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Darren

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  1. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    No it's not! The milk scene is a nice little character moment between Luke and Rey. It's nothing like the prequel slapstick of "creature farts" or "Jar Jar steps in camel poo."
  2. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    I get that it's a challenge but I don't think TLJ skips the journey, except it's shown in flashback after we've already seen the end result. But I don't know how they get around that 35-year gap unless they replaced the opening crawl with a trigger warning that Luke has gone a bit off the rails since Endor. I think it does come down the way each person reacted to him from the start. When he threw away the lightsaber and went marching off I was surprised but intrigued and keen to find out why. But I can also see how anyone who instantly and viscerally objected to that might have already made up their mind that the film was "wrong" and then, far from seeing the flashbacks as filling in some of the blanks (and hinting at others as I've laboriously pointed out) just saw them as yet more evidence of the film being wrong and showing Luke doing things he would never really do. I wonder if that lightsaber-throwing moment is the precise instant the fanbase split as it apparently has? Edit: But I totally get your point about Rey, although I like where they've gone with her so far I agree they could have done more, and I hope (and fully expect) it will come in her final episode.
  3. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    Incidentally I wonder if this is part of the reason for all the "Luke would never do that" objections. Perhaps a lot of people* thought that post-ROTJ Luke WAS infallible, and so were disappointed and even offended by the idea that he wasn't. *I mean in general, this is not meant to refer to anyone here
  4. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    I agree but I think that temptation is still to come for Rey. She's still very wet behind the ears and now (unless Ghost Luke shows up) she has no-one to teach her about how to avoid it. Snoke was never going to tempt her over as he's so obviously bad. Kylo is the one who can do it, she has conflicted feelings about him (she wants to bring him back over to the light) just as Luke had towards Vader. I suspect EPIX is going to have an echo of the throne room scene where Rey does give in but ultimately pulls back and gives Kylo a chance to redeem himself in the process. It's going to be like poetry!
  5. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    I like that and I think it adds some depth to the portrayal of the Force in these films. It isn't an RPG where you grind to a certain level then unlock Jedi Master and from then on you're infallible. Instead the dark side is always there, niggling away, tempting you with the quick and easy path. We saw that in the ROTJ duel when Vader says "then perhaps she will" and Luke gets the red mist and through that (he's absolutely channeling the dark side in the last part of the battle) he gets the upper hand (no pun intended!) and only then realises the folly of the path he's now on, and rejects it again. But the crucial thing is he's not rejected it once and for all. The sleeping Ben scene shows that the temptation of the dark side never goes away. And it proved to Luke that he was still not (and would never be) above giving in to that temptation. All of which contributes to his decision to cut himself off from the force altogether. He convinces himself that even trying to train new Jedi was a mistake - he may think that even that was unwittingly doing the dark side's work - because he's just unleashed more dangerous people on the galaxy who are just as susceptible to the dark side as him. If even he can't resist it, what chance have they got? And so in a desperate attempt to prevent himself unwittingly making things even worse he turns away from the force altogether.
  6. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    And it's worth every penny for the look Luke gives Rey, and her reaction.
  7. Darren

    The Leftovers. (HBO show)

    Nngh! It says something about this show that I know exactly where you are with two episodes to go, and I'm desperate to say more about what you're about to see but I won't. Check back in when you're done!
  8. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    This is the crux of it for me. I didn't just like it, I loved it, I loved the Luke-Rey-Ben triangle at the heart of it all and I liked the way the other characters from TFA developed. And so at no point when watching it did I start thinking "why don't the baddies just do X?" Star Wars films are all about the emotional journey as far as I'm concerned - there's a reason George was at pains to say they were Space Fantasy not Science Fiction right from the start. And I think TLJ nails that emotional journey. I fully accept this may be because, as a middle aged man who's had my own mental health fun and games in recent years, Luke resonated with me in a way he wouldn't have done if he'd been the older but essentially unchanged version of his younger self that lots of people seem to want (not necessarily you Smitty, I can't remember what your view on Old Man Skywalker is). So TLJ has chimed with me more than any other Star Wars film, and I can't help forgiving a lot of its flaws because they pale into insignificance next to its heart, which is in exactly the right place.
  9. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    I took that as another sign of Hux's overconfidence and hubris. He's like a cat with a cornered mouse - he could go in for the quick kill but he'd rather have some fun and prolong his victims' agony. He even says something like "we have them on the end of a string" which I read as him taking sadistic pleasure in the slow chase to what he thinks is their inevitable doom. And of course in doing so he gives them (a few of them, at least) the opportunity to escape.
  10. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that you had, that was a more general caveat for anybody (still) reading the thread...
  11. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    I genuinely liked it. What can I say! Just to counter the impression that I'm such a fanboy that I'll unquestioningly lap up anything that says Star Wars on it, even I don't think TLJ is perfect. I think I said in my very earliest impressions in this thread that it's flawed, it takes a lot of risks and they don't all work, but I'd rather that than playing it safe, which was fine for TFA to get us back on track after the prequels, but another by the numbers retread of the original films would have been very dull compared to what we got which (for me) opened things up in new and interesting directions. For example, I can see the point of the Canto Bight mission but I think the execution is poor compared to the rest of the film, especially that tracking shot past all the wacky aliens in the casino, and the whole chase sequence. And of course it contains the worst character in the entire film, DJ, who is essential for Finn's character development but performed absolutely terribly. If we're going to complain about comedy characters I'd start with him and his ridiculous stutter, which is even less convincing than Michael Palin's in A Fish Called Wanda and can only be an attempt by Benicio Del Toro to make himself the millennials' Jar Jar Binks, possibly for a bet. I certainly don't think TLJ is perfect but I do think it's the best and the most interesting of the new films and the best Star Wars film since Empire. I've no problem people having other views but I can't help responding when someone says something in the film is "literally unbelievable" when it's a direct parallel with actual real life events that have happened in Real Wars.
  12. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    It's not about making him a cartoon villain, it's about quickly (re)establishing his character: pompous, self-important and blinded to imminent risk by his overinflated sense of superiority. He's a combination of the Peter Principle and the Dunning Kruger Effect in human form. I agree he doesn't have the gravitas of Tarkin (I think this is down to the character rather than the actor though) but who does? He's more like Mr Bronson in TESB.
  13. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    The difference between Han in Star Wars and Poe in TLJ is that Han is a two-bit crook making it up as he goes along. He knows it probably won't work and sure enough, it doesn't. Poe is a Billy Big Balls who thinks he can take on the entire enemy fleet single handedly because a few hours earlier he fired the shot that blew up their entire base planet. So far he's never failed in any mission so he thinks he's infallible. Han doesn't need to learn that hustling doesn't always work, but Poe does need to learn that going in all guns blazing is not the answer to everything.
  14. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    Well, you've explained that you think it's unbelievable that an officer could make a reckless decision that costs his subordinates' lives, or that the troops could follow his orders to their deaths, or that doing something completely unexpected could put the enemy on the back foot, in which case I assume you also don't believe the Charge of the Light Brigade or D-Day could possibly have happened either. Nobody brought up mansplaining. Where did that come from?
  15. Darren

    Star Wars: The Last Jedi - December 2017

    Yes, it's literally unbelievable that he could be so focused on his personal objective that he achieves it at the cost of literally all his comrades' lives. Yes it's literally unbelievable that his comrades would follow their commander's orders rather than those of his superior officer of which they are unaware. Yes it's literally unbelievable that doing something utterly unexpected would confuse the enemy and buy valuable time. You do understand that the whole point of the film is that he's WRONG to do the first two things, right? (The third was his actual mission to buy the fleet time to escape).
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