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Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction


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#31 Chosty

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 08:26 AM

Just remembered that the post apocalyptic film A Boy and His Dog is based on a short story by Harlan Ellison, which he later expanded into a novella. I've not read either of them, but the film is decent, with some nice ideas and lots of surreal touches.
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#32 FishyFish

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 10:42 AM

Swan Song by Robert R McCammon

It bears a great many similarities to The Stand (including it's length), but it's a good read. Boy's Life is McCammon's best though.
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#33 Mr Cochese

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 02:12 PM

The Drowned World by J. G. Ballard is really good. It's more prosy and less satirical than later Ballard, and is somewhat like an update of Heart Of Darkness as it is quite psychological in tone.
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#34 Cosmic_Guru

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 12:37 PM

The Drowned World by J. G. Ballard is really good. It's more prosy and less satirical than later Ballard, and is somewhat like an update of Heart Of Darkness as it is quite psychological in tone.


Forms part of a sort of tryptych with The Draught and The Crystal World.
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#35 Alquanis

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 05:11 PM

Just read The Passage by Justin Cronin and thought it was pretty damn good. Definitely worth a read.
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#36 Swallow

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 11:23 AM

Literature blogs have recently become very introspective on the obsession (may be overstating it a bit) with dystopian and post-apocalyptic futures in novels. As we don't have a dedicated literature essays thread I thought I'd post this one in here.

http://m.io9.com/585...ould-try-anyway

I haven't yet read the essay in question but I certainly will when I have time. Looks to be very interesting and thought-provoking as to the value of forward-looking fiction.
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#37 The Keyzer

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:47 PM

Just read The Passage by Justin Cronin and thought it was pretty damn good. Definitely worth a read.


This. A thousand times this
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#38 ZOK

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 10:21 PM

There's a short story by Philip K.Dick which is apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, called 'Second Variety'.

I won't say anything about it, because the fact that it's by Dick should tell you all you need to know. Although it's very much darker than a lot of his short fiction, I suppose.
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#39 Harsin

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 11:53 PM

Just read The Reapers are the Angels after seeing glowing reviews for it and multiple comparisons to The Passage. Started off promisingly then around the halfway mark went a bit WTF and had an ending that while thematically appropriate didn't really work.
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#40 Talvalin

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 08:33 AM

Swan Song by Robert R McCammon

It bears a great many similarities to The Stand (including it's length), but it's a good read. Boy's Life is McCammon's best though.


I beg to differ. It's clearly The Wolf's Hour and I can say that without having read any of his other books. Why? The Wolf's Hour features Hitler, Rasputin (off-camera, so to speak), a mad scientist, a Nazi named Boots because he kicks/stamps people to death and a werewolf James Bond fighting Nazis.
[/off-topic]
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#41 Pistol

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 11:45 AM

Oh ma, I really need to read the Wolf's Hour again. It was so awesome. Really wish he'd made it into a series...
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#42 MagicStick

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 04:50 PM

Earth Abides is a good one.

Mockingbird by Walter Tevis is a stoke of genius though. It is beyond good!
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#43 ZOK

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 07:30 PM

There's a short story by Philip K.Dick which is apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, called 'Second Variety'.

I won't say anything about it, because the fact that it's by Dick should tell you all you need to know. Although it's very much darker than a lot of his short fiction, I suppose.


Just found this available from Project Gutenberg as an ebook. Enjoy!

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32032

NB if you download the illustrated version there's an image halfway through that is a bit of a spoiler, so best to read unillustrated first probably.
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#44 Blunted

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 07:44 PM

It would also be worth checking out some early work by JG Ballard, such as the novels The Drowned World and The Drought, and the short story collection The Disaster Area.

Just finished The Drowned World. Excellent book, thanks for the recommendation.
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#45 Looper

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:53 PM

Read The Passage by Justin Cronin a few weeks ago - you want an apocalypse, that's an apocalypse. Bit overlong maybe but it had me gripped the whole way.
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#46 KPnuts

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 07:42 PM

This is probably one of my favourite topics for books and movies. I like sci-fi but more realistic stuff, no aliens attacking and stuff like that. Some of my favourite reads have been The Stand, The Road and I Am Legend. Anyone recommend some stuff I may like?



Another recommendation for Orwell's 1984. Bleak but awsome.
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#47 ZOK

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 10:50 PM

A nifty avatar joke by Alask in another thread reminded me of the seminal post apocalyptic sci-fi snippet by Harlan Ellison, I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream. Seriously, read this short if you haven't, because it's amazing.

And as a general SF note, if you haven't read Deathbird Stories, a shorts anthology by Ellison (that doesn't include the above), go and do so right now you goddamn fuzzface, you rodder, you punk.
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#48 Strategos

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 02:13 PM

Swan Song by Robert R McCammon

the Stand It ain't!

I like his books including Wolfs Hour but hes not the greatest writer, his work always strikes me as a little immature. I enjoyed them much more when i was younger. But the ideas are fun, the stories are pretty solid and they are an easy read.
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#49 smac

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:34 PM

And as a general SF note, if you haven't read Deathbird Stories, a shorts anthology by Ellison (that doesn't include the above), go and do so right now you goddamn fuzzface, you rodder, you punk.


Also track down either of the Dangerous Visions anthologies he edited back in the late 60s/early 70s. Seminal stuff.
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#50 K.P.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:46 PM

Thanks to whomever recommended On the Beach, I really enjoyed the story. I have to say I thought the writing was pretty bad though, and I usually never notice that kind of thing.
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#51 Swallow

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:04 AM

I like it. It's realistic and suitably sombre. The tone is set with the T. S. Eliot excerpt at the beginning and that the book doesn't deviate from this atmosphere - despite some wonderfully comedic characters - while still remaining riveting is I think testament to Shute's skill with prose. It certainly doesn't feel 50 years old, partly due to the universality in western culture of its imagined premise but mainly because of the down-to-earth writing which avoids superficial romanticising of the characters and instead allows their actions in the gravest of situations to speak of their deeper personalities.
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#52 Harsin

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:34 PM

Just finished Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle.

I had some issues with areas of spotty characterisation and a few sub-plots that went nowhere, but overall I enjoyed it, I particularly enjoy apocalyptic fiction that focuses on the rebuilding of society post-disaster rather than the human race is forever screwed tales and this scratched that itch.

Spoiler

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#53 ZOK

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 02:28 PM

Ooh, I like the sound of that, will give it a go myself at some point.
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#54 smac

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 08:38 AM

I particularly enjoy apocalyptic fiction that focuses on the rebuilding of society post-disaster rather than the human race is forever screwed tales and this scratched that itch.


Ah, that reminds me of an old Algis Budrys book, 'Some Will Not Die', which concentrates on just that, in an episodic story set in a post-apocalyptic US. Ages since I read it; I seem to recall it was a solid enough read, if not particularly special. Possibly worth a punt for readers of this thread.

http://thistlesforbr...e-by-algis.html
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