Jump to content

The Formula 1 Thread


Nick_L
 Share

Recommended Posts

Just saw this on catchup. Pretty much the opposite of China, a great first half tapered off into a dull, settled latter half. Well done to Kimi and Grosjean, shame it was ruined by that finger. Hoorah Paul Di Resta as well!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re: the Rosberg incidents, I don't know why he's being painted as the bad guy, because he didn't do anything wrong. The rules state that you can't crowd a car and that you can only make 1 move to defend... Rosberg didn't crowd Hamilton because he was behind him, not even half a car's length to the side. Having said that, this is one of the ambiguities that the rules need to clarify on - when does it stop being a defensive move and start being crowding? Halfway along side? When the car behind has a wing to the back tyres of the car in front? There's no way the car in front would be able to tell with the latter.

I guess everyone saw it as extreme because of the sudden change of direction Rosberg made, coupled with Hamilton taking the rallying route. But the key thing here is that he wasn't forced to - unlike Schumacher and Barrichello in Hungary a couple of years ago, who were definitely side by side - Barry had nowhere to go. Lewis here could have backed off - which he would've done if there was no runoff area - before they were side by side he (still behind Rosberg) saw that Nico was making his intentions clear on which way he was going - THAT was his 1 move. He could've sold him the dummy and went the other side, or just backed off.  Instead he mashed his foot down and took to the offtrack. Just because the one behind has a better runoff/is gaining, shouldn't translate to the guy in front leaving the door open.

But the FIA really need to include more details on rules regarding such incidents. What should be the relative car distance before it becomes crowding, and also what can constitute the 1 move (we already know you can make the 1 move PLUS moving back onto the braking line as long as you give a car's width to the car outside) - but is 1 sudden move from one side of the track to the other just as valid as 1 slow, sweeping move? Or 1 move that starts off like a hard turn but tapers off smoothly? I saw Kobayashi do the latter whilst defending from Alonso.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rosberg did the same move at the exact same point at least three times, it was deliberate and calculated in all three occurrences. He knew exactly what he was doing and got away with it. If thee was an incident involving any of the cars, I'm not sure he would have gotten away with it. So far the stewards seem to be very lenient compared to last year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What would be helpful is the T cam view of Lewis and Alonso as they were approaching Rosberg. The far view squishes the perspective quite a bit.

Also lol at Kimi's interview with Natalie afterwards re: front wing damage

'yeah I was just looking at something else and I didn't notice the Ferrari in front... I saw some piece flying off. But it doesn't matter'

:D

What is amazing, 19 points covering the top 7.

Bahrain-Formula-One-Grand-006.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did watch the race. I don't feel great about it. If I had missed it then I wouldn't have watched any highlights or anything, probably would have downloaded it or something. Just, personal circumstances kind of lead to it, I suppose.

I'm still on the fence as to whether it should have gone ahead. I don't think you can have a hard and fast rule on how much sport should be dictated by politics. Each case is different, and this was different to, say, the England cricket team going to play in South Africa for example (when the South African government wouldn't allow one of our players to play because he was black..? Or something? I don't remember much about it...).

It seems to me the most important factor was how much this grand prix was an endorsement of the Bahrain monarchy/government/regime. And how much it was intended to be used to persuade the world that they had made progress since last year as a nation. But besides that, there's the fact that I don't think it worked in the slightest.

The way it was handled by Ecclestone/Todd and the FIA has left a very bad taste in my mouth. It seems perfectly clear that they wanted to shun all responsibility and manipulate the situation as much to their own ends as possible. Ecclestone's question "If we cancelled the race, would that solve the problems in the country?" in a BBC interview sums it up really. It highlights all in one sentence his lack of understanding of his position and the responsibility of that position, knowing or otherwise. It's virtually an irrelevant question. A far more relevant one would be, maybe, "If we cancelled the race, might that help in some small way? Might that save a few lives, and improve countless lives in the future?"

The phrase "with great power comes great responsibility" keeps going around in my head. I know it's clichéd now, but I think it's very true. If you are in a position of power such as Mr Ecclestone is, then you should act as responsibly as you can in accordance with that power. It seems he does not share this view. But then, I watched the race, and will watch future races. And am therefore endorsing the product to an extent. So maybe I'm not much better. But I'd like to think in his position I would've acted very differently.

That said, I think some positives have come from forging ahead with the race. It did shine a light on the country and the politics and the humanitarian issues. I know personally I would not have read anywhere near as much about Bahrain, and would not be as informed about the issues as I am now had it been cancelled a month ago, for example. And I think that would be the same for many people. And I think this is important, and not just an excuse to get to see a grand prix. It really has alerted the world to the problems in that country in a way cancelling the race would not have.

It seems that there are a lot of conflicting views of the state of the country, however. I read a good piece in The Times at lunchtime by Kevin Eason who had been around the country and heard many tales of beatings, teargass, protesters being shot, and so forth. He describes how his guide and traslator for his time there was beaten and ended up in hospital surrounded by armed guards for taking part in the protests on the Friday whilst he was sipping cocktails in Manama about three miles away. And I think this is where some confusion has arisen. Lots of people saying they didn't see or witness any violence or trouble does not mean that it isn't going on. Ecclestone has not been impressed with his journalism; when Eason put to the prince of Bahrain that "I don't want to come back next year if the rioting is still ongoing", Ecclestone fingered his F1 journalist pass and said, "I wouldn't worry about that, you won't be here next year anyway"... hmmm. Silencing people who don't agree with or conform to your dictatorship? No wonder he gets on so well with the Crown Prince...

There are also reports coming from Channel 4 news (@bendepear) that their team was arrested and deported, "Team arrested, surrounded by masked men and the driver assaulted taken away separately, last seen bleeding from his arms and we [very] concerned." "Our team has been released in Bahrain but our equipment has been kept and we remain extremely worried about Dr Alia and the driver". You don't have to try very hard to read some pretty depressing stuff about Bahrain.

If I were any of the guys on the podium, I'd have felt extremely conflicted and probably a bit sick about shaking the Crown Prince's hand when picking up a trophy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Channel 4 team did not have accreditation or documentation to allow them to film in Bahrain. They were there as tourists and tried to film the protests illegally. I'm not saying it's right they were arrested and deported, just pointing out the facts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Channel 4 team did not have accreditation or documentation to allow them to film in Bahrain. They were there as tourists and tried to film the protests illegally. I'm not saying it's right they were arrested and deported, just pointing out the facts.

The very fact you need accreditation or documentation to film should be a red flag in itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't need "accreditation" to take photos in London (Although someone should probably tell some of London's policemen that). You shouldn't need it in Manama either. Any government that feels the need to control what people see of the country should be treated with suspicion and a pathetic whitewash like that Saward article is no justification.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't need "accreditation" to take photos in London (Although someone should probably tell some of London's policemen that). You shouldn't need it in Manama either. Any government that feels the need to control what people see of the country should be treated with suspicion and a pathetic whitewash like that Saward article is no justification.

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/visas-immigration/visiting/business/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed. The USA requires you to get the appropriate visa too (the waiver form you can sign as a tourist very specifically says you can't "represent the foreign media" under it; I've heard tales of music magazine journalists getting deported because they've tried to get into America on a tourist visa when going to interview a band, and an eagle-eyed customs border guard has noticed Universal Records or whoever has paid for the plane ticket ). I'd be surprised if many countries don't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Jon Snow was saying last night that basically Bahrain granted them journalist visas except for the two weeks covering the GP.

He mentioned that the BBC and CNN were granted visas. (Presumably Sky must've been too!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a pathetic whitewash like that Saward article is no justification.

Fancy elaborating on that? (genuine request rather than provocative statement, I am still finding all the differing views very interesting)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He was known to the regime. He was invited there by the Crown Prince. There's no reason to believe he was allowed to talk to anyone they didn't want him to talk to.

At no point does he appear to have asked "So why did you order the shooting of doctors trying to help people you shot? Why did you imprison 15 of them? Why did you conduct a supposedly independent review, say you agreed with it but self evidently done absolutely nothing?"

It's an opportunity spurned and he's a bad journalist for doing so. As he says he's there for the F1, only interested in the F1 and anything he experience or said was clouded by a massive PR campaign aimed at that media.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But plenty of people did manage to talk to people the regime didn't want them to. That seems besides the point. It's not a balanced account of how the entire weekend went, or a thorough analysis of the whole situation. It's just one person's account. But I still thought it was interesting to get the views of people who were non-activists, and I don't think that should be dismissed or discounted flippantly. It's worth remembering that, like we've seen in this country, activists, protestors and "the opposition" aren't always wholly on the side of good, just as governments and people in charge aren't always wholly evil.

(note: I'm not saying that this is the case in Bahrain at all, I'm just saying it's worthwhile hearing different views)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a thought. Lots of F1 media types go to a country with questionable human rights issues and ... get this .... write about F1.

Who would have thought it!!!?!?!

What do you want them to do. Write stinging attacks on the government. spend the weekend looking for disaffected youths or Islamic extremists whipping up a storm in sunni towns.

Anyway, I've had enough of this. If you want to talk politics, take it to the politcs thread. This is for Motor sport and Formula one mostly. Not "name your 5 most hated despotic leaders" thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.