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Danny Boyle - Sunshine

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I was asuming throughout the film that there was artificial gravity of some sort (other than centrifugal) onboard the ships, though why it would only kick in in the airlock when pressurised I have no idea.

The astronaut freezing solid after a few seconds exposure to space was also complete crap.

Did those two factors ruin your enjoyment of the film?

I only ask because those things cropped up in my head also, but i didn't think the film was any worse off for it.

I really really enjoyed it :ph34r:

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The astronaut freezing solid after a few seconds exposure to space was also complete crap.

What would actually have happened then? I have no idea about such things so I was willing to believe that was totally believable... in fact that little set piece was the highlight of the film.

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What would actually have happened then? I have no idea about such things so I was willing to believe that was totally believable... in fact that little set piece was the highlight of the film.

It was fantastic, and much more accurate than Event Horizon's take (it even had people exhaling to preserve their lungs, something 2001 got wrong), but you only lose heat through radiation when you're in a vacuum and that's a very slow process. That was only the science goof in the film that, as I was watching, I thought they didn't get away with - everything else was either absolutely correct, or necessarily changed to make the film work. However Poet's right to criticise the transit of Mercury, that was just silly, and the idea that flying into the sun would result in dramatically relativistic effects like "time becomes space" was way off. However the film was naturalistic enough to make it unbearably tense as there's obviously no deus ex machina waiting in the wings. I loved it, although I was completely strung out by the time they landed in that airlock. I actually wanted the film to be over then because I really couldn't take much more.

The lurch into slasher-pic mode was a bit of a downer. Brilliantly executed as far as cliches go, mind you, but the first half of the film was better for focussing on this insanely, murderously alien environment and the people in it, rather than introducing some crazy space guy. I realise he's still a human threat, but he wasn't like the existing crew who we got to see going a bit strange. Anyway, it got back on course after that.

Visually and acoustically, it's up there with the best. I honestly think it can stand next to 2001 in that regard, and it'll age very, very well. There damn well better be a soundtrack album. Are they going to show it in IMAX, ever? It'd be a terribly missed opportunity if they didn't. And I want a figurine of those space suits.

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No sign of the soundtrack anywhere... what gives?

Aha, looks like we have some kind of answer from the webmaster of the wonderous Sunshine blog site...

MUSIC QUESTIONS ANSWERED:

Loads of people are asking questions about the soundtrack etc. Unfortunately, everyone is on holiday right now until Tuesday so I can’t find out when it’s being released.

The name of the music in the trailer can be found on this site - click on trailer in the tag cloud to the left.

The songs in the end credits of the film are:

Here are the two songs from the end credits… :(

Underworld“Peggy Sussed” (River Run version)

and

I Am Kloot - “Avenue of Hope”

I thought the bit where they saw Mercury fly past the sun was handled brilliantly (especially with the soundtrack) - really looked lush and believable even if the speed of Mercury might of been scientifically inaccurate. I suppose that the science parts may of been stretched somewhat, especially near the end with the insane rotating cube (a link to the 2001 monolith perhaps?) and the wall of fire - but if you're going to go all surreal 2001-stylee, then science could well go out of the window. The thing is that both films did an extremely good job of presenting a believable spaceship environment.

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I’d be on the same page as Alex, I really loved it. I was hooked right from the start, the big swooping shot from the front of the shield then around it to the ship and the bomb was beautiful. I thought every big, external space shot was superb, I could have watched that shot of the sun for the whole film.

Fantastic film.

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Did those two factors ruin your enjoyment of the film?

I only ask because those things cropped up in my head also, but i didn't think the film was any worse off for it.

No, not at all - I was just noting some movie crap-o-science. The last part of the film was shit though. Should've kept it as pure sci-fi rather than some half-baked slasher flick (or at least had one of the Icarus 2 crew go mental rather than pitting them against third-degree-burns man).

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Saw this on Thursday night with a bunch of friends and we all loved it.

The slasher bits would have been better had they not already given it away in the second trailer ("computer, who is the fifth crew member? fifth crew member is unknown") but I can't fault that too much, it was entertaining all the same.

Watching Mercury move so fast had me thinking it was a bit silly but it wasn't enough to complain about. Overall the science seemed pretty accurate (physics has never been my strong point though) and in the places where it wasn't it was portrayed well enough that your average clueless punter would find it believable, certainly no more unrealistic than the uzi-that-has-a-thousand-bullet-mag syndrome that every action film suffers from these days and even that isn't enough to reduce the entertainment something provides.

And Cassie was cute.

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The science niggle that sticks in my mind is the captain getting washed away by a giant wave of fire. What is fire doing out in space? Shouldn't it just have been intense light and the captain getting toasted by insane amounts of radiation?

And would stuff like the comms array and the frozen dude really explode into flames just for being in the glare of the sun, out in deep space? Surely space is still a freezing vacuum that far away from a star, albeit full of deadly radiation?

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I think I'm very easily pleased because I enjoyed this movie a lot. I agree it was a bit long and the final act was a bit daft but well, I enjoyed the stories and the way it was shot.

The one thing that I thought was funny was the frequent parallels with 2001: A Space Odyssey. I was half expecting the

computer to go nuts and open the blinds or something

. The characters were pretty one dimensional too and whatever philosophical (sp) point Boyle was trying to make seems muddled but...

...I still liked it.

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The science niggle that sticks in my mind is the captain getting washed away by a giant wave of fire. What is fire doing out in space? Shouldn't it just have been intense light and the captain getting toasted by insane amounts of radiation?

And would stuff like the comms array and the frozen dude really explode into flames just for being in the glare of the sun, out in deep space? Surely space is still a freezing vacuum that far away from a star, albeit full of deadly radiation?

The very outer part of the sun is several million Kelvin, with a constant flux of solar wind racing out. So I assume that was what was burning everything away into the distance. I'm not sure if the magnitude of the effect is right, though, and whether it was correct for their distance from the sun. (Interestingly the sun itself is only a few thousand kelvin).

I expect the Bad Astronomer will review it once the film hits the US.

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I quite enjoyed it on account of some of the visuals and the sound, and the mere fact that it wasn't an adaptation of a comic book, for a change.

But I have to agree with Poet's general thrust: it was a disappointment. The basic premise was simple, but promising. The cast were fine, given what they had to work with. It's also fine that the film ripped off many of the more cerebral / atmospheric Sci-Fi works of the last half century, and I'm all for tributes to the greats. But in this case, there were too many films and ideas competing for Boyle's love, and none of the ideas that fuelled those films - and on which each one dwelt, played with and expanded - could survive the others. Nothing was realised, everything just fell away as the next reference came along. The trancendentalism of 2001 was hinted at, but went nowhere. The stalker/thriller shock of Alien was clumsily shoehorned in and limply realised. Even Event Horizon was better, as it at least focussed enough on the one (ghost ship) concept to make it grab your attention. Dark Star - check. But wait - hydroponics in space! Let's switch to some other references for a bit...and, please, don't even mention Solaris.

For all the dazzle of the film, it turned out to be not so bright after all. In fact, compared to the works from which it stole/borrowed, it turned out under all that glossy makeup to be a little bit...dim. Whilst that might be fine for an Arnie actioner or a Lucas comic, for a film that set itself up to be a return to the Sci Fi of ideas and exploration this one just ticked a few boxes and went home to Florida like a fat American tourist who's seen the world after a week's vacation to the Great Capitals.

Enjoy it if you will, but this potboiler was not only less than the sum of its parts, each of those parts was actually better on its own.

In summary: incoherent, but with nice makeup.

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(or at least had one of the Icarus 2 crew go mental rather than pitting them against third-degree-burns man).

I like to think that his strength comes from Earth's yellow sun.

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The main character in the film wasn't in the cast though. It was the sun.

Are you joking? That sounds like something from a film review written by a 14-year-old whose parents have been teaching him French since he was 3.

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Seriously. The sun? It wasn't a character, it was the chief environmental threat. So the main character in Jaws is the shark, is it? The main character in Ice Cold In Alex is the desert? Backdraft: fire?

Characters have motives, actions, and arcs. You're just being pretentious.

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Are you joking? That sounds like something from a film review written by a 14-year-old whose parents have been teaching him French since he was 3.

It was clear to me throughout that the older-than-history concept of the sun as god (and God) was pretty central. Simaltaneously the life-giving, all-providing being that brought life as we know it into existence, and a vengeful, all-powerful destroyer that does not permit any to look upon it, lest they go mad. It really was probably the central charactter within the film, and a damned sight more interesting than Boo-Hoo-Emotional-Bint, OMG I Love Teh Plants and Utter Pussy That Is Somehow Second In Command.

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Seriously. The sun? It wasn't a character, it was the chief environmental threat. So the main character in Jaws is the shark, is it? The main character in Ice Cold In Alex is the desert? Backdraft: fire?

Characters have motives, actions, and arcs. You're just being pretentious.

And you're just being rude.

The Sun is 'shown' as being the face of God who, correct me if I'm wrong, is a sentient being. It exerts influence over the characters psychologically rather than just being a big physical lump of something.

And of course the main character in Jaws was the shark, that's why it's called 'Jaws' and not 'Police Chief Brody Adventures'.

Disagree all you like but don't be a cock about it.

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It was clear to me throughout that the older-than-history concept of the sun as god (and God) was pretty central. Simaltaneously the life-giving, all-providing being that brought life as we know it into existence, and a vengeful, all-powerful destroyer that does not permit any to look upon it, lest they go mad. It really was probably the central charactter within the film,

Yeah, that's kind of what I meant.

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Er... I didn't think that the captain of Icarus 1 was quite human anymore. The whole camerawork where he just kind of jump-cut from place to place bears that out, surely. He certainly didn't move like a human. Also, he was far too frazzled to have possibly survived as he was.

Was it ever actually spelt out why the crew of the Icarus abandoned their quest? I thought it was left pretty ambiguous. Also, when the fire stopped at Cillian Murphy's face allowing him to touch the Sun at the end of the film, I thought all this implied much more than "Captain goes mad, becomes slasher."

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Just back from seeing it. Enjoyed it a lot, although not so much the editing and blurry smeary effects whenever a certain character was on screen in the last quarter (or however long it was). Found my heart pumping in bits and I'm still not quite settled down.

Right at the start I questioned the wisdom of having a window in the shield. I was thinking of it from a more practical standpoint, but it turns out to have been pretty much at the root of what went wrong in the end.

Nobody making it home wasn't a surprise either. I went in expecting anyone alive by the end to be flying the ship into the sun to make the mission successful. So I suppose that much was predictable.

Also, by the end I kept thinking of jokes from my youth about an Irishman landing on the Sun and Murphy doing just that in the movie :(

But, yeah, liked it and I'm looking forward to it being released on Blu-ray.

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Er... I didn't think that the captain of Icarus 1 was quite human anymore. The whole camerawork where he just kind of jump-cut from place to place bears that out, surely. He certainly didn't move like a human. Also, he was far too frazzled to have possibly survived as he was.

Was it ever actually spelt out why the crew of the Icarus abandoned their quest? I thought it was left pretty ambiguous. Also, when the fire stopped at Cillian Murphy's face allowing him to touch the Sun at the end of the film, I thought all this implied much more than "Captain goes mad, becomes slasher."

It seems like the Captain of the icarus went mental looking at the sun, fried his crew and sat around dribbling for 7 years before Cappa and co turned up.

The Captain says that during his chats with God, God told him that he wanted everyone to go to heaven, so the Captain sabotaged the mission (and his shipmates) before setting off a distress signal incase people on Earth tried to give it another shot.

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