before. Will have to think on but you might have a point there:

'You either die a hero, or live long enough to see yourself become a villain'.

"When the legend becomes fact, print the legend."

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I’m not sure if this is the best place to post it, but thought some of you might be interested if you’re close to London.

Imax are bringing back their Batman all-nighter on the 26th March. Starting at 11:55pm on Saturday, they’ll be showing the 4 best Batman films, Tim Burton’s Batman & Batman Returns, followed by Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins & The Dark Knight.

I only heard of it yesterday and when I went to book tickets, almost all of the top middle row had been booked. So grab some tickets quickly if you’re prepared for 10 hours of Batman! Free Tea and Coffee as well. :)

http://www.bfi.org.uk/whatson/bfi_imax/coming_soon/now_booking/batman_allnighter_12a

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Jim Emerson has done a shot-by-shot video analysis of the chase sequence from The Dark Knight, explaining exactly why it's such an incoherent action scene: pointing out what continuity errors it makes in the relative positions of the different vehicles, and explaining what conventions about editing and visual grammar are broken with nearly every cut.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/archives/IN_THE_CUT_The_Dark_Knight_by_Christopher_Nolan/

Personally, crossing the line and being unsure of Harvey Dent's orientation inside the van didn't bother me - I wouldn't have found it disorientating if the positioning of the different vehicles had at least been consistent. His re-edited version of the Batmobile's approach does seem to work better than the one in the film (the original version is shown from 14m30s, his re-edit from 15m15s).

He's going to do two more videos analysing another two movie action sequences: one from last year's Salt, the other from Don Siegel's The Lineup (1958).

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The bat cycles approach to the shopping mall always bugged me just from seeing it in the trailer, i thought it may have been just the way it was edited for the trailer but no. That vid does a good job of showing what an incoherent mess the editing is in that scene and if i recall it was cut the old fasioned way splicing film together instead of using non-linear editing.

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Jim Emerson has done a shot-by-shot video analysis of the chase sequence from The Dark Knight, explaining exactly why it's such an incoherent action scene: pointing out what continuity errors it makes in the relative positions of the different vehicles, and explaining what conventions about editing and visual grammar are broken with nearly every cut.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/archives/IN_THE_CUT_The_Dark_Knight_by_Christopher_Nolan/

Personally, crossing the line and being unsure of Harvey Dent's orientation inside the van didn't bother me - I wouldn't have found it disorientating if the positioning of the different vehicles had at least been consistent. His re-edited version of the Batmobile's approach does seem to work better than the one in the film (the original version is shown from 14m30s, his re-edit from 15m15s).

He's going to do two more videos analysing another two movie action sequences: one from last year's Salt, the other from Don Siegel's The Lineup (1958).

Very informative. I honestly wouldn't have noticed anything except for maybe the batmobile's approach. Some of the stuff seems really minor though and I wouldn't trade the initial Joker shotgun scene for anything.

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He makes some good points, especially the direction of the truck falling into the river.

I think a bigger "what's happening?" moment for me would be the final scene with Dent, Gordon and Batman. It was a visual mess right until we get this oddly framed, super quick shot of Harvey "dead" on the floor below, it was so vague I just couldn't (and still don't as a result) believe he's dead.

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He makes some good points, especially the direction of the truck falling into the river.

I think a bigger "what's happening?" moment for me would be the final scene with Dent, Gordon and Batman. It was a visual mess right until we get this oddly framed, super quick shot of Harvey "dead" on the floor below, it was so vague I just couldn't (and still don't as a result) believe he's dead.

I think thats the point of that particular shot, its Halloween-esque without being "hey look, we're doing Halloween!"

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