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rllmuk

misterSquare

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  1. I mean, technically yes, but these days it's nothing more than a super vague premise that lasts all of 20 seconds or so at the start/end of each video. They dropped the ongoing story stuff long ago, it's now just an (intentionally) very tenuous link into talking about a movie. If you've not already, I'd recommend trying some of the more modern ones - if you like Mike/Jay in general and enjoy BOTW then you'd probably enjoy it.
  2. The trailer for New really piqued my interest, so I've working through Young over the past few weeks and finally finished last night - absolutely loved it (Gutierrez! ) Will be starting New shortly - as much as I loved Jude Law, I'm very excited to see Malkovich take the lead, I think it'll be a fascinating contrast. I've no idea how big of a role Law is actually going to have in this season, so I'm trying to remain unspoiled!
  3. Ah, I didn't know that - that was the one that spawned Enemy Territory, right? If so then yes, excellent flamethrowers! Like others, I wouldn't ever claim it was a particularly great game but have fond memories playing the multiplayer (on good old Wireplay!) back in the day. IIRC there was a fun capture the flag style mode where you had to grab cash from the other team's safe and deposit it back at your base. I also seem to remember a particularly brutal long range burst gun that fired very slowly but was basically an insta kill if you hit someone with a full round - kinda the Kingpin equivalent of the Q2 railgun I got quite nostalgic watching some of the footage posted earlier, although the character movement speed looks totally bizarre in hindsight (but was probably quite acceptable at the time!)
  4. Yeah, the marketing usually refers to it as a 'fantasy console', which is a neat way to think of it. As in, it's a specification for a theoretical NES-style console with similar limitations on memory, CPU speed, screen resolution, audio, etc. There is no actual Pico 8 hardware, but rather an emulator that simulates a Pico 8 system, and you can create games and programs that run on that. The intentionally restrictive specs are what gives it its appeal - people like to try to see how much they can squeeze out of the limited feature set, and its also great for prototyping games as you don't run the risk of getting distracted by all the fancy bells and whistles that developing for eg. PC would give you. But yeah, the game files are tiny. You can even share them as .PNG files I believe
  5. Hm, that does sound a bit broken. But yeah, I think the unlock sequence for all the craft-able items is identical - as in, an NPC will present the item to you, you have to press triangle to take it, and that puts a couple of copies in you inventory as well as unlocking the recipe. If you've skipped that initial sequence somehow then I can see how you'd end up with neither I don't think there's any way around helmet guards without Devorantis unless you have one of the level 3 sling upgrades, or if there are rats around and you have some items that you can use to take out all the nearby fires (+ any guard lanterns) Incidentally, I finished this just last night - solid game! Considering the smaller budget, its really very impressive, and there was a nice escalation to your abilities as the game goes on. It looks great too, provided you can look past the stiff animation.
  6. I'm pretty certain you can complete it without touching Joustus, its entirely optional. Stick with it, the whole campaign is great.
  7. misterSquare

    WATTAM

    I had a great time with this Its pretty short, sometimes buggy, has some fairly major performance issues on PS4 (hitches and slowdown aplenty), and the controls are pretty dodgy, but its charming enough that you can overlook a lot of that. The story, for what it is, is actually pretty touching, and I think going for a more defined structure was a good approach rather than just another toy-like game (eg. Noby Noby Boy) The best bit was just trying to narrate new developments to my partner every time she wandered into the room and us both creasing up at the ridiculousness of it all. The head-canon you make up as you play it gets properly bizarre - I ended up with have an irrational hatred of Sun, thought Telephone was an entitled dick, and that everyone needs to chill the fuck out when it comes to Book. The less said about Doll, the better. WELCOME BACK DUFLOATCKY
  8. Just completed it - despite this slightly ranty post from a few weeks ago, I ended up really enjoying this! Did the final boss first time (PT Standard), but I'd read comments on here about the difficulty so was fully stacked up with as many health items and AEDs as possible. I think the combat system only really clicked for me on about chapter 10 or so but those last couple of chapters were glorious! Throughout the game, I really enjoyed the bits where things start kicking off back in the real world, and the final few chapters are basically that, back to back, which was great For some reason I also really liked the hub area when you're operating out of HAL's hideout, I enjoyed running around that bit of the city and mopping up all the sidequests whereas it felt like a bit of a chore on some of the earlier missions. But yeah, it's a funny old game, I stand by a lot of the criticisms from that earlier post. The combat in the first few chapters is really spread out, so you get introduced to all these new mechanics, UI, terminology, etc, and never really get an extended period of time to put them into practice, and the middle chapters are then quite heavily focused towards the astral plane and start to feel quite repetitive. Its only really in the last couple of missions that it settles down, stops throwing new mechanics at you, and actually lets you properly enjoy experimenting with the systems without feeling overwhelmed.
  9. Totally - it's even more impressive when you think back to his physique in You Were Never Really Here, which was only a couple of years ago. Reminded me of Christian Bale's crazy size changes back around the time of The Machinist/Batman Begins.
  10. IIRC its a skin condition (birthmark?) that he's always had. He usually wears makeup when on camera to cover it.
  11. Thanks - I've not, will give it a shot!
  12. Agreed, I gave the Japanese voices a try but ended up switching back to English as the subtitles were just too distracting during fights! Currently on chapter 6 and, I've got to say, I'm not loving it... On paper it should be right up my street (Platinum? Character action game? Yes please), but the combat just isn't clicking. I find it really hectic, but not in a good way, mainly due to a combination of poor camera framing, difficulty in reading/seeing enemy attacks amid all the chaos, and poorly (to me, at least) telegraphed attacks coming from off-screen. The Legions and the controls in general just feel really fiddly too, and I don't feel much connection between my inputs and the Legion's actions (I had a similar experience playing as V in DMC 5 so I think this style of deferred combat perhaps just isn't my bag). Occasionally it comes together and feels great... but not consistently. Having hazards dotted around the stage (holes in the ground, or damage/stun areas that you have to clear up with a particular legion) really breaks my flow too - I want to be wailing on enemies, not doing admin to make sure its safe to do so. Perhaps that's the issue? I'm wanting to play it Bayonetta style and get right in there amid the action, when I should be hanging back more? The astral plane platforming/traversal is also infuriating! The fact that your your jumps can be blocked by small bits of debris on the ground, coupled with your Legion being able to drag your character when the chain is fully extended, has resulted in countless falls when trying to jump to other platforms (especially when using the jump-round-a-corner poles). I love the real-world setting, but I'm increasingly feeling demotivated whenever I get dragged through a gate and have to spend twenty minutes traipsing around another identical looking red area and falling off things. But yeah, I don't think its a bad game by any stretch, its just a shame when something like this doesn't resonate with you as much as you hoped it would.
  13. My point was more that it'd be reductionist to paint R* as a leech on the economy and nothing more. If the company just upped sticks and moved all its operations to, say, Canada (which has a similar video game tax incentive scheme to the UK, and which I'm sure Ubisoft, EA etc. take full advantage of) all of those jobs would suddenly vanish, along with the income tax they generate. This simply isn't true - North is primarily art/design/code and production which will be almost entirely permanent staff. The only temps are likely to be extra QA taken on in the run up to a game's release (and even then, the majority of QA is done at dedicated QA studio in Lincoln). Besides, government grants like this specifically help prevent the continual hire-layoff-hire-layoff cycle, since you can only claim against long term staff members.
  14. To counteract all the outrage somewhat: Rockstar North is a wholly owned subsidiary of a US corporation - so the parent company will be paying US corporation tax, but the UK gets VAT on every sale of a Rockstar game in the UK (plus tax from employee salaries, which will be substantial) so it's somewhat disingenuous to claim that they're just leeching off the UK economy. It's entirely possible for a company to pay nothing in taxes, all that means that it's essentially reinvesting directly into the economy and workforce (which the government wants to encourage) rather than hoarding money (which the government wants a cut of). As for Video Game Tax Relief, the whole purpose is to attract companies to spend money in the UK. The 'relief' part of the name seems to be upsetting people by suggesting that its a limited pot of money that should be spent helping out struggling smaller developers. It's not - it's basically a pay-out to encourage investment in the UK in the first place. It's also proportional to the costs of the project, so R* gets more tax relief because their games are so expensive to make. As a company, you can spend millions on dev, pay 0% corp tax because your investment matched your outgoings, claim it as R&D, then get a chunky % back through the Video Game Tax Relief scheme. That's not dodgy, it's what the scheme was designed to promote - the hope is that companies that take advantage of it will then reinvest the profits in the UK and do it all again, thereby stimulating further growth in the economy. According to the BFI, for every £1 spent, £4 ends up in the UK economy: https://www.bfi.org.uk/sites/bfi.or...screen-business-summary-report-2018-10-08.pdf (FTE = Full time Equivalent Enrolment - basically man hours worked, GVA = Gross Value Added) (Disclaimer - I'm not a tax expert, but I doubt many else here are. This post is largely paraphrasing a thread on a games industry message board I'm a member of, who in general seemed pretty nonplussed about the original article. Apologies if anyone here wrote any of the above, not meaning to pass off your words as my own!)
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