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The Best Illustrated Children's Books

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Not really a picture book as such....but I've been using this with my class as an introduction to Macbeth before we tackle the more in-depth versions with the Shakespearian language etc.

The story has been rewritten in easy to understand language and the book is illustrated by children. A lot of the illustrations looks very similar so I'm not sure how original the designs are, maybe the children had some help! But still, good fun to look through.

-Macbeth-for-Kids-(Shakespeare-Can-be-Fun!).jpg

There are more of Shakespeare's plays in this series.

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Wifey picked up a book called 'Good Little Wolf' at Sainsburys today. It's a corker visually and the story, especially one part of it, is brilliant.

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Picked up another couple of books this week. Bumper crop of excellence!

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Latimer is basically the South African Oliver Jeffers. Not always a bad thing!

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I like the look of Ribbit and Rabbit. :D

It's got some lovely rhymes in it. It's basically a story of friendships and fallings out.

ribbit1.jpg

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That looks fab. Bought. What's Ninja like? Very obvious where the influence comes from but intriguing nonetheless.

Has anyone else seen The Good Little Wolf? I'd be interested in hearing what you thought about the story (you'll know which bit).

Good-Little-Wolf-Shireen-Nadia-9780375869044.jpg

((in fact on the story side of things my wife bought the book solely so that she could watch my face while I read it)).

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No idea what that book could be mediadave....it does sounds almost vaguely familiar though. How annoying!

I want this book:

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Looks so simple but at the same time it rather appeals to me. Possibly because pigeons amuse me. ^_^

It's brilliant! It's very short but very funny. Especially the increasing desperation of the pigeon to get you to let him drive the bus. There's another really funny one, about a king who wants a new story to be written and keeps telling the reader to stop reading while they find the lost pages for it. Found it - it's called Don't Read This Book!

post-242-097312400 1313877283_thumb.jpg

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Look what arrived today...

stuck-book_SWBMDAwNzI2Mzg2NA==.jpg

From the opening page you know how the story is going to progress but that is also part of its charm as you are waiting for more absurd objects to get thrown up into the tree with his kite. It might lack the sweetness of his other stories but it is arguably one of his funniest and the illustrations are, as always, brilliant.

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http://www.buzzfeed.com/expresident/space-oddity-as-a-childrens-book

An illustrator called Andrew Kolb has adapted David Bowie's Space Oddity into a somewhat Mary Blair-esque children's book. There was a PDF available on his site yesterday, but it seems that since then the link has exploded in popularity and he's had to take it down "due to legal concerns". :(

Of course, it hasn't taken long for people to do the obvious and make videos setting it to the original song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCaredAbNjw

I've never visualised the instrumental break as a meteor shower before!

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stuck-book_SWBMDAwNzI2Mzg2NA==.jpg

Yet again my bookshop decided it didn't want to stock it in hardback. Luckily for me I was in Piccadilly last week and picked up a copy...signed by O-J himself.

What a silly goose he is! Throwing an orang-utan up a tree! Lovely stuff from Jeffers (as always), and there's definitely a maturity building in his drawings and ideas of late. It's good to see.

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post-16104-023035700 1319633878_thumb.jp

My mum read this to me as a boy and now I read it to my son (same tatty, well loved copy) and we both adore it.

The dad looks like Nicholas Cage. :)

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Love those, gafgalash. They have a vague Mary Blair quality to them.

Just seen this brief animated film based on the brilliant Chris Van Allsburg’s classic children’s book The Mysteries of Harris Burdick.

The book was recommended to me in this very thread and it didn't disappoint.

Synopsis: The Mysteries of Harris Burdick is a 1984 picture book by the American author Chris Van Allsburg consisting of a series of unrelated, highly detailed images in the author's distinctive style. Each image is accompanied by a title and a single line of text, which compel readers to create their own stories.[1]

A fictional editor's note tells of an encounter with an author and illustrator named Harris Burdick, who provided the images and captions as samples, each from a different picture book he had written. He left with a promise to deliver the complete manuscripts if the editor chose to buy the books. Burdick was never seen again, and the samples are all that remain of his supposed books. Readers are challenged to imagine their own stories based on the images in the book.

The image/title/caption pairings all suggest stories that are magical or fantastical and range from sinister to intriguing to whimsical. The book is sometimes used in schools as a springboard for creative writing exercises.

The book is available in a Portfolio Edition which includes another image/caption pair from the story "Missing in Venice". Which was found in a mirror that a man bought in the bookstore. The mirror shattered, and the picture fell out, with the title of, "Missing in Venice".

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Oliver Jeffers has a new book out soon (not sure exactly when but it is up for pre-order in all the usual places).

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Synopsis: An exquisite new book, featuring a boy and his moose, from internationally best-selling, multi-prize-winning picture book creator, Oliver Jeffers.

“Wilfred owned a moose. He hadn’t always owned a moose. The moose came to him a while ago and he knew, just KNEW that it was meant to be his. He called it Marcel.”

Most of the time Marcel is very obedient, abiding by Wilbur’s many rules on How to Be a Good Pet. But one dark day, while deep in the woods, someone else claims Wilfred’s moose as their own…

Is Marcel really Wilfred’s pet after all?

An exquisitely-illustrated, witty and thought-provoking story, [exploring the concept of ownership], from international picture book sensation, Oliver Jeffers.

Love the cover.

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Looks gorgeous. Will look forward to seeing it, either in app or paper format or, more likely knowing me, both.

Related subject. Read a couple of interesting blog about a long forgotten Saul Bass children's book. Can't find the story I enjoyed most but this ones got some of the details.

http://www.graficdesign.info/about/design/saul-bass-long-forgotten-childrens-book-gets-reprinted

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The newest Oliver Jeffers book is out: The Hueys in the New Jumper.

The iPad version is read by Jarvis Cocker.

Whilst it is still a beautifully illustrated and charming story I think it is the weakest of all his books to date. I know The Hueys are going to be used in a series of books so it will be interesting to see what stories he comes up with. The iPad version looks great though.

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Not really a picture book as such....but I've been using this with my class as an introduction to Macbeth before we tackle the more in-depth versions with the Shakespearian language etc.

The story has been rewritten in easy to understand language and the book is illustrated by children. A lot of the illustrations looks very similar so I'm not sure how original the designs are, maybe the children had some help! But still, good fun to look through.

-Macbeth-for-Kids-(Shakespeare-Can-be-Fun!).jpg

There are more of Shakespeare's plays in this series.

I was trying to work out why the witch in the middle was in the pot, then realised I was looking at it wrong. :facepalm:

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Terrifying French children's books

More: http://storify.com/jennycolgan/terrifying-french-children-s-books

La Vie de (the life of) Kuma Kuma. I love this one, it's one of those everyday books for very young children, where an animal gets up, brushes its teeth, eats its breakfast etc.

aghwe.jpg

Here's Kuma Kuma, for example, reading a book when the sun goes down.

p3tlx.jpg

Any english book along these lines would end with Kuma-Kuma surrounded by his ethnically varied friends and being cuddled good night by his mother telling him he was as special as a star or something. Not so here. The very final page says merely:

"I'd like to think that Kuma Kuma is happy...".

opposite a BLANK PAGE.

Suck on THAT, pre-schooler.

k24wc.jpg

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Shame there doesn't appear to be any English versions of those stories as a few of those look great.

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Last night I remembered the wonderful 'Le Petit Nicolas' books. They were written by René 'Asterix' Goscinny and illustrated by Jean-Jacques Sempé.

In fact, that's given me an idea for a new avatar.

I guess it was a keeper!

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I've just gone through this entire thread, great stuff everyone!

My little boy Oscar is nearly 2 now and has taken a huge interest in books recently. After we rinsed The Very Hungry Caterpillar (which we go back to now and again), and Peepo and Dear Zoo, we read 'A Bit Lost' which was part of a few my Mum had sent me at random. It's excellent, though I don't think he quite grasped the storyline, he kept thinking the squirrel was the Owl's mother. It's called Little Owl Lost in the US (literally: lol!). Very much recommended, especially for kids just starting out on reading time.

The Gruffalo has been a fantastic book, by far the one I've read the most times after A Bit Lost. I'm surprised there isn't more praise for it in here really. I am hoping to get the sequel for his birthday next week. I enjoyed the animation too, but it was at the limits of what he can watch really, quite scary. Plus as Ramone pointed out once, the version of the mouse in the animation is a bit of a nervous thing who lucks his way out of danger whereas in the book he seems pretty cocksure through the whole thing.

Then of course Where the Wild Things Are which captured his imagination from the very first moment we picked it up.

Dr Seuss' One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is another one he loves, though I skip over some pages to get to the end a bit quicker as it's quite long otherwise, and I don't rate every part.

Oliver Jeffers' Up and Down looks amazing but I didn't like it at first. I gave it another go after another friend recommended it and again I didn't like it. Perhaps it's better for older kids or ones that can read it themselves?

A random one we picked up second hand somewhere is Tillie and the Wall which I think looks great and I very much like the story. I have a couple of pics of it just here:

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We've also just started reading In the Night Kitchen which I thought looked very odd and wouldn't have bothered with if not for the glowing recommendation from a friend. It's the second book in Maurice Sendak's Wild Things trilogy apparently. Wild Things was done in the 60s, this one a full decade later (and the last one in the 80s!). So I presented the book to Oscar and he straight away said "Max!" even though I think the art style looks totally different, I was surprised! Anyway, we open the book and he's pretty much under a spell from the first second right to the end, even trying to join in with the reading, on the first reading! This is an absolute must for any parent - utterly bonkers, has to be read like some sort of beat poet, but quite magical.

The Tiger Who Came to Tea is one we read this evening and very pleased he was with it too. Nice illustrations and he seemed to understand the whole concept, calling the tiger naughty (although insisting the tea was coffee). Really pleased about this one.

Giraffes Can't Dance - a book I don't particularly like the illustration style of, turned out to be a touching and uplifting tale, with plenty of things to look out for in the richly detailed pictures.

I've got a huge book of all the Beatrix Potter tales, but so far we've only read Peter Rabbit a few times and Squirrel Nutkins once (fyi: it's too long and his rapping is shit).

I'm looking to pick up the following books for his birthday, hoping some will drop through the door soon :)

The Snail and the Whale (By the Gruffalo pair)

Oh no, GEORGE - Chris Haughton (author of A Bit Lost) - we nearly bought the Finnish version but it was over £20

Are you my mother?

I want my hat back

Good little wolf

I really want to eat a child

Tiny Little Fly

Mr Big - Ed Vere

Penguin - Polly Dunbar

The Frog and Toad books

Any others that come highly recommended that I might have missed? A lot of the books here have been excellent looking, but I'm thinking ones for the very young (2+) crowd.

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