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gone fishin'

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  1. Well... there was supposed to be games released for it as part of the stretch goals -Rex Next and a next Dizzy game, but bugger all has been heard of them recently.
  2. The final amount of debt is very surprising, makes you wonder who they owed money to. The final statement from the receivers summary on the status of the backers is the most damning piece to me. It really shows how little the crowdfunding companies like Indiegogo provide to the backers. Even when a company goes into liquidation, the £500k paid by the backers is not considered a debt due to the terms of the campaign, even though the backers basically funded the whole fucking thing and this money enabled the directors to build up even more debt, and yet the backers are entitled to fuck all. I’m absolutely astonished that he crowdfunding companies can get away with this - offering zero insurance or even following up on their “threats” of “sending the bailiffs” in when in actual fact all they’re doing is taking a 10% cut to essentially provide a web and email marketing platform with no legal consequences when it goes wrong.
  3. gone fishin'

    Antstream - It's Netflix for Games!

    Something else I’d also be worried about, what’s stopping Anstream from going to websites that currently host roms, because a lot of the retro scene is based around general goodwill regarding roms, and demanding a takedown? Understandably Nintendo have a history of doing this with their own games, but what’s stopping Antstream from going to World of Spectrum, Spectrum Computing, CSDB or any other retro gaming website and demanding they remove the roms, as they are the “official licensee” of those games? The conflicting commercial statements like “we pay the creators” but actually “we pay the holders of the IP”, “it’s a retro gaming platform because we love retro games” but “we’re really wanting to expand it to a game streaming platform taking on Google, Amazon” leaves a bit of a bad taste, making me suspicious of what Antstream’s true future plans or even view of the retro gaming scene are. I don’t think there’s been any public statement on the terms of the contracts, exclusivity etc.
  4. gone fishin'

    Antstream - It's Netflix for Games!

    Not just Google, but Microsoft, Sony or anyone else who's pushing Game Streaming tech. I totally understand if the company is using Retro games as a way of testing the streaming technology with the long term goal of optimising so that any game could be streamed over it, but that's not what's being communicated to the current customer base, who are being told the service is being built around Retro Gaming. So does that mean development in the Retro gameplay features like Challenges, Online co-op etc will be less than the development of the underlying streaming technology, because let's be honest, if they've got decent streaming technology for Retro Games, they probably don't need to develop it much further. Most of the games are going to require sub SD resolution video encoding, they're not going to require much cloud processing power, so I would presume the development should be going into the added features over just playing on an emulator (or emulating new systems). But saying you're also wanting to expand the service to stream, what I presume, is more powerful games, with a fairly small development team, is worrying because it's likely development will be compromised trying to compete with Google, Microsoft, Sony etc. @JPickford I loved your response at the "suits" behind the games putting in as much effort as the original "creators", so deserve revenue. I'm presuming this was sent out as part of the Press Release for the Kickstarter Campaign Launch, as it was copied in a lot of Retro Websites. Don't recognise a lot of retro game "creators" in there! ;-)
  5. Remember, Official Receivers aren't the Insolvency Practitioners, they're part of the UK Government's Insolvency Service. It does sound like they're making conflicting statements - one on hand they said that backers are not legally creditors meaning they can't make a decision on who would be appointed as the Insolvency Practitioner, but can make a claim for any money/assets once the Insolvency Practitioner has carried out their assessment of RCL (along with any other creditor). What the Receivers are saying might be true, that backers could have registered individually as creditors, but failed to do so (but even if they did, their claim as a creditor would likely be rejected anyway). It's likely that this is different people from the Official Liquidators "department" making these statements and I know the Vega has got a lot of publicity, but at the end of the day this is just a government process that the company is going through. Now that an Insolvency Practitioner has been assigned, it's their job to start reviewing what assets are left to sell off. Once they know how much money is available, the backers could all register as claimants to that money. But to be honest, all of this is completely futile. We know there's going to be fuck all money or assets left anyway.
  6. gone fishin'

    Antstream - It's Netflix for Games!

    I know you've said you're going to step back from posting in this thread, but your statement on the goal of Anstream just adds to the confusing state of the "goal" of Antstream. It's Netflix for Retro Games. Because we love retro games! ...But eventually it's going to be Netflix for anyone who wants to make games, probably indie or home made games, that has nothing to do with Retro. Is that what your customer base is wanting? Those that backed a Kickstarter claiming to be "The first streaming platform for retro gaming. Available on PC, Mac, Xbox One, and mobile devices." but then changes direction to an indie game platform, or any games for that matter, because that was the goal all along, but that wasn't necessarily communicated for the Kickstarter campaign (or indeed any of the publicity I've seen for the service on retro gaming websites)? Maybe that's the pitch to the non Kickstarter investors, but it's a dangerous game having a different long term goal to the one that brought on your initial (and hopefully the most loyal) customers.
  7. gone fishin'

    Antstream - It's Netflix for Games!

    I dunno, I think it's pretty easy to sort out the problem of paying the original creators with a clear vision for the company/service. A pitch to the IP holders could go like this.... "Hi, we're Anstream and I understand you now own the IP rights to publisher Gremlin/Ocean/Mastertronic/Whoever, which you have due to various corporate acquisitions over the years. We're proposing a new retro game service, but our vision is that the original creators will receive royalties for those games, after all it was those creators that made those great games that we all love to this day. Now, at the moment you're earning nothing from the current state of retro gaming - people "pirate" old roms and you get paid nothing. What we're proposing will mean you'll get paid something for people paying those games, however in order to get your games on our service - and therefore for you to start being paid streaming royalties - you have to agree 50% of the royalties going to a creator fund we've setup, which will then divide it accordingly. If you don't want to do this, then that's fine, we won't host your games on our service and you'll be paid nothing anyway. Sounds like a good deal? Sign up here. Great, that way we can promote the fact that we're changing retro gaming as the original creators are finally getting paid and the market will like that" They might have fewer games on the service to start with, but others would eventually follow once they saw it was successful. They could genuinely promote it as a service that pays the creators, instead kind of implying that they are, but then in some cases they're not.
  8. Basically, yes. There are also the selling of the assets to fund the creditors. But the insolvency practitioner has to still audit the bank accounts and check for any wrongdoings and publish their report on why the company failed, to all registered creditors. That means Melbourne and Andrews will get access to this report. Also, it sounds like the solicitors are still owed significant amounts of money, so I don’t think RCL are going to “get away with it”, unless those solicitors are happy to lose money. The saddest thing about this is that none of the backers registered as a creditor. Even when they were asked to be represented by that one person, IIRC less than a hundred did.
  9. gone fishin'

    Hellboy to be rebooted, new director and lead

    They forgot to put "low" in front of budget then. Sounds like it was done on the cheap, seeing as the first one had a budget of $66m and that was 15 years ago and this looks like essentially a remake of the first one. Really surprised this didn't end up "straight to Netflix"
  10. gone fishin'

    Atmosfear/NightMare 1994 prototype - Unreleased SNES game

    Fixed that with much more credible games!
  11. gone fishin'

    Amiga Appreciation Thread

    HDF an Amiga hard disk file format, which allows you to make a backup of your Amiga HDD (which I presume is what someone has done - likely with all the games installed as WHDLoad games). There's an utility here: http://www.generationamiga.com/2018/04/15/hstwb-v1-2-0-released-easily-build-amiga-hdf-or-directory-images/
  12. gone fishin'

    The first one is still the best one

    Jack the Nipper: The second one should have been called "Monty Mole in Tropical Trouble" or something. Manic Miner: I don't care what people say, Manic Miner was TIGHT, Jet Set Willy was too sprawling, too difficult and filled with too many bugs Goldeneye: Even when they remade the original, Daniel Craig's voiceover work should have been a clear indication of how he was going to approach future Bond films. Appearing bored shitless.
  13. gone fishin'

    The first one is still the best one

    Contra 4 on the DS is pretty good, not too hard and it's essentially a true direct sequel to Contra, retaining all of the original gameplay (including the 3D sections) and style. But wait, you say... my eyes!! My eyes!!! Why the hell did they make it over the two screens? Because people sometimes forget the original arcade had a vertical monitor
  14. gone fishin'

    The Alan Partridge Thread

    I don't know, it sounds a bit too close to Cunk on Britain
  15. gone fishin'

    Ridiculous unjustified retro listings

    With the C64 GS one, I often wonder with some of these listings, have they managed to pick one up at either a house clearance or car boot sale, checked on eBay for a "Buy it Now" price and just thought "this is worth a fortune", without actually checking the true value of it? So it ends up being a vicious cycle of bullshit eBay based valuations, which in turn filters down to the more realistic priced listings, causing those to go up too? I'll give an example, I was watching an eBay listing over the past week for a "spectrum games bundle", which didn't list the games being sold. Turned out it had the Ultimate Collected Works compilation (almost complete, missing the poster) and Martianoids in it. The bundle itself went for around £70 including postage, but if you looked at those two games individually, for the Ultimate compilation it's around the £70-£100 for Buy It Now listings. Likewise Martianoids is listed at around £50 Buy It Now. But do people pay that much for them? Are they really worth that? Or is it just sellers looking at other Buy It Now listings and thinking "this is worth a fortune", but nobody ever actually buys them? And is it just a UK problem? Because I often see European listings for CD32 games come up at fairly decent prices (under £30) that are Buy It Now for over £100 for UK sellers.
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