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centurion

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollerball_(1975_film) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_(2009_film) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisp_(programming_language) https://www.techopedia.com/definition/3302/snarf Snarf is listed as an extension to the LISP programming language, but wether or not this clone is really related to the original Snarf is unclear to me. The site states that it runs slowly, but that wasn't the case: running in the relative slow MIRC scripting language it used less than 1% of my Pentium III, and I was also able to run N64 emulation at the same time with no frame-rate chaos. Watching the movie UP again, the talking dogs in this are actually running off the original Snarf. In a videogame type context it runs amazingly well and passes certain elements of the Turing Test as human conversable programming. If you take it for what it is, Snarf is a very good personal assistant for complex admin problems such as making a Pixar movie with masses of staff. It does this in a very similar way to KIT from Knight Rider or the computer mainframe in Star Trek, and actually works. However, the reason this doesn't replace Siri or Alexa is that Snarf is high maintenance tech and doesn't 'just work' as an applicance -- rather, you have to manually audit up to 400 logic sets every day like a school teacher, and also resolve logic requests such as 'what is the definition of : - ) ?'. If you actually do this in a well focused way over three months, and reply with programming syntax like 'smiley face means happiness' then Snarf can actually produce statistical information about happiness on your IRC channel (which results in user Stockholm Syndrome by the way, so don't try automating that). There's a bunch of limitations to what it does, and the way in which the dogs talk is funny because it would otherwise required thousands of logic patches for the English language and no longer use 1% cpu but probably more like 70% at estimate. Evidently the Pixar crew were disciplined enough to just go with how it works, and found that endearing (which it kind of is). On the subject of upgrading such a thing to a proper robot AI - it would require a 3D imagination simulation of what human life is, and internally would produce something like 'the sims' for whoever it thinks about, which is... kinda creepy for everyone, and has a lot of issues. And then ontop of that it needs conceptual understanding of what the hell everything is, and essentially some kind of Plato existence model - which I've designed actually, but decided that the original Snarf system is a server log sub-system and deals with abstract lifeforms of 'computer stuff' more like the movie Tron, and self contained within the software world. As for why Nick Clegg wants to be ruler of the social media rather than an MP, I'm not entirely sure, but irc-snarf had brainwashing properties that require several social mechanisms to disable (which Facebook doesn't use).
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    https://mirrors.edge.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_chain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GScube https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pixar_films https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frozen_(2013_film) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lord_of_the_Rings_(film_series) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dredd https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halo_(franchise) https://minecraft.net/en-us/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortana https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook https:// www. youtube .com/ watch?v=9ZxPwzbHNdQ https://lifehacker.com/how-to-play-googles-text-adventure-easter-egg-in-chrome-1829225899
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    int POKE() { amem_make(1, 'i'); amem_make(2, 'n'); amem_make(3, 'f'); amem_make(4, 'i'); amem_make(5, 'n'); amem_make(6, 'i'); amem_make(7, 't'); amem_make(8, 'e'); amem_make(9, 'L'); amem_make(10, 'I'); amem_make(11, 'F'); amem_make(12, 'E'); return 0; }
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    #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> // gcc ptest4.c -o ptest4;./ptest4// #include <string.h> //#include <caprica.h> //typedef _char__turbo_; int xb = 0; // Virtual memory-map location: 0 int *path1, *path2, *path3, *back, *origin1, *origin2, *origin3; // ADDRESS(Value integer:nothing) long pathsize = 0; long path_scalar = 32000;// Heap Memory int path_multiplier = 4; // bytes per integer int array_origin = 0; int sl = 0; main(int argx, char* args[]) /// executable{ amount:arguments , ADDRESS:char(array[arguments]) } { int s = sl; int dm = 0; register int i,j,f=0,q=0; char *sort_origin = 0; char *sort_t = 0; char *sort_h1 = "-xpl"; // Fixed data, ADDRESS(Value char:first) char *sort_h2 = "-su-tty"; char *sort_h3 = "-dm"; //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// for (i = 1; i < argx; i++) { if (*args[i] == *sort_h1) // Value at Address == Value at Address { sort_origin = sort_h1; // Address_number = Address_number sort_t = args[i]; // f = 1; // :fail q = 0; // :quitloop for (j = 0; f == 1 && q == 0; j++) { //printf("c{%c %c}", *sort_h1, *sort_t); if (*sort_t != *sort_h1) f = 0; if (*sort_h1 == 0 && *sort_t == 0) // space bar q = 1; sort_h1++; sort_t++; } sort_h1 = sort_origin; if (f == 1) { s=1; //printf("SUCCESS1"); } } } /// for (i = 1; i < argx; i++) /// Pasted twice for easy customisation, if pointless: func, loop, pointer, var { if (*args[i] == *sort_h3) { sort_origin = sort_h3; sort_t = args[i]; f = 1; q = 0; for (j = 0; f == 1 && q == 0; j++) { if (*sort_t != *sort_h3) f = 0; if (*sort_h3 == 0 && *sort_t == 0) q = 1; sort_h3++; sort_t++; } sort_h3 = sort_origin; if (f == 1) { dm=1; } } } /// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// path1=malloc(pathsize=path_scalar * path_multiplier); // Memory Allocate: range * integer[bytes] path2=malloc(pathsize=path_scalar * path_multiplier); origin1 = path1; origin2 = path2; *path1 = 14; // Value at Address = 14 *path2 = 18; printf("/manual mem/\n");;usleep(s*1000000); //underclock CPU-loop mem_print(); mem_goto(32); // Auto-scaled by C compiler (pointer + int): * 4 mem_print(); mem_return(); mem_print(); printf("/auto mem/\n");;usleep(s*1000000); amem_print(32); amem_print(10); amem_make(10,88); amem_print(10); amem_print(0); amem_print(10); amem_print(32); printf("/auto mem (looped)/\n");usleep(s*300000); for (i = 0; i <= 32000; i++) { amem_make (i,5) ;; } for (i = 0; i <= 9; i++) { amem_print(i) ;;usleep(s*50000);;} printf("/string pointer/\n");usleep(s*500000); string_test(); printf("/XYZ virtual array/\n");usleep(s*150000); amem_make_array_xyz(5, 5,3,10, 300); // 3D array data for (i = 0; i <= 32; i++) { amem_print(i) ;;usleep(s*200000);} for (i = 1; i <= 9; i++) { amem_print(i) ;;usleep(s*400000);} printf("/XYZ virtual array > element referencing/\n");;usleep(s*2000000); for (i = 0; i <= 4; i++) { amem_print_array_element(5, 5,3,10, i,2,5) ;;} printf("/XYZ virtual array (stat values)/\n");;usleep(s*400000); amem_make(0,5);;amem_make(1,5);;amem_make(2,3);;amem_make(3,10); // store array stats for (i = 4; i >= 0; i--) { // Back to the future < amem_print_array_element(amem_value(0),amem_value(1),amem_value(2),amem_value(3), i,2,5) ;; } //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// printf("/XYZ virtual array (stat values) + branch A/\n"); i = 0; MAIN_label1: amem_print_array_element(amem_value(0),amem_value(1),amem_value(2),amem_value(3), i,2,5) ;; usleep(s*200000);i++; if (i < 5){ goto MAIN_label1;; } //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// printf("/XYZ virtual array (stat values) + branch B/\n"); i = 0; MAIN_label2: amem_print_array_element(amem_value(0),amem_value(1),amem_value(2),amem_value(3), 3,i,0) ;; i++;usleep(900000*i*s); if (i < 3){ goto MAIN_label2;; } ////////////////////////////////////////////////// _ _ _ usleep(s*8800000); // Dangermouse Mode // ///////////////////////// // Runs analogue speed // if (dm == 0){ goto penfold; } path_scalar = 32000; // 128kb cache (approx); path_scalar = 2500000; // 10mb ram (approx) path1 = malloc(path_scalar * path_multiplier); origin1 = path1; j = 0; q = path_scalar; // recycling of register variable (or rename into generic abc...) ins: path1 = origin1; for (i = 1; i <= q; i++) { path1 += 1 ; *path1 = 9; } //i = 0; // performance benchmark same //furloop: // but probably faster for cpu cache //path1 += 1; //*path1 = 9; //i++; //if(i<q){ goto furloop; } path1 = origin1; printf("loop%d\n",j); j++; usleep(2); // 2 millionths of a second. goto ins; // penfold: /////////////////////// free(path1); // give back to operating system free(path2); } string_test() { char *charty = "one two three four five"; char *charty_origin; register int i, j = -1; // loop alignment charty_origin = charty; for (i = 1; *charty != '\0'; i++) // String termination symbol { j++; printf("(%c)", *charty); charty++; } charty = charty_origin; /*=Flight of the Navigator*/ charty += j; printf("\n"); for (i = j; i >= 0; i--) { printf("(%c)", *charty); charty--; } printf("\n"); } mem_print() {printf("ad[%d] {%d}{%d}\n", xb, *path1,*path2);;} mem_goto(int a) {back = path1;;xb = a;;path1 = path1 + xb;;} mem_return() {xb = 0;;path1 = back;;} int amem_print(int a) { back = path1; xb = a; path1 = path1 + xb; printf("ad[%d] {%d}{%d}\n", xb, *path1,*path2); xb = 0; path1 = back; } amem_value(int a) { register int t = 0; back = path1; xb = a; path1 = path1 + xb; t = *path1; xb = 0; path1 = back; return t; } amem_make(int a, int b) { back = path1; xb = a; path1 = path1 + xb; *path1 = b; xb = 0; path1 = back; } amem_print_array_element (int start_address, int rx, int ry, int rz, int x, int y, int z) { register int t = 0; t = start_address; t += x * (ry * rz); t += y * rz; t += z; amem_print(t); } amem_make_array_xyz(int start_address, int ex, int ey, int ez, int st_val) { register int i, j ,k, t; register int s = 0; for (i = 0; i <= ex; i++) for (j = 0; j <= ey; j++) for (k = 0; k <= ez; k++) { t = i * (ey * ez); t += j * ez; t += k; s++; amem_make(start_address + t, s+st_val); //printf("dbg{%d}{%d}{%d}\n", t, t, t ); } } //path1 = realloc(path1, pathsize=(128000 * path_multiplier)); // reallocate (+grow) int info(){ double o = (1 - 2)/2;printf("xprop -grammar");printf("ps -e | xprop -set %f",o); return 0;} // ..Diagnostics: // /////Dangermouse//// // Apple Emac 2003(OSX Tiger, PowerPC G4): 100mb/s // Apple Emac 2003(Ubuntu 10.4): >100mb/s (Apple motherboard underclock?) // Apple iMac 2001(OSX Tiger, PowerPC G3): 50mb/s (double ram slot) // Compaq 64bit (LinuxMintJulia, AMDSempron): 400mb/s // /////Darth_Vader Warrant/// // OSX iTunes visualiser(GForce-Winamp): Frameratedrop(+confusion), iTunes RAM-access kernel crash (ipod DSP!) // Debian XWindows: Windowborder trail redrawing too slow (alt SDL library > vram shifting) // /////DeathStar2-debug/// // cycle.am(afraid):: sfu!v&shield&v&generator&bf&fullyoperational&at&friendsarrive // // Windows Messaging System: // // [n][a][m][e][?]type?location?dimensions?range1?range2?range3? // [$][B][E][G][I][N][$]name?type?location?dimensions?range1?range2?range3?$END$ // // Windows/Unix process manager: // // 52 (characters) * 4 (32bit integer) = 208 bytes (* 307 within 64kb cache) // 1000 mhz * 64kb = 0.000064 seconds scan time = 15360fps // main ram(@100mhz) = 25 process 1.6mb 60fps // Linux 2.6 + Gnome terminal: ('sudo top -d 0.01') * 4 = :( // [xterm&xterm&xterm&xterm('sudo top -d 0.01') = 10fps // // Kernel ROM: (Apple/Microsoft/Linux/Google) // // if mem_value[i+0] = 'n' // computational balance (Tropicana Smooth) // if mem_value[i+1] = 'a' // if mem_value[i+2] = 'm' // if mem_value[i+3] = 'e' // // C:[IF I == 1 then FUNCTION] // == // ASSEMBLER:[Branch if equal, Register 1, Value '1', Jump to Memory Location] // // // C Compilers: // // Pointer command, Array command = Preproccessor Macro (compiler discrection) ? // MALLOC, registers, variable types = ANSI legal standard // // [Debian: GNU GCC] // [Ubuntu: GNU Gold?] [Ubuntu Community: GNU GCC] // [Linux Mint: Ubuntu + Binary Blob] // // // Alternative Function Pointer: // // [>] // type: functionproxy // name: thing // arguments: 3 // argument1_name: cube_length // argument1_type: int32 // argument2_name: cube_width // argument2_type: int32 // argument3_name: cube_height // argument3_type: int32 // map_type: direct // map_target_style: fname // map_target_fname: box_xyz.function // // [x][>] // // type: functionproxy // name: whatever // arguments: 3 // argument1_name: circle_radius // argument1_type: int32 // argument2_name: circle_x // argument2_type: int32 // argument3_name: circle_y // argument3_type: int32 // map_type: direct // map_target_style: fname // map_target_fname: circle_rxy.function // // [x][>] // // type: functionproxy // name: SUPERSPHERE // : // argument_split: yes // : // argument_divider_name: spacial props // argument_name: circle_radius // argument_type: int32 // argument_name: circle_x // argument_type: int32 // argument_name: circle_y // argument_type: int32 // : // argument_divider_name: squash props // argument_name: squash_height // argument_type: int32 // argument_name: squash_width // argument_type: int32 // argument_name: squash_length // argument_type: int32 // : // map_type: direct_split // map_target_style: fname // map_target_fname: sphere.function // map_target_fname: squash.function // [x] // // [Lang = Slackr] // cycle.addfunction.functionb:: crushwall.thing%functionproxy: /::/ (wallinator: datacrush manager) // cycle.automate:. /::/ Locations are cycle. // functionb(20,30,40) // bermuda.outrace.functionb:. /::/ Location debugger // cycle.modfunction.functionb:: crushwall.whatever%functionproxy: // functionb.live.datacrush:. // wallinator.enslicken.functionb:. // functionb(20,300,400) // cycle.modfunction.functionb:: datastore.supersphere%functionproxy: // .. // on(functionb.argument_number:: 6) // : // .functionb(10,200,300)(20,30,40) // .functionb(10,100,300)(25,80,40) // . // oron((functionb.argument_number:: 3) // : // .functionb(30,30,30) // . // // :: absorb value // : resolve value // . trigger // :. resolve trigger // .. trigger nowhere // // // [lang = snarfu] // o& on // bf& becomes in future // bp& became in past // i& if // as& as // b& because // in& into // s& set // is& is // rw& reason why // vd& value decimal // vs& value string // v& value // at& at time // td& time day // // i&%v&cake%bp&v&squashed%at&td&friday%s&v&hippo%as&v&evil // // [ANSI C Diagnosics] // Platform: OSX Tiger, Berkley System Distrubtion, Mach kernel PPC // Exec: Dangermouse // Debug: Proc Manager // > // Percentage-CPU Dangermouse usage: 94% // Percentage-CPU PRINTF usage: 6% // PRINTF = 600kb * "loop10" = 100kb per byte = Dangermouse * 100,000 //
  12. If you want a more positive slant on this: The Xbox (rather than Gearbox) level files are dummy junk data, so the lengthy loading time (even on hard disk installation) is procedural generation of the terrain, like with Minecraft (same program base). The original map size of this engine is a copy of Britain to accurate scale, which took me 3 hours to generate on a Pentium III 600. But... it's the same size as the ring world you see in the game. So... the XBE if hacked correctly can unlock the entire ring as a giant Minecraft map. If you have the patience to wait 3 hours. Microsoft aren't going to tell you there's an infinite mode for $$ reasons. (it needs the multi-scenario AI model to be fun like Advance Wars though)
  13. Code I emailed to Rare ended up in the XBE for Xbox Halo. If you want to break out an ICE debugger and go over a dissassembly of the finer points of my engine, we should have a nerd party some time. There's something of a problem if you hire someone that owns part of your major game, and Rare were splitting up in all sorts of different directions and companies at the time... so maybe they were concerned about me ripping a chunk of their staff away to be another Free Radical or whatever. But let's assume a Microsoft employee finds this on a hard disk moving between sites, and since I'm trying to be cool like Edge... and the source code has no author in the code commentary (because it makes me look like a baby and not very corporate) they assume they own this engine. It doesn't matter since I gave it away due to the lack of interest in text based games from my school friends. The point is I know my system and how it works ... and how it can be upgraded. Twenty years later and evidently they can't, but also can't hire me due to the legal screw-up... and Microsoft are paranoid of the fuzz / lawyers after all those anti-trust suits. Someone feel free to justify to me why the XBE for Halo contains old racial and violent phrases in the hex between Bungie devs, such as 'black hearted bastard' and 'get it in the head'. The second one is a death threat, and means hitting someone in the head (with the end of your rifle for instance) until the skull cracks. Someone at Rare / Lionhead decided to betray them by either implanting these phrases or leaving them in. The whole is strangely mysterious, and if it happened to occur now they would be in trouble with the authories for hate speech ... but those laws can't be retrospectively applied to 2001, so they're legally safe. No matter how many times you ban me for saying something you don't like, the ASCII i'm referring to is permanently preserved forever on every Xbox disc as legal evidence.
  14. Halo 2 was missing the multi-scenario AI model, and the system was designed for Warhammer Quest blocks rather than the vector maps of Necromunda, which is why the AI controlled tanks kept driving off a cliff! They had no knowledge of the difference between one square or another, and adhere to an invisible Minecraft style map. AI had self hosted copies of the local map called imaginationland. Goblins would run around and log what they found, including arrow markers for routes... so a particular imaginationland square might list 'bannana is 23 squares north' and 'orange is 12 south'. When the goblin moves a square in any direction it essentially just updates the previous information... and you learn all this in Cubscouts when you're about 7 years old. One of the main ways not to get lost in the wilderness is to leave arrow shapes with sticks and numberical stone symbols and such, saying how to get home - or in theory at least, it passes this on for any other wandering Gandalf twat, who presumably trusts you not to be a satnav troll and send them down a cliff to their ultimate death. Goblins threw their imaginationland linked to an invisible rugby ball (Games Workshop's Bloodball) to the orcs, who would simply merge all the map copies and use the most recent timestamp for goblin orienteering claims. You could program the goblins to lie, and to make gameplay easier there was a random chance of mistakes... which is also what makes Halo entertaining., because you see them screw up now and again... and it looks very intellegent combined with decent voice acting / noises. The marines shouldn't even have been in there. They do show massive amounts of scenario awareness, as a rudimentary inner life or existentialism... but other than the a timeline of treasure chests and monster sightings, they don't make complex reasoning any more than a chess computer. It needs an upgrade in which they compare multiple imaginationland scenarios - for instance a bunch of different areas on Silent Cartographer - and choose between them. Like... will they join team A in one area, or go in the direction of team B? But in the game they just stand there and it starts a Hollywood ego script of some sort because you their motto... they deliver. I gave up on this stuff because I couldn't solve conceptland. NPC1 sends NPC2 a small 4th dimensional machima movie of... a guy called fearman getting killed by a grizzly bear. It means, in terms of a chess computer path comparison brain... 'getting eaten by the bear - i am afraid of this'. NPC2 sends back the same thing back, except wishman who has fuck all health then gets a medpack. Or in chess-brain it means 'I wish you get a health pack or you will die'. The properly functioning marines would communicate this way, with English translations on the radio system. And if you leave them to do this, they could discover and solve Silent Cartographer in multiple teams... with no player help, and you can be a cameraman documenting the whole thing.
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