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mikejenkins

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  1. Also Skies of Arcadia US (which is fine on VGA).
  2. I'll be very interested to see how this goes as it seems most of the current retro interest is driven by collecting rather than playing.
  3. That's likely to be a Mega Drive (1) cable but could be any one of the few systems that used 8 pin DIN connectors.
  4. I liked the 3DS as a system but I find all of the hinged "square" portables from Nintendo really uncomfortable to hold and get thumb cramp within minutes, this seems to get worse the larger they get. I sold my Pikachu 3DS XL during Pokemon Go mania but my wife still has a Pokemon Y version and I have some sealed games that I never got around to playing which I will keep hold of.
  5. If you can find a Commodore (1084 or similar) or Philips (CM8833 or similar) monitor with RGB inputs these make very nice displays for 240p content, if a bit small - these should be fairly easy to find in Germany. I have a SCART-9 pin RGB cable in mine and that is connected to a SCART switcher.
  6. I'll be interested to hear what the quality is like on that as I have maxed out my switch.
  7. This is also very true and the downsides of CRT are easily forgotten (I normally forget until I get yet another one that has flickering/dodgy colour/geometry/won’t fit in my games area etc). My old consoles look great quality wise on my plasma TV but the size of it makes the pixels very unpleasant. I wonder if there is sufficient demand from rich retro people to make new 21 inch-ish 4:3 LCDs with good scalers and legacy connections.
  8. In my experience old LCD TVs look washed out, have poor contrast and extreme lag, and the ones that should support exact or doubled pixel mapping only do it over VGA. I haven’t used the model in the previous post. I have tried a Retrotink 2X SCART on a modern IPS LCD monitor and it does a decent job on 240p but looks crappy on 480i stuff. If you have the space for a ~20” CRT the consoles you mention will definitely look best on one as opposed to an LCD (screen size is also important as the bigger you go, the lower the effective resolution becomes, and the worse the games look).
  9. Lots of SCART cables around this period put AV breakouts on the cable so you could plug it into an amplifier for decent sound, and function as an all in one composite/RGB cable. You want to avoid the ones that have a separate SCART connector with composite and audio on them as they can never be RGB: https://cpc.farnell.com/pro-signal/psg08244/scart-adaptor/dp/AR71328? You always take a chance with third party cables and I have had extremely variable results with PlayStation and Dreamcast ones, the Innovation one is decent.
  10. Can’t go wrong with official RGB SCART cables for all three of those consoles, they should be fairly easy to find.
  11. I think by the time that would have happened, PC VGA was the main "other version" so we still got stuck with 320x200 res games with the odd exception like Sensible Soccer.
  12. Speedball 2 is clearly better on the Amiga (although the ST does a decent job of scrolling for a change) but Gods and Xenon 2 are very choppy on both platforms. I think by the time the Chaos Engine came around there was a big difference in quality.
  13. Most of the Bitmap Bros games seem to have been written with the ST in mind, in that they have limited colours and are mostly squashed on the Amiga versions.
  14. The Falcon has a pretty slow 68030 in terms of clock speed but has some funky additional chips in there that allow it to do things like run Doom much faster than something like an expanded Amiga 1200 at three times the clock speed. Not much ever used its capabilities as Atari killed it to focus all their energies on the almighty Jaguar. For some reason they fetch an insane amount of money from collectors.
  15. Will do! I also have the 2004 zombie issue from Retro Gamer but I guess that is non canon.
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