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rllmuk

strider

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  1. Midsommar (2019, Cinema) When Dani Ardor (Florance Pugh) suffers a personal tragedy she decides to travel with her boyfriend, Christian (Jack Reynor) to visit a Swedish festival that only takes place every 90 years. When she arrives. A lot of fucking shit goes down. Okay, let's get the comparisons out the way right from the off. Midsommar is very much like The Wicker Man and features very similar themes. Thankfully, this is no mere rip-off however and Ari Aster's follow-up to Hereditary is every bit as unsettling and character-driven as his debut (although it's not quite as good). You can predict a lot of the shit that goes on in Midsommar, and not just because Aster delivers huge hints through the many runes and murals found throughout the movie. This sense of knowing works in Midsommar's favour however as you know that shit is going down, which leads to a great anticipation of dread that's difficult to shake. Midsommar isn't a conventional horror movie although there are certain horrific elements in it. It's a bizarre anti-date movie that's as funny as it is sickening and is as much about the end of a relationship as it is about new beginnings. It's a weird film too as it has a string of one-not largely forgettable male actors, discussing things you don't really care about and adhering to strict cinema tropes. Only Jack Reynor (looking like a budget Chris Pratt) leaves any lasting impression and many of them are so forgettable you won't care about their fates. It's good then that Pugh absolutely carries the movie, delivering an astounding performance of nervous energy and raging anguish that leaves her co-stars in the shade and mimics Toni Collette's excellent performance in Hereditary. Midsommar certainly won't be for everyone and it's a lot more predictable compared to Aster's debut, but that doesn't make it any less compelling to watch. 4.5/5
  2. HMV have a buy one get one free in store at the moment. older titles, but some decent ones.
  3. I actually want one of these, for no other reason that it has a proper dpad.
  4. Just be wary that massive lenses are very hard to use. I've got a 600mm lens and for years I've not been using it. I've started making a concentrated effort over the last few weeks and am really struggling with it as you need to keep the lens absolutely still and it picks up the tiniest of movements. I know the lens itself is fine as a friend used it to take some great shots. I clearly have a naff technique and I've been taking photos for years now. I'm the very definition of 'all the gear, absolutely no idea'
  5. strider

    PC Engine Mini

    If it’s M2 that’s the kind of crazy stuff they do. It makes little sense to sell a machine that’s stuffed with japanese classics people can’t actually play.
  6. I really enjoyed this. Review later. one thing though
  7. I'm going to see this tomorrow. I loved Hereditary and am really excited to see this.
  8. You can get the japan version for around 40 quid. Its pretty good fun.
  9. I've been playing the Switch version recently as I got the physical release of it. I've managed to get to level 6 but no it's getting ridiculous. Some of the levels have incredible stage designs. The ship is still a brilliant thing to take down.
  10. Yesterday (cinema, 2019) When struggling musician Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) get hit by a bus he wakes up in a world where no one except him has ever heard of The Beatles. He uses that knowledge to become the world's biggest star, but getting everything he ever wanted comes with hidden costs. Yesterday's concept is so high it requires oxygen. It's a truly brilliant idea that requires a huge suspension of disbelief to pull off. Sadly, despite a strong cast and a selection of great tunes, Yesterday manages to fall flat on almost every level. Screenwriter Richard Curtis mines his big book of cliches to deliver a weak script that never really explores its genuinely interesting premise. Yes there are fun little swipes suggesting that no Beatles means no Oasis, but Yesterday greatly downplays the sheer influence of The Beatles by suggesting that virtually every other musician you've ever heard of is alive and well, which ultimately downplays just what a big deal the Fab Four were. There are several points in Yesterday's sugary-sweet script when it looks like director Danny Boyle wants to take the film in darker directions and they typically appear whenever Jack wrestles with his conscience and realises that he's ultimately living a lie, but Curtis's flimsy script keeps Boyle steering towards sachharine island and those tantalising 'what ifs' are simply left dangling. Jokes are overplayed (we learn via internet searches that The Beatles aren't the only things to be forgotten about in this new world) and you can see the ending coming from a mile away. It's helpful then that Yesterday's cast are genuinely engaging thanks to a charming turn from Patel, the ever-likeable Lily James and a wonderful turn from Kate McKinnon as a truly vile record manager who shows her disdain for her new star at every available opportunity. They're all on top form but their characters are so paper thin it's amazing that don't get blown away. Ed Sheeran is the biggest surprise, not because he's so game at sending himself off, but because he genuinely struggles to give a convincing performance that he's Ed Sheeran. Yesterday's central idea promises much and it could have been something genuinely special, but it comes off as a missed opportunity and is content to simply wallow in cloying nostalgia. When Curtis took the idea to Boyle he should have just let it be. 2/5
  11. Had a friend do some micro adjustments so it doesn't seem to be back focusing. I'm leaning towards a 5D MKIV. I think I'll keep my 7D to go along with my 400mm lens as that's a really good combo, but the camera really struggles with the 600.
  12. It's a bit of both. I struggle to get super sharp shots with the 7d on the 600mm and a few 5d owners reckon it's because the smaller pixels leave very little room for margin. Iso is apparently an issue in Scotland as well and I rarely get anything good with high iso on the 7d.
  13. By rights, but we'd never do it (yet). Just like we don't regularly put PS2/Xbox/GameCube games on the cover
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