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Hotel Dusk: Room 215

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I think it's when you're saying goodbye to everyone that you can get in there.

Just tried that. Still locked.

I've saved it there, though, so I can avoid leaving and see if I missed something.

EDIT: Do I need to nick the key?

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I do like this in small bursts.

However a couple of days ago I had three attempts at the

hide the 'hot' items

which results in game over/reload when you fail and I haven't been back since. Will give it another go tonight, possibly...

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After loving Another Code, I'm a little disappointed with this. I felt that Another Code struck a good balance between its puzzles and the story it told, with both aspects being really rather good. Playing Hotel Dusk on the other hand is like reading a book, but with often arbitrary puzzles and tedious wandering interrupting you after every page. Worse still, I've been stuck on a few occasions purely because I couldn't figure out what the game wanted me to do at the time, not because I was trying to suss out a puzzle. At no point have I felt like I was truly in control and making a difference in the world, which kind of defeats the object of it being a game.

It does look lovely though, which is something.

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I completed it the second time. Made bugger all difference, I couldn't get into 'that' room, and I didn't know what to do with the 'thing' I got from the vending machine.

Although right at the end when 'that person' turns up at the hotel was a nice touch, but left a lot unexplained. I can't be arsed to play it again.

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OH FFS!

I took your hints wandered about some more only to give in and check gamefaqs

fucking chalk dust on the chalk board!

You could have also used the flour in the kitchen.

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Just played my first 30 minutes of this last night and it's looking very promising. Art style is great (of course), and unlike some people, I'm enjoying the dialogue. It's like a japanese take on what hard-bitten yanks talk like. he bit where the hotel owner is telling you that room 215 has the ability to make wishes come true, and Kyle says something like "Nice story, pops" - :)

Notebook feature is marvellous, and the whole package seems very polished. Just hoping I don't run into the frustrations some on here are experiencing. After being disappointed with Contact, I hope this is the DS game with at least some depth that I've been looking for.

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I'm having some trouble working out what on earth to do with this game - and I'm only at the start. seems very obscure in what to do and not as focused as Another Code.

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There is no depth whatsoever. Sorry. :lol:

Enjoy the story, though. It's a pager-turner (in a manner of speaking).

Exactly. You will get the most out of it if you pause before the end and figure it out yourself. Its hardly a game in fact.

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I'm having some trouble working out what on earth to do with this game - and I'm only at the start. seems very obscure in what to do and not as focused as Another Code.

This happened to me too. I got stuck after the initial conversations and couldn't remembr what I was supposed to be doing.

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Look out everyone - this is tedious, badly written wank.

I really can't understand how people's expectations can be so low that, while everyone admits that it's basically worthless as an adventure game - with howlers like not being able to pick up an object until the game is ready for you to use it - people say they enjoyed it for the "story".

Not only does it do that irritating thing of printing out the dialogue letter by letter, as if the paraliterate audience they have in mind might be overwhelmed by the presentation of a whole two lines of text all at once, but the writing is gash.

All the characters so far seem completely cliched - they do speak in individual voices, but the characterisation is no more sophisticated than e.g. the old woman calling you "dear". The dialogue is stilted and never uses one line of dialogue when six will do. It's needlessly boring.

The interface and presentation is nice, but there is no game here. Certainly not one worth twenty quid.

Are competently written adventure games a lost art, like the skills of mediaeval stonemasons or the painting techniques of the Great Masters? No - there are some great writers of old school interactive fiction: check out Book and Volume (which manages to be entertaining despite having annoyingly arbitrary time-limited "deaths") or anything by Emily Short.

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I'm half-way through Chapter 5 now, and have been totally immersed in it. It is rare that a game has a story this good. Yeah, there are a few slight niggles (like some grammar, and repetition), but so far I've loved every second of it and am dying to find out what happens next.

Surely the mark of a good game is that you keep wanting to play it? If so, then Hotel Dusk wins.

I've got Game Over three times, and each time I've realised it was going to happen, I just wasn't sure what to do to stop it. And the fact that after Game Over you get a flashback of the "clue" as to why it's going to be Game Over shows you that there are no "sudden deaths".

I wish people would stop trying to force that these "non-standard" DS games must adhere to "normal game rules", and then complain when they don't.

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I'm quite enjoying this - although so far it's more reading than doing. I also enjoyed another code though...

The conversations do seem a bit unneccessarily long, and nothing has happened so far - it's more an interactive story than a game... and should be advertised as such. Touch Generations folks would probably enjoy it more if they approached it in that way.

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I'm quite enjoying this - although so far it's more reading than doing. I also enjoyed another code though...

The conversations do seem a bit unneccessarily long, and nothing has happened so far - it's more an interactive story than a game... and should be advertised as such. Touch Generations folks would probably enjoy it more if they approached it in that way.

Thats absolutely the right way to approach it.

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I wish people would stop trying to force that these "non-standard" DS games must adhere to "normal game rules", and then complain when they don't.

It's fundamentally an adventure game, and it should avoid doing things that would have been a cause for derision in a point 'n' clicker 10 years ago.

Even if you want to class it as an "interactive story", then it should at least have decent dialogue.

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I think I'm done with this. I've been putting off going back to it like I would a particularly dull piece of homework.

That bloke who gave it 10/10 on EGM was very, very wrong. I really want interactive fiction / adventure games / non-games on the DS, so I really wanted to like Hotel Dusk but I can't overlook the substandard execution. People who like books will hate it. People who like games will hate it. People who liked reading scheme comprehension tests at school won't find any challenge here. It's ideal for slow readers with a great deal of patience who don't mind looking stuff up on gamefaqs.

I'm still vaguely curious to find out how the story turned out.

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I've got Game Over three times, and each time I've realised it was going to happen, I just wasn't sure what to do to stop it. And the fact that after Game Over you get a flashback of the "clue" as to why it's going to be Game Over shows you that there are no "sudden deaths".

I'm not sure if this is in reply to me - my complaint about arbitrary deaths was in relation to Book and Volume, not Hotel Dusk.

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I think i'm near the end of this

Got knocked out, woke up in the cellar then trapped in the airtight room with the computer.

but i don't know if i enjoyed it, it passes the time and has kept me up later in bed than i would've liked.

But it's about time a real writer got involved in a game like this, as it's really just an interactive novel. I know Stephen King isn't a litary genius but he does try new things, and i wish some dev would approach him or someone else(Elmore Lenoard, James Ellroy) to write the story for a game like this. The DS is the perfect system to implement the Interactive novel.

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People who like books will hate it. People who like games will hate it. People who liked reading scheme comprehension tests at school won't find any challenge here. It's ideal for slow readers with a great deal of patience who don't mind looking stuff up on gamefaqs.

My thoughts exactly. Having finished this over the weekend (which apparently took me close to 30 hours, although I'm sure I left it paused for a fair amount of that) I honestly wish I hadn't bothered. The individual storylines do intertwine in quite a nice way towards the end but absolutely nothing is resolved and, taken as a book, it's a meandering ham-fisted affair at best.

As an adventure game, it's barley worth a mention. The puzzles are either incredibly simple or unnecessarily obtuse, and the more 'videogamey' elements

(such as bowling in the hallway with Louie)

simply don't work. It's an intriguing experience and the tiny setting is quite a bold move. I do like the art, but the whole thing is too confused and, ultimately, pointless for me to recommend it to anyone.

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I thought there was some nice uses of the DS

the shutting of it's lid to flip the jigsaw

for example was a good thinking out of the box mechanic by Cing.

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People who like books will hate it. People who like games will hate it.

I like both, and love it.

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I'm quite enjoying this - although so far it's more reading than doing. I also enjoyed another code though...

The conversations do seem a bit unneccessarily long, and nothing has happened so far - it's more an interactive story than a game... and should be advertised as such. Touch Generations folks would probably enjoy it more if they approached it in that way.

It's too 'gamey' for them. Too many rules that make no sense.

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I think I'm done with this. I've been putting off going back to it like I would a particularly dull piece of homework.

That bloke who gave it 10/10 on EGM was very, very wrong. I really want interactive fiction / adventure games / non-games on the DS, so I really wanted to like Hotel Dusk but I can't overlook the substandard execution. People who like books will hate it. People who like games will hate it. People who liked reading scheme comprehension tests at school won't find any challenge here. It's ideal for slow readers with a great deal of patience who don't mind looking stuff up on gamefaqs.

I'm still vaguely curious to find out how the story turned out.

Dunning Smith kidnaps you, Louie, Rosa and Mila and guns you all down in the hotel's cellar.

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Dunning Smith kidnaps you, Louie, Rosa and Mila and guns you all down in the hotel's cellar.

which is where he had buried the corpses of all the missing folk

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