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Quake 4 Dowloaded Almost 1 000 000 Times


stiff_swede
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it's that age old question isn't it...

I can honestly say, hand on heart (and perhaps I'm a fool)... but I originally yarrrred Doom 3, played through it to the end and when the expansion came out, I bought the original and the expansion together.

Particularly with PC games, I'm not sure if my aging PC (1Gb RAM and 9800 pro) can cope with these new super games, so, more often than not I'll yarrrr at first if there's no demo available.

Would the above figures be the same if there was a demo available?

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a million times?! fucking hell.

if just 1% had bought instead of downloaded that's, what, 10,000 units? that alone has gotta hurt the bottom line.

at a super-assumptious guess i'd say more like 10% have downloaded rather than bought - 100,000pcs lost....

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I think the culture is getting out of control, and we're still just seeing the start of it as broadband (and newsgroups etc) really goes mainstream.  It's a major threat for any content based business but what can be done?

they can start releasing PC games WITHOUT computer-raping (and obviously completely ineffective) anti-piracy programs/procedures

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Quake 4 has this thing where it checks for CD keys online every time you start the game. Of course, it's not beyond that many people to disconnect their internet before playing.

And yeah, I downloaded it. I plain don't trust demoes these days, and games shops don't let you return PC games if they're shit. Until either of those things changes, I'll continue to just feel guilty downloading games, only to find they weren't worth the asking price after all.

edit: Was there even a Q4 demo? I don't remember hearing about one at all.

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I think the culture is getting out of control, and we're still just seeing the start of it as broadband (and newsgroups etc) really goes mainstream.  It's a major threat for any content based business but what can be done?

That was my first thought also, filesharing is no longer something for nerds it has become mainstream, for example on the same site the latest Desperate housewife episode is dowloaded almost 400 000 times!!!

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they can start releasing PC games WITHOUT computer-raping (and obviously completely ineffective) anti-piracy programs/procedures

Thats will solve approximately nothing. The number of people who pirated Q4 due to rightious indignation over copyright protection software must be negligable.

The problem is both that the anti-piracy techniques publishers use are ineffective and a culture which now exists where people feel it's their right to own//have access to, something they haven't paid for.

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they can start releasing PC games WITHOUT computer-raping (and obviously completely ineffective) anti-piracy programs/procedures

I agree that they're a real pain for those of us that legitimately buy games. But what alternatives are there? Do online CD key checks really work? And do they only typically work/exist for PC games?

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Will this be detrimental to the game's sales though? More people are likely to play the game, and the ones who find the game to their tastes might then decide to purchase the game in a more solid state, with the box and manual.

Does this happen? Will gamers who have downloaded a game feel the need to eventually buy it for keepsake? (I don't download games, question for those who do...)

As in; the collectors will buy games no matter what, and the ones who possiby aren't huge fans of the game/genre intend on playing the game, but not buying the 'whole' package.

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I personally don't play PC games anymore bar a demo here and there.

if I did want a particular game though, I would just download it.

bothering to go to a shop, handing over hard-earned (non-refundable) cash for a game which may or may not FUNCTION, let alone be any good, is not a sensible option for any but the most dedicated.

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It's one of the best games of the year, I wouldn't even think of yarring this one. Shame on these people!

Well that's your opinion, but I'm unconvinced you held such an opinion before you paid £30 to play it.

£30 just isn't an amount I'll spend on something I don't like.

In fact, I can't think of a number low enough to be okay.

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Quake 4 has this thing where it checks for CD keys online every time you start the game. Of course, it's not beyond that many people to disconnect their internet before playing.

I hope they store it in a database or something so that if anyone randomly generates my cd-key with a key gen I want them to be blocked, not me.

Someone in the Quake 4 thread already said they had got a real cd-key that was already in use. I don't want them stealing mine.

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Well that's your opinion, but I'm unconvinced you held such an opinion before you paid £30 to play it.

Well it's not very often I can say it but yeah, I did know it was going to be the game of the year. All reports were suggesting that the multiplayer was just a graphical upgrade of Quake 3, which instantly makes it worth £30 for me. Although I paid £38...

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But do people download just because they can download it or because they actually want to own it. I bet many of them would never have bought it anyways.

*sticks up hand*

Oh, oh - that's me!

Except I've not actually been arsed enough to downloaded it yet... which kinda says something :)

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Will this be detrimental to the game's sales though? More people are likely to play the game, and the ones who find the game to their tastes might then decide to purchase the game in a more solid state, with the box and manual.

Does this happen? Will gamers who have downloaded a game feel the need to eventually buy it for keepsake? (I don't download games, question for those who do...)

I think that if people can get something for free, without feeling guilty about it (which quite honestly nobody does with our culture the way it is) then there's very little chance that they will go out and buy the game.

I find that I buy a game because I 'want' to play it - once I've had it for a couple of evenings I'll probably get over that initial addiction and move on to something else, unless the game is particularly good. I'd warrant that a large amount of genuine retail sales are made on the same basis.

Those downloaders that do it for the 'right' reasons are all very noble, and they're obviously approaching downloading in a different way from the typical bittorrent kiddie who's after the latest cool shit for free. However, I would put money on the fact that all the noble people who claim to buy a game when they like it certainly don't always do that (for whatever reason), which puts them in the same boat as everyone else in my book, no matter how honourable their intentions.

In summary, I think that people should be able to try before they buy without having to d/l a yarred version somehow, that 90% of downloading is done with no intention of buying the finished product, and that even those that do it for the 'right' reasons don't always put their money where their mouth is.

(Awaits flames but hopes to provoke debate.)

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