Jump to content


Photo

Photography Discussion


  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#31 The-Pope-Smokes-Dope!

The-Pope-Smokes-Dope!
  • Supporters
  • 11888 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:32 PM

Let me see if I can find a PDF of it...


Right found a copy if anyone wants the link PM me...
  • 0

#32 Alexlotl

Alexlotl
  • Members
  • 3143 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:34 PM

Wouldn't a forum-affiliate-coded link to Amazon be better? It's a corking book regardless, and it's only a tenner or so.

Flicking through the book now; generally speaking, there aren't "challenges" per se, but page after page of compositional techniques that we could try and follow as a challenge.

Very simple example - frame-with-in-a-frame, p 30-31. The challenge would simply be to take a frame-within-a-frame photo that week; then we can all post them, and discuss them. Might be interesting to adopt the book's lines-on-a-picture technique for this.

That's a deliberately simple example; other weeks will either be tricker (golden ratio photograph) or more subjective (just about all of the chapter on Intent), so discussion will be really useful.

It won't be a talent show, or necessarily about finding the most interesting subject, but about discussing what we were trying to achieve, and whether it works in that example. The idea being that we exercise, discuss and absorb bits of technique, which will then be at our fingertips when we need it.
  • 3

#33 Commander Jameson

Commander Jameson
  • Members
  • 11530 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:46 PM

I'd be up for this. I'll most likely buy the book anyway (and a couple of Freeman's others on there too as they look pretty good).
  • 0

#34 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:53 PM

Yup, sounds good.

I've been trying to get a little bit more of a handle on photographic history so I'll try and dig out some classics to go with each task. Mostly because 30-31, put to mind:

Posted Image

(Bresson, Spain, 1944)
  • 2

#35 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:56 PM

I'd be up for this. I'll most likely buy the book anyway (and a couple of Freeman's others on there too as they look pretty good).


I loved Photographer's Eye, but I didn't get on with Mind at all. I just found it a bit...bland. I've not looked at Vision.
  • 0

#36 iwan_canobi

iwan_canobi
  • Members
  • 3363 posts

Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:59 PM

I'd be up for this as well, could be the ideal thing to get me back into the swing of things again!
  • 0

#37 g wings

g wings
  • Members
  • 966 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:39 AM

Vaguely relevant. I turned an interesting day out with Leica into an indulgent article. Touches on the discreet-ness question. Let's not talk about that cost eh?

http://blog.richardw...ica_experience/


Great article and glad you enjoyed the rangefinder experience.

Leica gear is superb but beware, its very addicitve.

I had a dream set-up for a while; Leica M8, Summicron 35/2.0, Noctilux 50/1.0, Summilux 75/1.4 and some Zeiss and Voigtlander (12,15 and 21mm) lenses. I ended up selling it all when the second hand market inflated to ridiculous prices and all those pund signs were flashing before my eyes!

Using Leica gear provides a very different (and to me more pleasurable) experience to an SLR. Far less flexibility what with the lack of zooms, no autofocus, etc but a very pure photographic experience where you very quickly forget you are using a machine.

I'm gutted to have sold mine and am seriously thinking about making the switch back again but I would have to make do with less Leica glass and more of the third party equivalents (Voigtlander mainly). The Leica lenses are substantially better but to be honest just to go back to rangefinder shooting would be a joy.

Now lets see what the wife says!
  • 0

#38 Baz

Baz
  • Members
  • 1002 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 07:24 AM

Would anyone be up for a little project?

I've had The Photographer's Eye for some time, and while I've dipped in and out of it, I've never really gone through and tried out each section in full.

I'm thinking about working through it, completing the various challenges listed, and taking a photo of my own for each of the compositional points discussed. I could do this on a blog, but it might be more interesting to do it here on the forum.

Does anyone else have this book (or fancies getting it), and would be interested in joining in? We could kick off in mid February, in a dedicated thread. Not too structured, just work out a few tasks from each section and compare results.


I like the sound of this too - count me in if it happens.
  • 0

#39 Alexlotl

Alexlotl
  • Members
  • 3143 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 08:26 AM

Sounds like a date! I'll spin off a separate thread tomorrow with the details - Feb 15th start sound good? Then we can run the challenges Weds - Sunday, discuss Mon/Tues, then get going again.

Rev - love that idea. Great photo, too.

Moderator types (i.e. Andy) - do we have a Rllmuk Affiliate link for Amazon.co.uk that I can link at the top of the thread so anyone who joins in and buys a copy of the book kicks money back to the forum?
  • 0

#40 andy_s

andy_s

    Rllmuk Committee Member

  • Committee Member
  • 16838 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 09:37 AM

Sounds like a date! I'll spin off a separate thread tomorrow with the details - Feb 15th start sound good? Then we can run the challenges Weds - Sunday, discuss Mon/Tues, then get going again.

Rev - love that idea. Great photo, too.

Moderator types (i.e. Andy) - do we have a Rllmuk Affiliate link for Amazon.co.uk that I can link at the top of the thread so anyone who joins in and buys a copy of the book kicks money back to the forum?


15th sounds good and let me check on affiliate links.
  • 1

#41 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 10:57 AM

Rev - love that idea. Great photo, too.


I've put myself under pressure to find equally good stuff now, but I can't say it'll be a chore so not the end of the world.

Count me in.
  • 0

#42 The-Pope-Smokes-Dope!

The-Pope-Smokes-Dope!
  • Supporters
  • 11888 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:12 PM

Sounds like a date! I'll spin off a separate thread tomorrow with the details - Feb 15th start sound good? Then we can run the challenges Weds - Sunday, discuss Mon/Tues, then get going again.

Rev - love that idea. Great photo, too.

Moderator types (i.e. Andy) - do we have a Rllmuk Affiliate link for Amazon.co.uk that I can link at the top of the thread so anyone who joins in and buys a copy of the book kicks money back to the forum?


Sounds good, but i'd say we do it every two weeks, as once a week is going to end up being quite a bit of hassle at some point, every two weeks gives you and us a bit of leeway/breathing room.
  • 2

#43 andy_s

andy_s

    Rllmuk Committee Member

  • Committee Member
  • 16838 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:19 PM

Moderator types (i.e. Andy) - do we have a Rllmuk Affiliate link for Amazon.co.uk that I can link at the top of the thread so anyone who joins in and buys a copy of the book kicks money back to the forum?


We don't have one unfortunately.
  • 0

#44 Baz

Baz
  • Members
  • 1002 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 01:13 PM

Every two weeks sounds best to me also.
  • 0

#45 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 01:26 PM

These are my affiliate links, for the time being it doesn't get used for anything else so it'll obviously be just for rllmuk. If it does generate anything I'll pass it on in a lump in a few months:



If someone comes up with a better way, feel free.


EDIT: Or if there are some rules preventing it, obv.
  • 2

#46 Alexlotl

Alexlotl
  • Members
  • 3143 posts

Posted 08 February 2012 - 09:30 AM

Project Thread kicked off. Jump in, chaps.

Different question. What's the standard processing you generally do to your images? I'm just beginning to play with levels and curves, and they seem so powerful I'm not sure I need to use most of the other controls in Aperture, other than to save highlights and push exposure occasionally.
  • 0

#47 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:14 PM

Seemed a bit daft to make a new topic, so I'll stick it in here.

I think my favourite part about our hobby is looking at photobooks. As great as it is to browse images online, to my mind nothing beats flicking through the pages of a beautifully bound tome, drink in hand, taking in the images slowly and carefully. The photobook is the manifestation of the artist's hard work, with the images presented how the photographers desire, in the sequence they intended, and of course it gives us mere mortals the chance to own a small piece of art. The smell of the printed images on the page is quite something, too.

I thought it would be a good idea to share our photobook purchases so that people can recommend the books they love, treasures they've unearthed, and perhaps the odd stinker they feel is best avoided. Here are a few I've laid my hands on recently:

Bruce Gilden: Go

Posted Image

Compared to the smash-and-grab style that he employs on the streets of his native NYC, some of the photos in this book seem to be much less in-your-face and confrontational; more reminiscent of his Coney Island work. A lot of his subjects appear quite complicit at times which is something rather alien to Gilden's other books. As someone who has a great love of Japan it was terrific to see Gilden's take on the country, and expose it's seedy underbelly - a side that is often hidden away from from our view. If you're not familiar with Gilden's photography and his way of working, there's a cracking little video here. His books 'Facing New York' and 'Haiti' are well worth a look, too.

Daido Moriyama: Color Photograph

Posted Image

I own a lot of Moriyama's work, and recently there's been a trend in either releasing his older works, printed dreadfully with little thought or care, or new stuff like this that seems a good way to make a quick buck. While it's interesting to see some of his work in colour, the book appears to lack any sort of direction or purpose, and none of the images are truly striking as Moriyama is at his best. If you're a fan of his then, if you were being really kind, you could call it a neat little curio, but for people who are new to his work you could do much worse than have a look at his recent retrospective (printing qualms aside). Here's a video of the man at work.

Elin Høyland: The Brothers

Posted Image

I picked this up after reading about it in a recent issue of BJP. It's a wonderful book that looks at the life of two brothers, Mathias and Harald, who live their lives in secluded, rural Norway. The books documents a way of life now almost extinct and, far from painting them as outcasts or oddities, there's almost a quiet defiance about the way Hoyland presents them. The combination of portraiture and still life makes the book a thoughtful meditation on the lives of these two, now sadly deceased, men. The Guardian have a selection of the images to view here.

I look forward to reading other people's recommendations.
  • 1

#48 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:14 PM

Photobooks (and books of photography*) are definitely something I think this thread is here for. If it turns out we're

I've not exactly got a massive collection, although it's growing. I've got more books of photography, but I'll just keep to photobooks. 3 of note:

Berthold Steinhilber - Ghost Towns of the American West

Posted Image

Pics: http://www.bertholds...ghosttowns.html

Now this is a guy that can do lighting. Give or take every exterior shot is shot at night with what must be a significant number of light-sources illuminating everything. Every picture looks frankly amazing, total technical perfection throughout. I like that it gives information about the places being photographed, but a few times the information means the images are smaller on the page than they could have been. So it loses points for that, but it does have a nice forward by Wim Wenders.

Highly recommend though, the pictures are just gorgeous.

Ed Kashi - Three
Posted Image

A wanky flash animation that shows a fair bit of the book: http://edkashi.com/three.php

This is pretty much a greatest hits of a guy I'm not massively familiar with, put together as triptychs. Some of them work and they're magical, some of them, well, don't. It's a lovely book, loads of fold-out pages to view whole triptychs at full page size which is great. And the pictures at their best are as good as almost any - there's just a fair few fillers. I'd still recommend it though (especially if you get it for £4 from a charity shop. Ahem.)

Carmen Soth - Brighton Picture Hunt

Posted Image

Some pics: http://www.photowork...on-picture-hunt

This is either a clever one, or a silly one. It's probably heavily influenced by Alec Soth (he admits to doing the editing for a start), but it's credited to his 7 year old daughter so I'll credit it to her too. It sounds like a really wanky idea, get the 7 year old to look with fresh eyes, emperor's new clothes, blah. But...it's really nice. It's just a sweet little book, with some lovely pictures in it that feel like a girl having a wander around Brighton. If the top book was the height of technical ability, this is very much point and shoot. But I like it.

I'll do Books of Photography at some point.

*By my definition, I'd say that ones put together like a music album, works by a single artist are Photobooks, books that feature different photographers (even in magnificent examples) are books of photography. When it's a book of a single artist put together by someone else, usually after the death of the artist, it's harder. Depends on the book.
  • 1

#49 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:40 PM

I have that Soth book too, Rev. I remember he came in for a bit of criticism for it at the time. While it's interesting to see the world through the eyes of a seven year-old, as you note, with Soth effectively editing the book it makes you question how much of a seven year-old's vision the book really is. Certainly his daughter took the pictures, but would she have chosen to include the ones that her father chose in the book, and in the order he put them in? The images that Alec selected were done so in light of his own tastes, thoughts and ideas, not Carmen's.

And you're spot on with the photobook/books of photography definitions.
  • 0

#50 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:55 PM

It's...complicated though isn't it. I mean, Lester B. Morrison has worked on projects with Soth as well and he doesn't (seem to) actually exist. Who knows if she even clicked the shutter button (lots of the pictures do look like things a little girl would notice in Brighton, which is rather convenient), let alone whether her pictures are appearing in the right order. It's my inclination that she did, but there's no way of knowing. Loads of the quotes about it are ace, it has to be said. A couple that stick in my mind:

"I liked taking pictures of dogs more than people, but Dad said I had to"

A student, talking about the work "I noticed that the pictures seemed to be taken from a uniformly low perspective"

I've chosen to just believe the whole thing though. I think it's better that way. That's probably because Alec Soth seems to come across as a genuinely good-natured kinda guy who doesn't get trapped into Being An Artist all the time. Anyone who doesn't read "his" blog is missing out:

http://littlebrownmu....wordpress.com/
  • 0

#51 andy_s

andy_s

    Rllmuk Committee Member

  • Committee Member
  • 16838 posts

Posted 01 March 2012 - 12:03 PM

My favourite is still this:
Posted Image
I am fascinated by America and in particular this era anyway and every picture tells a story. I recently bought this too but haven't had a chance to read yet. Will post thoughts when I do.
Posted Image
  • 0

#52 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:45 AM

It's been a while since anyone's posted here. A couple of books I've laid my hands on recently:

Yukichi Watabe: A Criminal Investigation

Posted Image

This really is a beautiful book, not only for the photographs within it but for the way it is presented. Held shut by a band, the paper and printing combine to give the impression of newsprint or official documentation; with each turn of the page you get the sense you're leafing through a police case file from the 1950s. And in some ways, you are. Yukichi followed the investigators who were tracking the murderer of Sato Tadashi, parts of whose body (his nose, two fingers and penis) had been discovered on 13 January 1958, hidden in a vat of oil in Irabaki Prefecture. The photographs have a wonderful film noir quality to them as the plucky gumshoe follows lead after lead, meeting numerous people and visiting a great many locations on his journey. At points throughout the book there are snippets of text which detail the case's progress (or lack thereof) which, with each strained, puzzled or thoughtful expression on the investigator's face, add a terrific narrative to the work.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Jacob Aue Sobol: Sabine

Posted Image

This book and accompanying text are a wonderful love letter, not only from the photographer to Sabine, but also to the community in which Aue Sobol lived and worked for three years in Tiniteqilaaq, Greenland. The book chronicles Aue Sobol's life in the town as he learns its traditions, ways of life, and grows closer to the people within it, in particular the girl whose name is the title of the book. The photographs are stunning; from intimate portraits of his love, to graphic images of the bloodied animals that the men of Tiniteqilaaq have hunted, to the desolate scene of a house battered by wind, snow and ice on a cold, bleak night whose solitary light shines through a top floor window. That Aue Sobol abandoned his camera at the start of his stay in Greenland is a shame, but surely the turbulent emotions and experiences that he went through encouraged him to turn his mechanical eye to the world around him once more, and there is a clear sense that those feelings fuel the visual poetry of this inspiring book.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image
  • 3

#53 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 06 August 2012 - 01:58 PM

I've been meaning to bump this for a while, I've grabbed some rather cool books of late from eBay. I'll post about them sometime soon.

More pressingly, anyone who loves photobooks needs (not "ought to" or "could" needs) to go to the Photographer's Gallery in London before 9 September:

http://www.thephotog...se-photobooks-2

Literally just a room of (generally) amazing Japanese photobooks. You walk in, get a pair of white archival gloves and that's it, help yourself. 250 to flick through.

Also, photographer's gallery related again, this is a nice little project:

http://www.theworldinlondon.org.uk/

Let it all load and then sit back. I *love* the UKR one, but there are loads of cracking portraits in there.
  • 0

#54 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 08 August 2012 - 06:36 PM

Aye, the Japanese photobooks exhibition is fantastic - the breadth of the works is amazing, there's something for everyone. I need to go back as an hour simply wasn't enough time to enjoy all the tomes on offer. My only criticism would be the fact that the books themselves, as objects, aren't that interesting given that Japanese photography has produced some of the finest examples of how to put together a photobook. Still, I expect the value of them undoubtedly proved to be a factor in their selection.
  • 0

#55 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:19 PM

Not long now until the Moriyama and Klein show opens at the Tate. When I saw Moriyama's retrospective in Tokyo several years ago it left me dumbstruck and changed the way I viewed photographs and photography. His images are equal parts haunting, dystopian, sinister and atmospheric, and that's still doing him a disservice. I've bagged tickets for his talk next Tuesday and printing show the following Saturday, where you get to put together your own Moriyama tome which is then signed by the man himself. Excited doesn't quite cut it.

And Klein's no slouch, either.

Posted Image

Posted Image
  • 0

#56 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 05:06 PM

Have you seen that Daido is signing at The Photographer's Gallery next week? Mind you, last time I went in there when it re-opened they'd got more or less a bookcase of his books, seemingly all signed. I'll be going to the exhibition, but I'm not a massive fan of either. I can see the appeal with Moriyama, but I just don't click with him.

I really will write something about books I've bought recently at some point.
  • 0

#57 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 05:48 PM

He certainly seems to be something of a Marmite photographer. It's such a shame that his best work is so prohibitively expensive, and when they do reprint his stuff it's of such dreadful quality that it's not worth bothering. They've been reprinting his books in a similar format to the one in that last link for a number of years. I got burned once and haven't touched them since. His stuff needs to be blown up on big fucking pages so you can drink in the chaos, and not see you fumbling down the centrefold looking for every inch of the picture. And you're right, he does sign things for fun. I'm going to hold off on the Photographer's Gallery signing and wait until the print show.

The translation of his 'Tales of Tono' book should be excellent though. I've shuffled through it in my wonky Japanese, but am looking forward to getting to grips with it in my mother tongue. He's a wonderful writer and his book 'Memories of a Dog', a collection of essays and photographs, is one of my favourites.
  • 0

#58 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 11:12 PM

Yeah, the recent printings are annoying as they're really quite neat looking from the outside but even if you don't mind them being "portable" they lose massive amounts of each picture down the spine. I was going to grab one just for the sake of it really, but I decided that I'd end up ripping it apart (accidentally).

I am poised to go MENTAL in the Photographer's Gallery though, as I've got a 20% off voucher (for becoming a member) which brings them pretty much in line with Amazon but with browsing.
  • 0

#59 Klaark

Klaark
  • Members
  • 974 posts

Posted 14 October 2012 - 08:49 PM

As I mentioned a few posts up, I had tickets for both Daido Moriyama's talk and print show this week and neither event disappointed.

My girlfriend and I rushed straight from work to the Tate on Tuesday for his talk and by sheer good fortune caught Moriyama-san outside having a cigarette break with his entourage. There were plenty of people about but nobody seemed to know who he was. Anyway, I sidled up to him and in my best pidgin Japanese introduced myself as a fan and asked if he wouldn't mind having his photograph taken with me to which he duly obliged and then offered me a 'you're welcome' in English. Once I'd calmed myself down, the following talk was terrific - he came across as a very down-to-earth sort of chap who talked in a very matter of fact way about his photographs and career. He drew several laughs from the audience when regaling us with tales of how certain photographs had been taken, and when refusing to accept the meanings that several members of the audience had ascribed to his photographs as they posed questions to him. We were then allowed to enter the exhibition before it opened the next day. There was a great mix of video, photographs, books and prints within and the styles of Moriyama and Klein seem to compliment each other very well. I'd urge everyone to go along and see it for themselves. While inside the exhibition we also saw William Klein and, after much encouragement from my girlfriend, I approached him for a chat. I was very reluctant to speak to him as he has a reputation of being something of a prickly character, and he certainly lived up to said reputation. He answered my questions in the most blunt manner possible which discouraged me from probing him too much. Anyway, he was kind enough to sign one of his books that I had on me so that was pleasant enough.

Earlier today we attended the print show, too. There was a wide range of Moriyama's photographs on the walls - both old and new, black and white and colour - which we were able to select and sequence in any way we saw fit. Having compiled our selections we passed them to a member of staff who grabbed each of the copied sheets and stapled them in a silk screened cover, which had been prepared in front of us. Having compiled our photobook, it was then handed to Moriyama-san himself who signed it before it was passed to us. It was terrific to be part of the process of making a photobook, even if it was diluted in the extreme. However, it's a credit to the organisers that they were able to run such a tight ship, provide us with such a unique experience and the photobook itself all for just £20.

Posted Image
They say meeting your heroes can be a disappointment, but this week has proved to be anything but.
  • 3

#60 Rev

Rev
  • Members
  • 24321 posts

Posted 14 October 2012 - 09:38 PM

That sounds excellent. I'll probably go to the exhibition next weekend, I think.
  • 0


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users