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The Matrix in High Definition


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Don't get me wrong, I've got quite a few HD films - and the whole series of Band of Brothers - at the moment I'm still collecting DVDs but I do try and get the old film that I think would be just that little bit special in HD.

The Matrix has just blown me away more than most - skipped through to watch the best scenes - the lobby, with all the plaster and tiles flying around and the bit where Neo and Trinity get the chopper and shoot the shit out of the agents with that minigun. It all looks so damn good on my 32" Sammy.

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Sin City on that site looks well tasty, I've still not seen it since I've been waiting for a decent DVD release over here (or a price drop for the extended R1 version). Fuck it, I'll just watch download it from there in the meantime.

Cheers for the link :D

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Sin City is excellent in HD, as are all of the Pixars films and the few Disney films that have cropped up.

I want Terminator 2 though :) I can't wait for a HD-DVD/Blu-Ray release of that. 1080 lines of guns, cars, cyborgs and mimetic-poly-alloys ;)

How the...?

Wha? :D

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Everything that's filmed, as in on a reel is high definition by it's nature. Each frame just needs scanning (or however they do it) at a higher resolution.

Which means we'll all be buying our old films again!

As for files size, the Matrix one is 3.5gb ish I think, there's a 32.4GB 1080i extended version of Return of the King out there though. Most are under 4.7GB purely so they can be burnt on a DVD.

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Also, how are these films HD? Was the resolution they were originally shot in HD or have they been upscaled or what? And what's the resolution of a cinema screen? Also, how big are the files?

no doubt somone will correct me on everything I am about to say, but in a nutshell.

and the films are shot on, wait for it...film, so it does not have a resolution as such, the res comes into it when it is scanned for video or DVD, so to get a higher res copy of the original film you just rescan at HD res.

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If you wanna buy HD films you might as well get the ones that will take full advantage of the HD, Matrix was a fantastic choice and would love to see that and yeah Terminator 2 would look fantastic.

For sure - I wouldn't replace my entire DVD collection with (insert winning format here)'s, but I would choose one or two films that have special effects that HD would add to. I wouldn't go and re-buy The Blair Witch Project for example in HD and I doubt many people would.

No "because the film is shit" jokes please!

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Also, how are these films HD? Was the resolution they were originally shot in HD or have they been upscaled or what? And what's the resolution of a cinema screen? Also, how big are the files?

Pretty much all recent films (and most old ones) will have been shot on film that is far more 'HD' than HD. 720p or whatever is still going to be losing a fair bit of information. AFAIK, the resolution of a good, modern 35mm film is 4096 x 3112 so you can see there's still a pretty big gap there, not that much of that lost information is necessary to us though really.

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For all those people pointing out that films are shot on film... surely any modern movie (The Matrix and Return of the King have been mentioned in this thread) which contains digital special effects, will have had the film stock scanned in at a particular resolution at some point fairly early in the production process, before the special effects were added. Presumably from that point onwards, the 'master' copy of the film is a digital file which only exists at a certain maximum resolution, so the question is quite valid. What resolution are modern, special effects, movies made at?

(I guess its theoretically possible to rescan the original Return of the King film stock in at any resolution, and re render the digital special effects at the new resolution and recreate the whole movie at any res, but I doubt that is practical, although its probably more practical to re-render a Pixar movie at any new resolution which comes along.)

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I went to see the second Matrix film in Imax a few years ago, which I assume is similar (or greater, in fact) in terms of resolution to HD; I doubt it would have been even vaguely profitable to re-render the film's special effects at super-high resolution for the Imax relief, so I would guess that the CGI would have been rendered at the same level of detail as the raw footage. I would hazard a guess that the special effects would need to be at the same res as the filmed elements, as they wouldn't mesh too well otherwise. Complete speculation on my part, obviously.

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For all those people pointing out that films are shot on film... surely any modern movie (The Matrix and Return of the King have been mentioned in this thread) which contains digital special effects, will have had the film stock scanned in at a particular resolution at some point fairly early in the production process, before the special effects were added. Presumably from that point onwards, the 'master' copy of the film is a digital file which only exists at a certain maximum resolution, so the question is quite valid. What resolution are modern, special effects, movies made at?

(I guess its theoretically possible to rescan the original Return of the King film stock in at any resolution, and re render the digital special effects at the new resolution and recreate the whole movie at any res, but I doubt that is practical, although its probably more practical to re-render a Pixar movie at any new resolution which comes along.)

I'd guess that the master is either max or very high resolution, they wouldn't arse around with making too many - just downsample the highest they have. Wikipedia says that resolutions for digital cinema can be either 2048x1080 or 4096x2160.

When I was in New York a couple of years ago I watch an IMAX version of Reloaded, that was quite nice too.

Edit: What he said.

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When I was in New York a couple of years ago I watch an IMAX version of Reloaded, that was quite nice too.

It really showed up the CGI though. Especially when the pores on Lawrence Fishbourne's face are bigger than your head but the CGI face is as smooth and featureless as a piece of shit CGI.

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As for files size, the Matrix one is 3.5gb ish I think

Wha? :P The one I have is about 12GB, and I wouldn't really go for a film in Hi-Def that's smaller than that, really. I guess that's DIVX HD, or something.

Also, I've heard (i.e. it could be bullpoop) that the maximum resolution a film frame can be scanned in is around 10 megapixel- 1080 video is about 2 megapixel.

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Wha? :P The one I have is about 12GB, and I wouldn't really go for a film in Hi-Def that's smaller than that, really.

The Sin City I downloaded from there was about 4.5gb and looks waaaaay better than any other HD trailers or whatever that I've seen. Thought it was weird that it should fit on a DVD and look so good.

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Wha? :P The one I have is about 12GB, and I wouldn't really go for a film in Hi-Def that's smaller than that, really. I guess that's DIVX HD, or something.

Also, I've heard (i.e. it could be bullpoop) that the maximum resolution a film frame can be scanned in is around 10 megapixel- 1080 video is about 2 megapixel.

Yeah, it is a DIVX rip - I would have got bigger if I could but it was the only one I found. 12GB of guns. Yum!

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