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Anne Summers

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  1. I really can't say anything but ... don't be so sure
  2. From what I understand (and assuming you're talking about the Next not the Vega) it's largely because this is basically a completely new computer, rather than off-the-shelf innards in a new moulded box, configured to run emulators, like most of the other retro minis. The working keyboard is a hugely expensive part of the process too - none of the other minis so far have one.
  3. Anne Summers

    Amiga Appreciation Thread

    Did Psygnosis or Commodore do some sort of deal to get Amigas playing the rolling SotB demo in Dixon's/Rumbelows/Laskys shop windows? It always seemed to be there and that must have helped shift a load of Amigas. That probably had a lot to do with why the game became so famous as an example of what the Amiga could do.
  4. Anne Summers

    Rare/collectable Spectrum Games

    I was so excited to play it too - particularly as the manual makes it seem like it's pretty in-depth, with descriptions and stats for all the companions. It was unbelievably frustrating that it would never load. I agree about the boxes, would like to pick up some of the Amiga or maybe even PC gold box games at some point.
  5. Anne Summers

    Rare/collectable Spectrum Games

    Just bought the first game of what I am planning will become my new Speccy collection. Heroes of The Lance. Main reason I chose it is because I always wanted it when I had a Spectrum back in the day, being a big fan of the Dragonlance books. In fact I bought it twice, but neither version would load and I ended up returning them. Having since been able to read the reviews (as well as played it on emulators several times) I realise it's not that great a game. But I love the box art, and the whole package is very nostalgic to me. Also instinct tells me its the sort of thing that might hold its value for collectors in the future - being a conversion of a US-developed game for a machine that was never particularly popular in the US, and one of the few SSI games which got a Speccy version. As well as having a fairly heavyweight license attached which might make it interesting to collectors of Dragonlance/D&D merchandise as well as Speccy games collectors. But really that's all just an interesting aside, by far the main reason I wanted it is because it's something I lusted after in my childhood but couldn't have.
  6. Anne Summers

    Amiga Appreciation Thread

    The A2000 was the first Amiga I ever used, the model that came with a built-in hard drive, no less. Very nostalgic piece of kit for me. Unfortunately the bulkiness means it's pretty impractical for me to own. Same problem which puts me off owning any Amiga hardware any more, in fact!
  7. Anne Summers

    What is Metroidvania?

    Metroidvania was originally a Castlevania game in the style of a Metroid game. Now it's come to mean any game where your ability to explore an open world is gradually expanded as your character gains new items, techniques, powers, levels, abilities etc.
  8. Anne Summers

    AMIGArama Podcast Episode 64: Robocop

    Was inspired by this thread to have another look at the Amiga version of Golden Axe for the first time in many decades. When I first played it, I'd only played the arcade games a few times, as I had an improverished childhood (even the butler was poor) and 20p's were a rare commodity. In the meantime I've played the arcade game to death thanks to MAME, as well as the Megadrive version, thanks to the 50 million Megadrive compilations its been released on over the years. First thing I noticed was it was better than I was expecting - I was thinking my memories were probably rose-tinted, but it does a really good job of getting the feel of the arcade game right. Unlike for example the Double Dragon and Final Fight conversions. There are definitely some omissions though - most noticeably the more limited colour palette on the enemies and also the animation - most noticeably on the chicken leg which doesn't unfurl it's tail properly when it attacks, like it does on the arcade and MD versions. There's also some difference in enemy placements - eg in the version I played you don't fight the big shield enemy as a boss on the 2nd level, like in the other versions. Not sure why, as they appear later. It's definitely a very good port, though, by the standards of Japanese games converted to home computers by western developers.
  9. Anne Summers

    Why do we separate "retro" from general gaming?

    This is a good example, I think, of why folders are a little outdated when it comes to keeping online discussions organised. As has been discussed elsewhere (and often) - tags make it possible to mark topics which fall under more than one heading, and users can just sort by the tags they're interested in. Although I am sure there are plenty of people here who would fight tooth-and-nail against any suggestion of getting rid of folders, simply because it's the way things have always been done.
  10. Anne Summers

    Why do we separate "retro" from general gaming?

    If you just want to be a bog-standard pedant, then yes. However if you want to be a massive pedant, then the folder title "retro" is actually referring to the aspect of gaming which is discussed in the folder, rather than the actual individual games, so "retro" could cover both old games and new retro-styled games, as well as the other stuff that makes up the retro scene, such as streams, podcasts and Youtubers.
  11. Anne Summers

    Why do we separate "retro" from general gaming?

    I think there's two points worth making here - the first is that the retro folder is a bit of a hangover from the old ways of internet forums - back when rllmuk was created, pretty much every gaming forum had a dedicated retro folder. (Rllmuk just copied the folder structure directly from Edge Forum, if I remember right). Second point is about what the folder has grown into over 20 years, rather than what it was started as - for me it's more like a community distinction, rather than a content one. Threads about old games pop up in the main Discussion folder all the time these days. The difference is who will reply to them. If you put a thread about an old game into Discussion, you will get a lot of replies. If you put it in Retro, you might get fewer replies, but they will sometimes be more knowledgeable, due to the different crowd that posts there. Another point is that retro is definitely undergoing a bit of a resurgence at the moment. I suspect some of that is down to the growing popularity of retro Youtubers and (to a lesser extent) live streamers. Through my work I've been doing with Antstream, I found out that according to Amazon, "retro" is one of their most popular gaming-related keywords these days, and it's getting more and more popular. Just a few years ago someone told me that there's no point making retro video/streaming content for marketing purposes, as there isn't an audience for it. I don't think that's the case any more.
  12. Anne Summers

    Stuff that astonishes you about gaming

    No it isn't, my house isn't in Elite.
  13. Anne Summers

    AMIGArama Podcast Episode 64: Robocop

    Havent watched yet, but Amiga Golden Axe was great. Pretty much arcade perfect aside from losing some of the parallax and a slightly altered palette. It was one of the first Amiga games I had, and I spent a lot of time on it.
  14. Anne Summers

    The £200 introduction to gaming

    Where is PlayStation classic £25? I would buy one as a Final Fantasy 7 box for that price.
  15. Anne Summers

    Bandersnatch

    That's interesting and all sounds very likely - so it's never actually been confirmed by any of the people involved?
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