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Chosty

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  1. The Children's Film Foundation was brilliant - I seem to remember them showing on a Friday, so coming home from school to watch one was a great start to the weekend.
  2. Cape Fear (1991) This has recenty been added to Netflix and even though I've seen it a few times, I popped it on again last night. I know a lot of people view this as lesser Scorsese - one of his 'films for the studio' that grants him license to do a passion project - but I think it's one of my favourites of his and one of my favourite De Niro performances. I've never really taken to his mob films: even though I appreciate the cinematic craft, I find it hard to love them. I just don't really like gangster films on the whole. But Cape Fear is a stylised, mega-tight two-hour fun thriller (if that's not an oxymoron), with great performances from everyone that's just on the right side of OTT, and it's one of those films that looks amazing without drawing too much attention to itself. Every now and then you'll notice the beautifully textured film grain or the use of colour/lighting or deep focus, complete with those more noticeable trademark Scorsese flourishes like speedy push-ins and flash cuts. And all those slightly OTT elements stack up to create this hyper-real atmosphere that's just insanely watchable. Having said all that, it was one the first 18 films I saw at the cinema while underage, so I have fond memories of the film linked to that night almost 30 years ago that may partly cloud my judgement. And of course, it's also got one of the greatest, most terrifying orchestral themes in all of cinema courtesy of Bernard Hermann and Elmer Bernstein:
  3. You may be on to something there...
  4. I have issues with both, but I appreciate everyone has a different view of what constitutes gamesmanship.
  5. Regarding Chiellini's shirt yank, I hate all these bullshit euphemistic phrases that are thrown around, like 'dark arts' and 'clever gamesmanship'. It's cheating: nasty, blatant, cheating and I don't really know why it seems to have become normalised. There's nothing clever about it and it's not gamesmanship. The fact international footballing bodies don't take such offences more seriously is a joke, especially when you have such compelling evidence these days with HD, slow-mo video footage from half a dozen angles.
  6. Disappointed it's not an origins film of Argyle the limo driver from Die Hard. His backstory is just crying out to be told.
  7. So far nothing posted has conflicted with my theory.
  8. On a related note, there was only one series of The Day Today. I could do with some Chris Morris as Paxman right now.
  9. Trigonometry?! It's plane geometry, you mathematical heathens!
  10. Some crackers in here - thanks. One of my favourte albums is Bongo Rock (another massive influence on hip hop, I believe) and there are a few times it sounds like there's a cowbell, but I think it's just a really tight, high-pitched bongo.
  11. Good point - I'm a bit annoyed that I missed the digital sale the other weekend. I think BOTW was down to £40-odd quid.
  12. I'd rather play a retro 80s style point-and-click adventure where you're a junior executive who's recently joined OCP. You stumble across some dodgy paperwork and gradually uncover all the corruption in the organisation, making your way figuratively and literally up the OCP skyscraper to find out who's ultimately responsible. Set pieces could riff on scenes from the film, such as a tense game of verbal cat-and-mouse with a tough senior executive in the VIP toilets (pick the most appropriate response to avoid stepping over the line), sneaking past the aggressive military robots that provide security, dealing with horny escorts, etc. Robo pops up every now and then to pulp some bad guy or provide valuable intel. You have to avoid talking about family otherwise he goes off on one and starts punching screens.
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