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When Modding Goes Wrong


hobo
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I'm guessing that black stuff is plastic of some sort (it must be something non-conductive or the console wouldn't be working).

Looks like he's tried to connect some fine wire (blue bit) bridging two solder points, and somehow melted some plastic (black blob) all over the points inbetween and beyond. He was probably using a normal soldering iron or something similarly retarded.

Actually, looking closer, he's destroyed one of the smaller chips on the board, which is probably what all the black shit it; the plastioc casing on the chip.

How on earth does that still work?!

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I'd just like to say, recently dealt with Yod@, and he is indeed a man to be trusted with this kind of thing. Very efficient and professional.

As for that pic... How in the hell did that guy melt the chip? He must have left the soldering iron lying on it for ages. I've soldered a bit (Not Xboxs though), the actual heated bit only melts that solder wire quickly.

Everything else takes bloody ages. When I first got into it, I thought I'd burn a hole into a MD to run a cable through. It took FOREVER to melt a small hole using the iron.

Those things aren't as dangerous as you'd think. I have no idea how that pic could happen.

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I used to do PS1s quite a bit. Attempted to do a PSOne which was so fiddly that i managed to unsolder a chip right off the board. Had to buy a new PSOne for the chap and get the broken one repaired professionally. I stopped chipping after that.

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I messed up a PSOne pretty badly too. Managed to get the sticker back on the back something like convincingly and get the girlfriend of the time to take it back to Gamestation and flutter her eyelashes until the guy swapped it for a new one.

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Good grief! How is that even possible? I've been slightly careless with the soldering iron in the past end ended up clipping a chip leaving a slight melt mark, but I can't for the life of me work out what could have happened to it - it can't be the chip casing as there simply isn't enough material there. Even if it is still working, I think d0 is nicely covered there so you can kiss any chance of modding that thing without a new mobo goodbye...

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Xbox motherboards usualy come with a signature like that from the factory (must be part of the factory QA check).

Not sure whats happened, looks like he might have applied some plastic coating over the D0 point (after soldering). If the chip was damaged then it would not boot.

Not all is lost as there is an alternative D0 point on the bottom side of the motherboard and the TSOP points can be reached from there too.

I have seen much much worse then this trust me ;)

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I'm about to find out what revision my sept '04 crystal is. but let's face it, it's gonna be a 1.6 n'est pas?

I'm liking the replacement front panel, you know, the one with the LCD display? ;)

I've got that on my plain black 1.6 Xbox. It's a nice little touch when using it with XBMC.

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Not all is lost as there is an alternative D0 point on the bottom side of the motherboard

You're right, I always forget that. Just a few weeks ago I got a botched mod in to repair for a friend where the the d0 point had been taken off the board. It was only after scraping the trace coating leading to d0 and soldering onto that when I remebered that it could have been so much easier! <_<

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Not all is lost as there is an alternative D0 point on the bottom side of the motherboard and the TSOP points can be reached from there too.

I have seen much much worse then this trust me <_<

The bottom of the board is far worse than that. The underside D0 point and the pad beside it have both been pulled off the board, and two of the pin header connections have been damaged as well.

The black stuff has been used as some sort of "glue", and caused no end of problems for me.

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Where can I get a LCD thing from for my xbox?

A replacement control panel with an LCD screen fitted? www.baldbouncer.co.uk sells them. You'll need an X3 chip to use the screen though.

I'm about to find out what revision my sept '04 crystal is. but let's face it, it's gonna be a 1.6 n'est pas?
Yeah, that'll be a v1.6.
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Guest Glimmer

Interesting thread here (especially as I'm new to the modding scene and have been trying it out on xboxs recently).

The black stuff is almost like something from LOST. ;)

I have a couple of questions for Yoda - when you took this xbox apart, were there obvious signs of tinkering that had gone on and if so, what?

Also, what do you think the previous modder had specifically attempted to do? Or could the damage be potentially linked to something heating up/melting over a period of time through shoddy maintainance?

Lastly, could this black stuff be anyway linked the infamous 'xbox blowing up' incidents that we all heard about in recent times?

Ok, that's more then a couple of questions, but you get my drift and nice one if you get around to answering them.

Cheers.

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Guest Glimmer

Hah. What do you mean? Are you inferring that I'm Doktor Moriarity or something?

But no, I can assure you that I've never personally seen anything like that before on an xbox motherboard and neither do I wish to.

I would, however be interested in finding out the hypothesis for what may have caused such an issue.

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I have a couple of questions for Yoda - when you took this xbox apart, were there obvious signs of tinkering that had gone on and if so, what?
Hi Glimmer. The pic at the start of the thread is what I found. I was told that the Xbox (never opened before - with security seals intact) had been given to someone else for modding, who then returned it several weeks later saying that it couldn't be modded, and that nothing whatsoever had been done to the Xbox. As soon as I opened it up (security seals were broken when I received it) I could see that wasn't true.
Also, what do you think the previous modder had specifically attempted to do? Or could the damage be potentially linked to something heating up/melting over a period of time through shoddy maintainance?

No idea. Just looks like a botched mod attempt to me. I've never seen a brand new retail Xbox shipped in such a condition, so someone else must have damaged the traces on the board.

Lastly, could this black stuff be anyway linked the infamous 'xbox blowing up' incidents that we all heard about in recent times?

Nope. Those are PSU problems.

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it's hard to tell from the quality of the picture, but that black stuff reminds me of the epoxy that mattel used to use to encase their intellivision cartridge chips with to help disapate the heat (as well as keep people from messing with anything on the board).

it's possible that it's just a big pool of [black] hot glue from a glue-gun (that a lot of the ps2 modders use to tack the wires in place), but as to why and how he did what he did is beyond me.

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I remember someone writing in to a technology magazine's "helpdesk" thing saying they had melted a chip or something, and the helpdesk thought they were mad, since silicon has a melting point of 1414 °C (or something) and that maybe they had melted something near the chip: they just couldn't believe that melting a chip was possible.

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